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State Herd Area: Reveille (NV)
REVEILLE HERD MANAGEMENT AREA, NV Location/Habitat The Reveille Herd Management Area (HMA) is located 50 miles east of Tonopah and 12 miles south of Warm Springs, Nevada, in Nye County. The area consists of 126,320 acres and encompasses an area 17 miles wide and 10 miles long. This HMA is typical of the Great Basin region characterized by north-south trending mountain ranges. Significant features are large flat valley bottoms and steep mountains with elevations ranging from 5,000 feet in the Reveille Valley to over 9,400 feet on Kawich Mountain. The area receives 5 inches of annual precipitation in the valley bottoms. The mountain tops can receive as much as 16 inches, but the average is 4 to 8 inches. Vegetation The vegetation consists primarily of pinyon-juniper woodlands, low sagebrush, and mountain-mahogany. The alluvial fans in the lower elevations and valley bottoms have low sagebrush, saltbush, and a variety of annual and perennial grasses and forbs. Noteworthy species include Indian ricegrass, needle-and-thread grass, galleta grass, sand dropseed, bottlebrush squirreltail, winterfat (white sage), fourwing saltbush, shadscale, greenmolly kochia, and bud sagebrush. Weeds include halogeton and Russian-thistle. The HMA is dominated by pinyon-juniper woodlands and sagebrush. These vegetation types are among the least productive in terms of grass production. Horses generally prefer grass species over all other plants. Herd Description A significant portion of the Reveille wild horse herd has established residency outside the HMA, demonstrating that the habitat needs of the wild horses may not be met within the HMA boundaries at the current appropriate management level (AML) of 145 to165 animals. Competition for forage, water, and space, combined with the lack of restrictive barriers, as well as poor habitat conditions, have resulted in many of the animals spending only a part of their life cycle within the court designated–explain-- "Blue Line" boundary for the HMA.
 
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