U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIORBUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT
Wyoming
 
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A Partnership in Education and Interpretation: 
National Historic Trails Interpretive Center and Anasazi Heritage Center

Paria Canyon.

Paria Canyon – Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness Area, Utah. The photograph, by BLM photographer Bob Wick, is part of a temporary exhibit created by the National Historic Trails Interpretive Center, in Casper, Wy. The exhibit celebrates the 10th anniversary of the National landscape Conservation System, and is currently on display at the Anasazi Heritage Center, a BLM museum located near Delores, Co.

Duck Decoy, estimated to be 2,500 years old. The decoy was preserved in a Nevada cave, and discovered by archeologists in 1924. An image of this ancient decoy is part of the exhibit, "America’s Priceless Heritage: Snapshots in Time." The exhibit is currently on display at the National Historic Trails Center, and on loan from the Anasazi Heritage Center.

Two of the BLM's premier educational centers – the Anasazi Heritage Center in Colorado, and the National Historic Trails Interpretive Center in Wyoming – exchanged temporary exhibits that focused on the conservation of BLM lands. Both exhibits are currently on display, and will be showcased through December, 2010.

The Trails Center created an exhibit to recognize the 10th anniversary of the National Landscape Conservation System (NLCS). The exhibit, entitled "National Landscape Conservation System: Preserve, Protect, Restore" was displayed throughout the summer of 2010.

The exhibit features the photography of BLM photographer Bob Wick. Wick’s photos are unique, in that he expands the boundaries of American landscape photography, and captures photographs of areas that have been seldom visited.

"The BLM’s National Landscape Conservation System is still a frontier as far as landscape photography is concerned, with many new angles and un-photographed areas awaiting more adventurous photographers, "Wick said.

The NLCS includes over 886 federally recognized areas and approximately 27 million acres of national monuments, national conservation areas, wilderness study areas, wild and scenic rivers, conservation lands of the California desert, and national scenic and historic trails.

The exhibit is currently on display at the Anasazi Heritage Center, an archeological museum operated by the BLM since 1988. The Center is a museum of the Anasazi culture and other American Indian cultures, and is located near Delores, Colo.

The Trails Center borrowed an exhibit from the Anasazi Heritage Center entitled, "America's Priceless Heritage: Snapshots in Time."

"America's Priceless Heritage" is a photo exhibit, created by the Smithsonian Institution and the BLM to recognize the 100th anniversary of the Antiquities Act of 1906. The Act, signed into law by President Theodore Roosevelt, was designed to protect archeological and historic properties on public lands.

The exhibit features 21 images of sites and artifacts, including photographs of 170-million-year old dinosaur tracks in Utah, Navajo dwellings in New Mexico, and Capt. William Clark’s stone signature in Montana. Ten states are represented in the exhibit: Utah, Alaska, Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, Idaho, Colorado, Montana, Washington and California.

The exhibit is currently on display at the Trails Center, and will be showcased through December, 2010.

The National Historic Trails Interpretive Center is a cooperative partnership between the BLM, the National Historic Trails Center Foundation and the City of Casper. The Trails Center interprets the significant role of the area’s historic trails in the history of the United States, and seeks to promote public understanding of both America’s western Native Cultures and historic westward expansion, while highlighting BLM's role as active stewards of public lands.

The exchange of exhibits between the Trails Center and the Anasazi Heritage Center represents a wonderful partnership in education and interpretation between two BLM centers. Visitors had the opportunity to learn more about archeology, conservation, and preservation on BLM areas, these treasured lands of the American people.


 
Last updated: 12-22-2010