Dry Creek Petrified Tree Environmental Education Area

Petrified Tree Remnants
Phone:
Address:

Buffalo Field Office 1425 Fort Street Buffalo, WY 82834

Latitude/Longitude:
44.35237369, -106.5328609
Directions:
To access the area from Interstate 90, take the Red Hills/Tipperary Road (Exit 65). Cross under the interstate and head northeast on Tipperary Road for 6 miles. Turn left onto the Petrified Tree access road, directly across the road from a ranch house. This two-track will cross a cattle guard and continue about 0.6 mile to the parking area. The road to this area is a graveled all-weather road, but snow drifts are common in the winter months.
AUTO TOURING
INTERPRETIVE PROGRAMS
HIKING
PICNICKING
WILDLIFE VIEWING
ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION
PHOTOGRAPHY

Dry Creek Petrified Tree Environmental Education Area

The Dry Creek Petrified Tree Environmental Education Area is located about 13 miles east of Buffalo, Wyoming. The site offers visitors an opportunity to discover the history of the northeastern Wyoming landscape. About 60 million years ago these red sage hills and sagebrush country were a jungle-like swamp with towering Metasequoia trees. Many of these trees still exist as petrified wood.

A 0.8 mile interpretive loop trail winds its way through portions of remnant petrified trees. A shelter with picnic tables and vault toilets are available. Backcountry camping is allowed in the recreation area, outside of the fenced in trail and picnic area.

Adventure is at Your Fingertips

Photos

Petrified Tree Remnants
Petrified Tree Remnants

DRY CREEK PETRIFIED TREE ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION AREA PHOTOS

Dry Creek Petrified Tree Environmental Education Area

BLM WYOMING KNOW BEFORE YOU GO

The BLM welcomes you to explore, enjoy, and make positive memories from your outdoor experiences on America's public lands and waters. Please remember these are wide-open spaces and wildlands. Plan ahead and be aware of potential hazards. It is everyone's responsibility to take the necessary steps to minimize chances of becoming lost or injured on public lands.
 

When visiting public lands, please also practice Leave No Trace and Tread Lightly principles.
 

For other key advice on various recreation activities, please see the BLM's trip-planning tips. These helpful tips can help you make the most of your recreation experience. However, for more information about local conditions, regulations and recreation resources, there is no substitute for visiting the closest BLM office.