BLM Nevada COVID-19 Information

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Gold Butte HMA

All colors and types of burros are represented. 

Location: The Gold Butte Herd Management Area (HMA) is located in south-central Nevada in Clark, county. The Bureau of Land Management, Las Vegas District, and U.S. Park Service have joint administrative responsibilities for wild burro management within these public lands. 

Size: The area consists of 170,354 acres of BLM land and 8,210 acres of a mix of private and other public lands for a total of 178,564 acres.

Topography/Vegetation: The primary use area within the HMA, is characterized as a "high" desert surrounded by low, rocky desert mountains. This HMA has Lake Mead for over half of its boundary.  Permanent water sources consist of springs found in the area and Lake Mead. The animals, at times, have to travel up to ten miles to and from water each day during the drier part of the year. Burro's drink at least once each day during the hotter part of the year, but can survive by drinking every second day during the winter and early spring. Climate in the area is quite harsh, with winter temperatures falling below 32 degrees Fahrenheit and summer temperature over 100 degrees. Rainfall averages only 4 to 5 inches per year, divided almost equally between summer and winter. Summer rains are localized, short and very intense while winter and spring rains are less intense and occur over a wider area. Vegetation in the HMA is typical Mojave desert shrub; low growing and able to survive long periods of drought. The vegetation consists of salt-tolerant plants such as saltbush, greasewood and rabbitbrush, with grasses such as galleta grass and Indian ricegrass. The mountains contain pinyon pine and juniper trees, with an understory of sagebrush and other mountain shrubs and small amounts of grass. 

Wildlife: The burros share the area with desert mule deer, coyotes, fox and mountain lions, as well as many species of small wildlife. Birds include the rare prairie falcon, ravens, quail, starlings, horned larks and many more. Reptiles include many species of lizards and both poisonous (rattlesnakes) and non-poisonous snakes. 

AML:  22-98 Burros