Tribal Consultation

Cedar Mesa Grand Gulch

TRIBAL CONSULTATION

The United States has made solemn promises to Tribal Nations for more than two centuries. Honoring those commitments is particularly vital now, as our Nation faces crises related to health, the economy, racial justice, and climate change — all of which disproportionately harm Native American communities. 

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The United States has made solemn promises to Tribal Nations for more than two centuries. Honoring those commitments is particularly vital now, as our Nation faces crises related to health, the economy, racial justice, and climate change — all of which disproportionately harm Native American communities. 

At the Bureau of Land Management, which is a part of the Interior Department, honoring our nation-to-nation relationship with Tribal Nations, strengthening Tribal sovereignty and self-governance, and upholding the trust and treaty responsibilities are paramount to fulfilling our mission. This means going beyond just checking the box to say we talked to Tribal Nations when we take actions that may affect Native American communities. 

As an agency, we respect the ties that native and traditional communities have to the land. America’s Indigenous peoples have roots that stretch back to before the founding of the United States—and are an important source of information for strong, inclusive land management policy. We have learned that we best serve when we speak with and listen to tribal voices when formulating Federal policy that affects Tribal Nations.

That’s why we are reaffirming our commitment to robust consultations as the cornerstone of federal Indian policy. For example, BLM will be undertaking formal Tribal consultation as part of a proposed 20-year withdrawal of federal lands within a 10-mile radius around Chaco Culture National Historical Park in New Mexico, which would bar new federal oil and gas leasing on those lands. Chaco Canyon and the greater connected landscape has a rich Tribal and cultural legacy. As part of the process, our goal is to manage existing energy development, honor sensitive areas important to Tribes, and build collaborative management frameworks toward a sustainable economic future for the region. The BLM also conducted Tribal consultations regarding a review of the monument boundaries and conditions of the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monuments in Utah. This review was important because national monument designations protect sacred Tribal lands, which are part of traditional land uses for many Native American communities. 

Just as the BLM and DOI are prioritizing tribal engagement, so too is President Biden, whose January 26, 2021, Presidential Memorandum reaffirms a policy that requires Federal agencies to prepare and periodically update a detailed plan of action to implement the policies and directives of Executive Order 13175 (Consultation and Coordination With Indian Tribal Governments). 

These efforts underscore our belief that the Federal Government has much to learn from Tribal Nations and strong communication is fundamental to a constructive relationship. Our approach to engaging with Tribal governments helps the BLM identify the cultural values, the religious beliefs, the traditional practices, and the legal rights of Native American people, which could be affected by BLM actions on public lands. 
 

Ongoing National BLM Government-to-Government Consultations

The BLM National Headquarters coordinates with individual BLM State Offices to facilitate consultations that address broad topics, such as proposed rulemakings and national program reviews. Local Field Office and District Office consultations are not listed here. More information related to national ongoing consultations is located below.


BLM GOVERNMENT-TO-GOVERNMENT CONSULTATION FOR FIVE RULEMAKINGS INCLUDED IN PRESIDENT BIDEN’S SPRING 2021 UNIFIED AGENDA OF REGULATORY AND DEREGULATORY ACTIONS


BLM GOVERNMENT-TO-GOVERNMENT CONSULTATION FOR REVIEW OF THE FEDERAL COAL LEASING PROGRAM


Contact Information

National Headquarters Tribal Liaison Officer
Nicole Hanna

Email: nhanna@blm.gov

Download the full list of BLM Tribal Coordinators