BLM conducts aerial seeding on 90,000 acres of the Martin Fire

WINNEMUCCA, Nev. – Over the past week, the BLM has been working in coordination with CO Fire Aviation to re-establish sagebrush over 90,000 acres burned by the 2018 Martin Fire. The Martin Fire was largest fire in Nevada history and burned through portions of mature wildlife-rich sagebrush habitat.

“This area in Northern Nevada is one of the largest remaining expanses of sagebrush steppe in the Western States. It is critical habitat for the animals that live there such as elk, mule deer, pronghorn antelope, Greater sage-grouse and numerous others,” said District Fire Management Officer, Donovan Walker.

Utilizing an Air Tractor 602 (AT-602) nearly 30,000 pounds of sagebrush seed was flown from the Winnemucca airport to the valleys and hillsides burned in the fire. The AT-602 is an agricultural aircraft capable of a variety of functions including aerial spraying, fire suppression and seeding. The AT-602 is owned and operated by CO Fire Aviation, a company that specializes in aerial wildfire suppression and rehabilitation.

“This is one of many efforts that the BLM and our partners, including the Nevada Department of Wildlife, Nevada Division of Forestry, and numerous nonprofit organizations, is undertaking to return a portion of Northern Nevada back into the once touted sagebrush sea,” added District Manager, Ester McCullough.


The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in the 11 Western states and Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals.

Release Date

Organization

Bureau of Land Management

Office

Humboldt Field Office

Contacts

Name:
Heather O'Hanlon
Phone: