BLM aerially seeds 8,000-plus acre Brown Fire as part of ESR plan

Brown Fire ESR plan one of eight in eastern Nevada

ELY, Nev. – The Bureau of Land Management Ely District in January finished aerially seeding nearly all of the 8,268 acres of the public and private lands burned in last June’s Brown Fire, south and east of Lund, Nev.

A member of the contract crew connects a seed-filled hopper to the helicopter. The seed mixer can be partly seen in the foreground. Seed mixes vary depending on which portion of a fire is seeded.  Factors that can determine a seed mix include burn severity, soil type, elevation, slope, annual precipitation, and pre-existing vegetation.
A member of the contract crew connects a seed-filled hopper to the helicopter. The seed mixer can be partly seen in the foreground. Seed mixes vary depending on which portion of a fire is seeded. Factors that can determine a seed mix include burn severity, soil type, elevation, slope, annual precipitation, and pre-existing vegetation.

The 8,000-acre seeding, which took three days to complete, is part of the district’s Emergency Stabilization and Rehabilitation (ESR) plan. Other plan components are a 3,000-acre drill seeding with fire-resistant strips along 12 miles of roadway, fence repair, temporary fence construction and a temporary grazing closure. The treatments will be monitored for three years to determine their effectiveness.

The Brown Fire over five days in late June 2020 burned approximately 8,268 acres of public and privately-owned lands located south and east of Lund, Nev. The cause of the fire is unknown.
The Brown Fire over five days in late June 2020 burned approximately 8,268 acres of public and privately-owned lands located south and east of Lund, Nev. The cause of the fire is unknown.

The District has developed ESR plans for eight of last season’s wildfires, the Bishop, Meadow Valley, Miller, Stewart Canyon and Twin fires in Lincoln County, and Baldy, Brown and Flat fires in White Pine County.

 

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $111 billion in economic output across the country in fiscal year 2019—more than any other agency in the Department of the Interior. These activities supported more than 498,000 jobs.

Release Date

Organization

Bureau of Land Management

Office

Ely District Office

Contacts

Name:
Chris Hanefeld
Phone: