Wabayuma Peak Wilderness

Address:

Kingman Field Office 2755 Mission Boulevard Kingman, AZ 86401

Latitude/Longitude:
34.960242, -113.993024
Directions:

A high-clearance 4-wheel drive vehicle is strongly recommended for all access routes described.

Boriana Canyon Access: Proceed west on I-40 from Kingman for approximately 23 miles. Take Exit 25, which is the Yucca and Alamo Road exit. Follow the signs for Alamo Road, proceeding south and east from the interchange for 3.2 miles. Turn left onto Boriana Mine Road and drive an additional 9.9 miles. The wilderness boundary will be on the left (northwest).

Southwest Boundary Access: Proceed west on I-40 from Kingman for approximately 23 miles. Take Exit 25, which is the Yucca and Alamo Road exit. Follow the signs for Alamo Road, proceeding south and east from the interchange for 3.2 miles. Turn left onto Boriana Mine Road and drive an additional 4.5 miles. Turn left onto Suzette Road. Continue north on Suzette Rd for 1.37 mi, turn right and head east for 0.6 mi, turn left and head northeast. The wilderness boundary will be east of the road for approximately 1 mi. Alternatively, continue north on Suzette Rd for 1 mile, continue straight or turn right at the crossroads, the wilderness boundary will be north of this road for approximately 1 mile both ways.

CAMPING
HIKING
HORSEBACK RIDING
WILDERNESS
WILDLIFE VIEWING

Wabayuma Peak Wilderness

The 40,000-acre Wabayuma Peak Wilderness is located in Mohave County, 20 miles southeast of Kingman, Arizona.

This wilderness is dominated by the 7,601-foot Wabayuma Peak. A series of massive ridges that extend from the peak in a semicircle to the north, south, and west, plunge nearly 5,000 feet to the desert floor below. This extensive elevation change accommodates a broad spectrum of ecosystems. The lower reaches of the wilderness contain a mixture of Sonoran and Mohave Desert vegetation. Upper elevations are covered with Arizona chaparral vegetation, and ponderosa pine forests can be found on the mountain summits.

The sheer size and scale of the rugged terrain guarantee a variety of challenging and interesting hikes, backpacking trips, horseback rides and nature study, and encourage extended overnight camping. Visitors can travel through desert shrub and ponderosa pine in one day and are afforded the opportunity for exceptional botanical and wildlife sightseeing within a relatively small geographic area.
 

Know Before You Go

  • No legal access is possible to the north and northwest sides of the wilderness because access roads cross private property at several points.
  • A high-clearance four-wheel drive vehicle is strongly recommended for all access routes.
  • Water is generally available at springs indicated on topographic maps. Always purify any water found prior to use.
  • Summertime temperatures, even at the higher elevations, can be dangerous if you are not prepared. More moderate conditions are present between October and May, although snow can be present during winter months, which can make access to higher elevations difficult or impossible.
  • Please follow the regulations in place for this area, and use Leave No Trace techniques when visiting to ensure protection of its unique natural and experiential qualities.
  • Motorized equipment and equipment used for mechanical transport are generally prohibited on all federal lands designated as wilderness. This includes the use of motor vehicles (including OHVs), motorboats, bicycles, hang gliders, wagons, carts, portage wheels, and the landing of aircraft including helicopters. Contact the agency for more information about regulations.
  • Some lands around and within the wilderness are not federally administered. Please respect the property rights of the owners and do not cross or use these lands without their permission.