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Last Updated:
02/09/2011 10:38:50 MST
FAQs 
 
 
 


Q: What will be addressed in the travel and recreation implementation plan?

A: The travel and recreation implementation plan process will identify specific recreation actions and decisions, including:

  • Route evaluation for individual motorized and non-motorized routes in Travel Management Areas
  • Visitor services and facilities to be provided
  • Locations for competitive races and events
  • Updates to the Special Recreation Permit process
  • Enforcement and monitoring of recreation activities
  • Development of educational and interpretive information and materials
  • Use restrictions and fees
  • Potential partnerships


Q: What is a Recreation Area Management Plan (RAMP)?

A: A Recreation Area Management Plan (RAMP) is a document that identifies goals and actions for recreation in a specific area. While the Las Vegas Resource Management Plan provides the overall guidance for recreation, the RAMPs will identify the actions that are necessary to manage a variety of recreational activities and implement recreation programs for each recreation area. CTTM addresses transportation and travel management.


Q: What is the Comprehensive Transportation and Travel Management Program (CTTM)?

A: The BLM uses the Comprehensive Travel and Transportation Management program (CTTM) to proactively manage public access and natural resources on BLM lands. CTTM evaluates the effects that all forms of motorized and non-motorized travel have on public lands, natural resources, and the recreational users. It involves a comprehensive approach that considers various aspects of road and trail system planning and management, including route evaluation. CTTM addresses all uses of routes, including recreational, traditional, casual, agricultural, commercial, and educational uses. Although historically focused on motor vehicle use, CTTM also encompasses non-motorized travel (foot, horseback and other livestock), mechanized vehicles (such as bicycles), and motorized and non-motorized boats.



Q: How will the RAMPs fit in with the ongoing Resource Management Plan (RMP) revision?

A: The RAMPs will be developed in conjunction with the current Resource Management Plan (RMP) Revision for the Las Vegas and Pahrump Field Offices, which started in January 2010. The RMP Revision will identify broad recreation guidance and objectives for BLM lands within the Las Vegas and Pahrump Field Offices, including:

  • Designation of recreation management areas;
  • Establishment of recreation and visitor service objectives for each recreation area;
  • Identification of allowable uses for each recreation area; and
  • Overall route designations (open, closed, designated). 

The travel and recreation implementation plan process will identify specific recreation actions and decisions, including:

  • Route evaluation for individual motorized and non-motorized routes in Travel Management Areas
  • Visitor services and facilities to be provided
  • Locations for competitive races and events
  • Updates to the Special Recreation Permit process
  • Enforcement and monitoring of recreation activities
  • Development of educational and interpretive information and materials
  • Use restrictions and fees
  • Potential partnerships 

Close coordination between the development of the RAMPs and the RMP Revision will ensure that the recommendations in the RAMPs do not conflict with the management objectives and land use decisions in the RMP Revision. 



Q: What is the planning area for the plan?

A: The planning area is located in Southern Nevada and encompasses approximately 3.4 million acres of public land.  RAMPs will be developed for recreation areas within the Las Vegas Field Office area in Clark County, NV. These areas include: Gold Butte, Logandale, Las Vegas Valley, Muddy Mountains, Jean Lake/Roach Lake, Clark County North, Clark County West, and Clark County South.

The planning area is bordered by:

  • To the east:  Lake Mead National Recreation Area; Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument; Mojave County, Arizona; and lands managed by the BLM’s Arizona Strip Field Office
  • To the north:  Desert National Wildlife Range; the Air Force’s Nevada Test and Training Range; Department of Energy’s Nevada Test Site; Lincoln County, Nevada; and lands managed by the BLM’s Caliente Field Office
  • To the west:  San Bernardino County, California; and public lands managed by the BLM’s Barstow and Pahrump Field Offices
  • To the south:  Mojave National Preserve and public lands managed by BLM’s Needles and Kingman Field Offices 

The planning area surrounds, but does not include:

  • Spring Mountains National Recreation Area
  • Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area
  • Sloan Canyon National Conservation Area
  • Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge 

The travel and recreation implementation plan will incorporate other planning efforts started or completed prior to the start of this planning effort (i.e. Area of Critical Environmental Concern [ACEC] and Wilderness Plans) and can provide additional guidance for those plans if scoping identifies major recreation issues that need to be addressed within the ACECs or wilderness areas. There will be no transportation and travel planning for routes on non-BLM owned lands, for BLM National Conservation Area or Wilderness areas, or for ACECs in which route designation has already occurred.  Travel designations that are already in place will be adopted in the travel and recreation implementation plan.  

