Coso Range Wilderness

Phone:
Address:

Bureau of Land Manage Ridgecrest Field Office Ridgecrest, CA 93555

Latitude/Longitude:
-117.850474, 36.265794
Directions:

Access from the north and east is via State Highway 190, east of Olancha, and then along four-wheel drive routes SE9, SE10, or Centennial Canyon. Access on the west side is via U.S. Highway 395 east of Olancha and along Cactus Flat Road and numerous other four-wheel drive routes.

WILDERNESS
PHOTOGRAPHY
CAMPING
HIKING
HORSEBACK RIDING
HUNTING
WILDLIFE VIEWING

Coso Range Wilderness

Coso Ranfe Wilderness

Encompassing the northern section of the Coso Range, this Wilderness preserves an area of extensive erosion revealing outstanding displays of volcanic formations and numerous valleys and washes. From high points--primarily Joshua Flat in the east-central portion--you'll discover great views east into the Sierra Nevada and north into Owens Valley.

In addition to Joshua Flat, striking Vermillion Canyon runs west from near the middle of the area, offering an especially scenic reason to make the trek. Cactus Flat and McCloud Flat to the south were once active mining regions. You'll see large stands of Joshua trees mixed with low desert shrubs, annuals, cactuses, and creosote bushes. Old tracks lead from the east to Joshua Flat and from the west to Vermillion Canyon. There is ample room to wander without much chance of seeing another human. Carry plenty of water.

For more information about this wilderness, please visit Wilderness Connect.

Leave No Trace

How to follow the seven standard Leave No Trace principles differs in different parts of the country (desert vs. Rocky Mountains). For more information on any of the principles listed below, please visit Leave No Trace, Visit the Leave No Trace, Inc. website.

  • Plan Ahead and Prepare
  • Travel and Camp on Durable Surfaces
  • Dispose of Waste Properly
  • Leave What You Find
  • Minimize Campfire Impacts
  • Respect Wildlife
  • Be Considerate of Other Visitors

Rules and Regulations

Motorized equipment and equipment used for mechanical transport are generally prohibited on all federal lands designated as wilderness. This includes the use of motor vehicles (including OHVs), motorboats, motorized equipment, bicycles, hang gliders, wagons, carts, portage wheels, and the landing of aircraft including helicopters, unless provided for in specific legislation. In a few areas some exceptions allowing the use of motorized equipment or mechanical transport are described in the special regulations in effect for a specific area. Contact the agency for more information about regulations.