BLM to transfer wildland fire engines to three rural fire readiness partners in Arizona

PHOENIX - The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will be transferring wildland fire engines to three rural wildland firefighting partners in Arizona. The Arizona Strip District to transfer a fire engine to the Colorado City Fire Department; the Colorado River District to transfer a fire engine to the Pinion Pine Fire District; and the Gila District will transfer a fire engine to the Pima Volunteer Fire Department.

The engines will be transferred under BLM’s Rural Fire Readiness (RFR) program, which is designed to provide wildland fire equipment to local wildland firefighting partners at no cost to increase the capability and capacity of local cooperators and increases the safety and effectiveness of the collaborative wildland fire response.

“We appreciate and value the assistance our local, rural and volunteer fire departments provide us across the state,” said BLM Arizona State Director Ray Suazo, “These equipment transfers enhance our already strong cooperative working relationship, as it brings more fire resources to the fight regardless of jurisdiction.” 

Community partnerships between the BLM and local fire departments are crucial to wildfire response on private, state, and federal lands that support grazing, recreation, wildlife, and other values important to local economies.

The BLM accepts RFR applications from local fire departments for available vehicles, equipment, and supplies, and transfers excess items to local fire departments in the months ahead of the next fire season.

For more information on the RFR program, contact your local BLM office and visit the BLM Rural Fire Readiness webpage at: https://www.blm.gov/programs/public-safety-and-fire/rural-fire-readiness-program.

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $111 billion in economic output across the country in fiscal year 2019—more than any other agency in the Department of the Interior. These activities supported more than 498,000 jobs.

Release Date

Organization

Bureau of Land Management

Office

Arizona State Office

Contacts

Name:
Dolores Garcia, Public Affairs Specialist