U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIORBUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT
Wyoming
 
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Archaeological Technician Kay Hammer talks about prehistoric artifacts,
Archaeological Technician Kay Hammer talks about prehistoric artifacts.
Wildlife Biologist Chris Sheets instructs children on the differences between antlers and horns.
Wildlife Biologist Chris Sheets instructs children on the differences between antlers and horns.
Mills Boys and Girls Club members learning about bears.
Mills Boys and Girls Club members learning about bears.
Mills Boys and Girls Club members having a little fun while learning.
Mills Boys and Girls Club members having a little fun while learning.
Anthony Wichman and Violet Wright try out the Bighorn Sheep skull.
Anthony Wichman and Violet Wright try out the Bighorn Sheep skull.
Mills Boys and Girls Club and BLM Visit Bessemer Bend

By Jim Wright, Wildlife Biologist, Casper Field Office & Lesley Collins, Public Affairs Specialist, High Plains District

Kids from the Mills Chapter of the Boys and Girls Club spent a day outside this summer at the Bessemer Bend Interpretive Site.

On July 31, 2009, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Casper Field office hosted an Educational Outreach Program group at the site on the on the North Platte River west of Casper, Wyo. Bessemer Bend was the last crossing of the North Platte River for western immigrants. The site has interpretive signs and a picnic area all located along the river.

Kids, ranging in age from five to 12 years, listened to lectures and participated in field activities about wildlife and archeological resources. BLM Archaeologist Brian Wygal made the kids honorary archaeologists for the day as they searched for and identified prehistoric artifacts, including stone tools and arrowheads.

BLM Wildlife Biologist Jim Wright grabbed the kids’ attention with his hands-on presentation about bears in Wyoming. The group was encouraged to handle various skins and skulls. The kids were especially excited about the size of the bear claws and teeth. One youngster proudly noted that the bears’ claws were extra long to help them dig for food.

“This was a great opportunity to get kids outside to learn about Wyoming’s abundant wildlife,” noted Wright.

BLM lecturers included Jim Wright, Wildlife Biologist; Christopher Sheets, Wildlife Biologist; Brian Wygal, Archaeologist; and Kay Hammer, Archaeological Technician.

Photos by Tom Foertsch, Geologist & Kay Hammer, Archaeology Technician, Casper Field Office


 
Last updated: 11-25-2009