Salem Record of Decision and Resource Management Plan

Salem Record of Decision

Salem District Resource Management Plan Table of Contents:

- Tables

- Maps

- Appendices

Wildlife Habitat


Objectives

See Late-Successional Reserve, Riparian Reserve and Matrix objectives.

Enhance and maintain biological diversity and ecosystem health in order to contribute to healthy wildlife populations.

Land Use Allocations

The land use allocations in this resource management plan are designed to benefit wildlife species, in the aggregate, that use the various seral stages and other habitat areas of the forest.

Management Actions/Direction —

All Land Use Allocations

Use the watershed analysis process to address wildlife habitat issues for individual watersheds. The analysis will help to resolve any concerns identified in applying management actions/direction in this section and those in the Special Status and SEIS Special Attention Species and Habitat section. Where appropriate, wildlife habitat enhancement opportunities will be identified through this process. Types of enhancement opportunities include providing downed wood, gating and/or obliterating roads, seeding elk forage, creating permanent elk forage areas, creating snags, and restoring wetlands.

Coordinate with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife during planning and implementation of wildlife habitat enhancement projects.

Cooperate with federal, tribal and state wildlife management agencies to identify and eliminate impacts associated with habitat manipulation, poaching, and other activities that threaten the continued existence and distribution of native wildlife inhabiting federal lands.

Management Actions/Direction —

Riparian Reserves

Design and implement wildlife habitat restoration and enhancement activities in a manner that contributes to attainment of Aquatic Conservation Strategy objectives.

Design, construct and operate wildlife interpretive and other user-enhancement facilities, such as interpretive trails, in a manner that does not retard or prevent attainment of Aquatic Conservation Strategy objectives. For existing wildlife interpretative and other user-enhancement facilities inside Riparian Reserves, ensure that Aquatic Conservation Strategy objectives are met. Where Aquatic Conservation Strategy objectives cannot be met, relocate or close such facilities.

Cooperate with federal, tribal, and state wildlife management agencies to identify and eliminate wild ungulate impacts that are inconsistent with attainment of Aquatic Conservation Strategy objectives.

Management Actions/Direction —

Late-Successional Reserves

Design projects to improve conditions for wildlife if they provide late-successional habitat benefits or if their effect on late-successional associated species is negligible.

If introduction of a nonnative species is proposed, complete an assessment of impacts and avoid any introduction that would retard or prevent achievement of Late-Successional Reserve objectives.

Evaluate impacts of nonnative species existing within Late-Successional Reserves.

Develop plans and recommendations for eliminating or controlling nonnative species which are inconsistent with Late-Successional Reserve objectives. Include an analysis of effects of implementing such programs on other species within Late-Successional Reserves.

Management Actions/Direction —

Matrix

(General Forest Management Area and Connectivity/Diversity Blocks)

Retain snags within a timber harvest unit at levels sufficient to support species of cavity-nesting birds at 40 percent of potential population levels. Meet the 40 percent minimum throughout the Matrix with per acre requirements met on average areas no larger than 40 acres.

Management Actions/Direction —

General Forest Management Area

Retain late-successional forest patches in landscape areas where little late-successional forest persists. This management action/direction will be applied in fifth field watersheds (20 to 200 square miles) in which federal forest lands are currently comprised of 15 percent or less late-successional forest. (The assessment of 15 percent will include all federal land allocations in a watershed.) Within such an area, protect all remaining late-successional forest stands. Protection of these stands could be modified in the future when other portions of a watershed have recovered to the point where they could replace the ecological roles of these stands.

Retain six to eight green conifer trees per acre after regeneration harvest. Retained trees will be distributed in variable patterns (e.g., single trees, clumps and strips) to contribute to stand diversity.

In addition to the previous green tree retention management action/direction, retain green trees for snag recruitment in harvest units where there is an identified, near-term (less than three decades) snag deficit. These trees do not count toward green-tree retention requirements.

In a cutting area, leave a minimum of 240 linear feet of logs per acre, averaged over the area and reflecting the species mix of the original stand. All logs will be at least 20 inches in diameter at the large end, and be at least 20 feet in length. Logs will be distributed throughout a cutting area, and not piled or concentrated in a few areas. Existing decay class 1 and 2 logs count toward this requirement. Where this management action/direction cannot be met with existing coarse woody debris, merchantable material will be used to make up the deficit.

Management Actions/Direction —

Connectivity/Diversity Blocks

Provide Connectivity/Diversity Blocks spaced throughout the BLM land base. Manage the blocks as follows:

  • Maintain 25 to 30 percent of each block in late-successional forest at any point in time. The percentage of habitat will include habitat in other allocations, such as Riparian Reserves. Blocks may be comprised of contiguous or noncontiguous BLM-administered lands. The size and arrangement of habitat within a block should provide effective habitat to the extent possible.
  • Retain 12 to 18 green conifer trees per acre when an area is regeneration harvested. Distribute the retained trees in variable patterns (e.g., single trees, clumps and strips) to contribute to stand diversity. The management goal for the retained trees and subsequent density management is recovery of old-growth characteristics in approximately 100 to 120 years.
  • In a cutting area, leave a minimum of 240 linear feet of logs per acre, averaged over the area and reflecting the species mix of the original stand. All logs will be at least 20 inches in diameter at the large end, and be at least 20 feet in length. Logs will be distributed throughout a cutting area, and not piled or concentrated in a few areas. Existing decay class 1 and 2 logs count toward this requirement. Where this management action/direction cannot be met with existing coarse woody debris, merchantable material will be used to make up the deficit.

Management Actions/Direction —

Special Habitats

Using interdisciplinary teams, identify special habitat areas and determine relevant values for protection or management on a case-by-case basis. Of particular importance in these determinations will be the habitat of species for which the SEIS record of decision provides protection buffers or other site-specific management actions/direction.

Use management practices, including fire, to obtain desired vegetation conditions in special habitats.

Management Actions/Direction —

Owls, Other Raptors, and Great Blue Herons

Maintain the integrity of nest sites, centers of activity, or rookeries.

Control human activities, which may disturb or interfere with nesting, within one-quarter mile of active nesting areas from March 1 to August 1.

Install nesting platforms, nest boxes, and other structures to enhance habitat.

Management Actions/Direction —

Roosevelt Elk

In areas with elk habitat, close and rehabilitate roads unneeded for continued resource management or use. A general target for roads open to motorized use is 1.5 miles or less per square mile. Avoid constructing roads in areas with high elk value such as breeding sites.

Through watershed analyses, address public vehicle use of elk habitat areas. The following areas will be given priority for analysis:

Alsea Falls vicinity (700 acres)
Bummer Ridge (2,100 acres)
Clarence Creek area (300 acres)
Dead Horse Canyon (1,600 acres)
East Creek (800 acres)
Elk Creek/Bear Creek area (2,200 acres)
Fall Creek (2,600 acres)
Fan Creek (1,000 acres)
Green Peter Peninsula area (1,900 acres)
Homestead Road area (1,700 acres)
Little North Fork Wilson River area (500 acres)
North Fork Siletz River area (6,400 acres)
Skunk Creek (700 acres)
Tillamook Ridge (700 acres)

Keep major game trails clear of slash accumulations caused by thinning projects.

Conduct forage seeding in habitat areas (200 to 500 acres per year) with appropriate seed beds and where compatible with other management objectives.

Management Actions/Direction —

Golden Eagles

Protect 30 acres around known nest sites. Protection measures will include no habitat removal and no human disturbance from March 1 to August 15.