Seminoe to Alcova Backcountry Byway

Seminoe to Alcova Byway
Phone:
Address:

Rawlins Field Office 1300 3rd St. Rawlins, WY 82301

Latitude/Longitude:
41.781455, -107.123184
Directions:
To begin at the northern end (Alcova, Wyo.): Begin at junction of Wyoming Highway 220 and Kortes Road (Natrona County 407) and drive south. Continue on County Road 407 until the Carbon County Line where the road becomes County Road 351.

To being at the southern end (Sinclair, Wyo.): Begin at the town of Sinclair, Wyo., at the junction of Interstate 80 and Carbon County Road 351, exit 219. The byway follows County Road 351 north into Natrona County and ends at Alcova, Wyo. Please note that there are very few services and no gas available along this route.
AUTO TOURING
BIKING
CLIMBING
CAMPING
FISHING
HIKING
HORSEBACK RIDING
HUNTING
WATER SPORTS
WILDLIFE VIEWING
PHOTOGRAPHY

Seminoe to Alcova Backcountry Byway

The 64-mile Seminoe-Alcova Back Country Byway lies in south central Wyoming. As you travel, you'll pass pronghorn-grazed prairie, stark desert, and you'll climb the rugged Seminoe Mountains. Although the road is in a remote area, the amazing transformations in the landscape are worth the back-country journey.

Attractions along the byway include Alcova and Pathfinder reservoirs, Seminoe Reservoir, the Seminoe and Pedro mountains, and Seminoe State Park. With the building of Seminoe Dam and the upgrade of the road, fishermen and boaters began visiting the area.

On your trip, you might see a variety of wildlife in the area, including mule deer, antelope, bighorn sheep, golden and bald eagles, pelicans, and ferruginous hawks. You'll cross rugged mountains and the Miracle Mile, a blue-ribbon trout fishery of the North Platte River. There's a huge sand dune along the way, part of the Killpecker Sand Dunes, a dune field which reaches from western Wyoming into Nebraska.

Photos

Seminoe to Alcova Byway

BLM WYOMING KNOW BEFORE YOU GO

The BLM welcomes you to explore, enjoy, and make positive memories from your outdoor experiences on America's public lands and waters. Please remember these are wide-open spaces and wildlands. Plan ahead and be aware of potential hazards. It is everyone's responsibility to take the necessary steps to minimize chances of becoming lost or injured on public lands.
 

When visiting public lands, please also practice Leave No Trace and Tread Lightly principles.
 

For other key advice on various recreation activities, please see the BLM's trip-planning tips. These helpful tips can help you make the most of your recreation experience. However, for more information about local conditions, regulations and recreation resources, there is no substitute for visiting the closest BLM office.