BLM Logo
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT NEWS RELEASE
Trails Center
 
Release Date: 06/15/11
Contacts: Lesley A. Collins    
  307-261-7603    

Trails Center Announces Patio Talks on Pioneer and Wyoming History


The National Historic Trails Interpretive Center (NHTIC) is hosting afternoon programs on pioneer and Wyoming history this summer.

The presentations, held on the Trails Center’s patio, will last for approximately 30 minutes, are free, and open to the public. During inclement weather, the programs will be held inside.

“These talks will help enrich the visitors’ experience during our busy summer season,” said Trails Center Director Mike Abel. “We encourage the local community to participate in these family-friendly programs.”

June 25, 1 p.m.: In the Footsteps of Your Own Family History Trail: Genealogy
The study of our own family history can influence how we view many aspects of our lives as well as the world around us. Have you ever wondered about the generations of your family that lived before you? Join Susan Haines for a basic introduction on the subject of family history research and the first steps you need to take to follow this fascinating trail.

June 26, 1 p.m.: Red Cloud’s War
Red Cloud, an Oglala Lakota Chief, gave the United States government an ultimatum: stay out of the Powder River country of Wyoming. Red Cloud's war, which occurred between 1866 and 1868, stands out in U.S. military history as the only war won by American Indians against the U.S. Join us as Trails Center interpreter Kylie McCormick sheds light on the war that provided a brief victory for Red Cloud's warriors before they were forced onto reservations.

July 3, 1 p.m.: Getting Dressed: Women’s Pioneer Clothing
When women dressed for their journey, they often had to improvise. Limited space forced many to wear all the clothing they owned on their back. Please join us, as an interpreter in period dress will demonstrate, present, and display pioneer women’s clothing.

July 9, 1 p.m.: Red Cloud’s War
Red Cloud, an Oglala Lakota Chief, gave the U.S. government an ultimatum: Stay out of the Powder River country of Wyoming. Red Cloud's War, which occurred between 1866 and 1868, stands out in U.S. military history as the only war that won by American Indians against the U.S. Join us as Trails Center interpreter Kylie McCormick sheds light on the war that provided a brief victory for Red Cloud's warriors before they were forced onto reservations.

July 10, 1 p.m.: A History of Americana Music
Music, oh the sound of music! Come clap your hands, tap your feet, and enjoy local musical talents Kim, Ana, and Rachel Merchant perform and present the history of many popular tunes of the pioneer era.

July 16, 1 p.m.: Basket Weaving: Stories Shared through Time
Basket weaving is an ancient craft. No one knows exactly how old it is. The technique of weaving has been shared, re-discovered, and expanded throughout the years and is still being altered today. Join us as an interpreter in period dress presents the beautiful art of basket weaving.

July 17, 1 p.m.: Pioneer Women and the American Indian
Pioneer women and American Indians met, sometimes in friendship, sometimes in conflict. False rumors of constant Indian threats and periodic massacres of wagon trains abounded by 1850, always obscuring the larger relationship that was based upon mutually beneficial trade, cooperation, and friendship. Join us as an interpreter, dressed in period clothing, confronts some of these misunderstandings and unveils a fresh perspective.

July 23, 1 p.m.: Civil War Equipment: A Study in Contrast
The U.S. Civil War was a monumental event that shaped American history. Between 1861 and 1865, the Civil War also brought into use several new military technologies. Join us as a historian compares and contrasts the equipment of the Union soldier to that of the Confederate soldier using replica and genuine artifacts, accoutrements, and clothing of the American Civil War.

July 24, 1 p.m.: New Beginnings: The Pioneer Experience!
As pioneers embarked on their journey west, many crucial decisions had to be made. These early practical choices and evaluations of the trail concerning routes, food, methods of traveling, and supplies often were the difference between life and death. Join us as an interpreter in period clothing discusses the arduous challenges pioneers encountered.

July 30, 1 p.m.: Pioneer Cooking: Dutch oven Style
Making wise choices among the array of foods available in the mid-nineteenth century was crucial to pioneers traveling West. Join us as an interpreter dressed in period clothing discusses the various food items of choice and the use of the most important cooking utensil on the wagon or pack animal, the Dutch oven.

July 31, 1 p.m.: Putting Lightning to Work
Learn how the simple harnessing of electricity brought a nation together at a critical time in our history! Telegraphy set the stage for modern communication 150 years ago, and we still rely on its principle of operation to communicate across the continent today. What did the first telegraph message say? Who sent the first message from Salt Lake City, when the line reached there in October 1861? Try your hand at keying and deciphering a message in code, as we reflect on how far we have come as a nation of communicators since those first messages were sent through "the talking wire!"

For more information about patio talks, contact Jason Vlcan at the NHTIC, (307) 261-7780.

The NHTIC is a part of the BLM's National Landscape Conservation System (NLCS). The areas of the NLCS are specifically designed to conserve, protect and restore the exceptional scientific, natural, cultural, ecological, historical, and recreation values of these treasured landscapes.

The NHTIC is a public-private partnership between the BLM and the National Historic Trails Center Foundation. The facility is located at 1501 N. Poplar Street, Casper, Wyo. The Center is currently operating on summer hours, and is open daily, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.



The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land, the most of any Federal agency. This land, known as the National System of Public Lands, is primarily located in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The BLM's mission is to manage and conserve the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations under our mandate of multiple-use and sustained yield. In Fiscal Year 2013, the BLM generated $4.7 billion in receipts from public lands.
--BLM--

Trails Center   1501 North Poplar Street      Casper, WY 82601  

Last updated: 06-28-2011