The BLM will coordinate with adjacent lands managed by other Federal, state and local agencies. The ultimate goal is to have recreation opportunities and a route network across National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Nevada Department of State Parks, and BLM land that provide consistent management, route continuity, and the protection of natural resources.  



Q: How can I get involved?

A: Public involvement is central to the travel and recreation implementation plan process. If you want to be involved in the travel and recreation implementation plan process, the following opportunities are available:

  • Request to be added to the project mailing list (via email, phone, fax, or postal mail)
  • Attend a public meeting during the scoping period
  • Submit comments during the scoping period
  • Participate in an alternatives development workshop
  • Attend a public meeting after the Draft EIS is released
  • Submit comments on the Draft EIS during the public comment period
  • Review the Final EIS after it is released 



Q: How will the project impact me?

A: The travel and recreation implementation plan will determine on-the-ground management actions and implementation of recreation activities, which will directly affect recreation in the planning area. For instance, the plan will determine which OHV routes and access roads to leave open and which to close; maps, brochures, websites and other interpretation and education materials to be developed; the implementation of permits, use restrictions, and fees; and services and facilities to provide throughout the planning area.  



Q: What is the timeline for the project?

A: The project will take approximately three years to complete, beginning in January 2011. Throughout the project, stakeholders will have many opportunities to participate and share their insights and comments. 



Q: What issues and opportunities have already been identified? 

A: Preliminary issues and opportunities that have already been identified by the BLM for the travel and recreation implementation plan include: 

  • How visitors’ activities will be managed in a manner that protects the cultural and natural resources while providing reasonable access;
  • Facilities and infrastructure that will be needed to provide visitor services, information/interpretation, and administration of recreation opportunities;
  • How transportation and travel management and route designations will be incorporated into long-term goals for recreation and other resource needs;
  • How the RAMPs will be responsive to continually changing conditions, stemming primarily from an increasing urban interface;
  • How recreation will be managed in a manner that is compatible with the plans and needs of Native American tribes and other local, state, and federal agencies;
  • How the RAMPSs will integrate with other federal, regional and local plans;
  • Where urban trails can connect to federal lands;
  • Effect rights-of-way authorizations and land sales will have on recreation opportunities; and
  • How the Las Vegas Perimeter Open Space and Trail concept, located primarily on BLM lands, should be considered. 



Q: What are the most useful comments?

A: BLM is interested in your comments regarding this plan.  The following information would be the most useful:

  • Are there additional issues, concerns, or opportunities (not already identified) that BLM should consider?
  • Are there recreation programs, services, or facilities you would like to be developed?
  • Which hiking, mountain biking, equestrian, or OHV routes are most important to your recreation experience?

Tips for making effective comments:

  • Be brief so the reviewer does not miss the point of your comment.
  • Be specific so the reviewer clearly understands your concerns.  Say “I am concerned about how this will affect…” rather than just saying “Don’t do this.”
  • Know your subject so the comments are both focused and accurate.
  • State the facts and back them up where possible.  Be sure to reveal your sources of information to help make your point.
  • Be honest and realistic.  Distortions of facts or misstatements may cause the reviewer to question the accuracy of your other statements.  Requests that are not legal or feasible also reduce the credibility of your comments.
  • Be polite.  Even though you may be upset about a proposal, try to state your opinion objectively.  Communication is increased by extending the same courtesies to Agency staff that you expect from them.
  • Please note that petitions and form letters are only counted as one comment. 



Q: How can I submit comments?

A: The public may submit comments, request additional information, or request to be put on the mailing list by submitting such information to LVFO_RAMPS@blm.gov or to the Las Vegas Field Office:  

Attn: Marilyn Peterson
Bureau of Land Management
4701 N. Torrey Pines Dr.
Las Vegas, NV  89130
Fax: (702) 515-5023 

NOTE:  If you provide written comments and wish to withhold your name or street address from public review or from disclosure under the Freedom of Information Act, you must state this prominently at the beginning of your written comment.  Such requests will be honored to the extent allowed by law.  All submissions from organizations and businesses and from individuals identifying themselves as representatives of officials of organizations will be available for public inspection in their entirety.