Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument

The cone-shaped tent rock formations against a blue sky at Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument.

Nov. 29, 2022 update:

Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument remains closed to the public. Access along NM22 is currently limited to tribal members only to reduce COVID-19 exposure to the gateway community of Pueblo de Cochiti. BLM is continuing to work in close cooperation with the Pueblo de Cochiti to develop a reopening plan to address long standing issues including over-visitation, long wait times, staffing needs, and resource protection.

It is BLM’s hope that through these efforts, the Monument will re-open in a way that reduces impacts on the land and resources, as well as to the Cochiti people, and will provide an improved experience for all visitors. As reopening plans become more solidified, BLM will be releasing new information to the public via https://www.blm.gov/visit/kktr and our social media pages. We look forward to seeing our visitors when we reopen!

In the meantime, please visit some other great areas within our field office.  For more information about these areas, please contact our office at 505-761- 8700, or visit https://www.blm.gov/programs/recreation/recreation-activities/new-mexico and click on the Rio Puerco Field Office (Albuquerque) link.  


The Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument is a remarkable outdoor laboratory, offering an opportunity to observe, study, and experience the geologic processes that shape natural landscapes. The National Monument, on the Pajarito Plateau in north-central New Mexico, includes a national recreation trail and ranges from 5,570 feet to 6,760 feet above sea level. It is for foot travel only, and contains two segments that provide opportunities for hiking, birdwatching, geologic observation, and plant identification.

The cone-shaped tent rock formations are the products of volcanic eruptions that occurred 6 to 7 million years ago and left pumice, ash, and tuff deposits over 1,000 feet thick. Tremendous explosions from the Jemez volcanic field spewed pyroclasts (rock fragments), while searing hot gases blasted down slopes in an incandescent avalanche called a “pyroclastic flow.”

Precariously perched on many of the tapering hoodoos are boulder caps that protect the softer pumice and tuff below. Some tents have lost their hard, resistant caprocks, and are disintegrating. While fairly uniform in shape, the tent rock formations vary in height from a few feet up to 90 feet.

Season/Hours

Hours of Operation:

  • Nov. 29, 2022 update:

    Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument remains closed to the public. Access along NM22 is currently limited to tribal members only to reduce COVID-19 exposure to the gateway community of Pueblo de Cochiti. BLM is continuing to work in close cooperation with the Pueblo de Cochiti to develop a reopening plan to address long standing issues including over-visitation, long wait times, staffing needs, and resource protection.

    It is BLM’s hope that through these efforts, the Monument will re-open in a way that reduces impacts on the land and resources, as well as to the Cochiti people, and will provide an improved experience for all visitors. As reopening plans become more solidified, BLM will be releasing new information to the public via https://www.blm.gov/visit/kktr and our social media pages. We look forward to seeing our visitors when we reopen!

    In the meantime, please visit some other great areas within our field office.  For more information about these areas, please contact our office at 505-761- 8700, or visit https://www.blm.gov/programs/recreation/recreation-activities/new-mexico and click on the Rio Puerco Field Office (Albuquerque) link. 

Driving Directions
  • From Albuquerque, head north on I-25 and take the exit for Santo Domingo/Cochiti Lake Recreation Area (Exit 259) off I-25 onto NM 22. Follow the signs on NM 22 to Cochiti Pueblo and Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument. 
  • From Santa Fe, head south on I-25 and take the Cochiti Pueblo Exit 264 off I-25 onto NM 16. Turn right off NM 16 onto NM 22, and follow the signs to Cochiti Pueblo and the National Monument. 
  • Note, following the GPS coordinates may take you through tribal lands that are not accessible. Please follow the directions above and access the Monument from I-25.
Accessibility
  • There are ADA compliant rest rooms, picnic facilities, kiosks and parking.
  • The Cave Loop Trail is 1.2 miles long and is rated as easy. While the trail is gravel/sand there are a few sections that are accessible to wheelchairs.
  • At the Veterans' Memorial Overlook you will find ADA-accessible picnic areas, rest rooms, trails and facilities.
Trail Information
  • Trail Guide
  • The national monument includes a national recreational trail. It is for foot travel only, and contains two segments that provide opportunities for hiking, birdwatching, geologic observation and plant identification. Both segments of the trail begin at the designated monument parking area.
  • The Cave Loop Trail is 1.2 miles long, rated as easy. The more difficult Canyon Trail is a 1.5-mile, one-way trek into a narrow canyon with a steep (630-ft) climb to the mesa top for excellent views of the Sangre de Cristo, Jemez, Sandia mountains and the Rio Grande Valley. Both trails are maintained; however, during inclement weather the canyon may flash flood and lightning may strike the ridges.
  • The Veterans Memorial Trail is a 1-mile long loop trail, rated as very easy and is wheel chair accessible. The Veterans Memorial is located at the end of a 3 mile long gravel surfaced road overlooking picturesque Peralta Canyon and Jemez Mountain peaks. Picnic tables, shelters and toilets are available at both sites.
Prohibitions and Restrictions
  • The Monument is closed to dogs, excluding service animals.
  • Day Use Only
  • No open fires, shooting, alcoholic beverages, glass containers or climbing on the "tent rocks."
  • Do not trespass on tribal, private, or state land.
  • Access to Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks may be closed by order of the Cochiti Tribal Governor. Closures will be posted at the gate.
  • No motorized vehicles or mountain bikes are allowed.
  • Protect live trees and shrubs. You may not cut green trees or firewood without a permit.
  • No collecting of plants, rocks, obsidian "apache tears," or wildlife.
  • Please stay on designated roads and trails.
  • Geocaching is prohibited.
  • Please, do not feed the wildlife
  • Hunting and recreational shooting is not allowed in the Monument.
Brochures, Maps and Publications

 

Quick Facts

Presidential Proclamation

Created: January 17, 2001

Size: 4,645 acres of public land

Coordinates: 35°36'52.0"N   106°21'33.2"W

No DogsThe Monument is closed to dogs, excluding service animals.

 

Contact Us

Monument: 505-331-6259

Field Manager: 505-761-8797

Rio Puerco Field Office 
100 Sun Avenue NE
Pan American Bldg.
Suite 330
Albuquerque, NM  87109-4676
505-761-8700

Public Lands Information Center

Plan Your Visit

Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks Trail Guide

Manager's Reports

Manger's Report 2021