Science and Children >  > Wild Bunch > Poster 
The Wild Bunch 
Bureau of Land Management Environmental Education Resource

INTRODUCTION

ARTICLE

HORSE TALES

ACTIVITIES

POSTER

POSTER BACK

HORSE SENSE

CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
& REFERENCES

Based on an article in Science & Children Magazine, Published by the National Science Teachers Association, May 2001

Artist's depiction of wild horses and four cultures linked to wild horses and the American West.

The figures in the poster represent four cultures that were linked to the wild horses of the American West: the Spanish conquistadors; Native American Plains Indians; troopers of the 9th Cavalry regiment, "Buffalo Soldiers"; and modern day Anglo-American wranglers. The poster depicts the different breeds and basic types of coloration found among wild horses: (1) Kiger, (2) gray, (3) sorrel, (4) palomino, (5) bay, (6) pinto pony, (7) palomino, (8) buckskin, (9) sorrel, (10) sorrel, (11) black, (12) bay, (13) gray, (14) black, (15) buckskin, (16) bay, (17) bay, (18) pinto, (19) white (not albino), (20) Appaloosa. Two types of spring and summer forage are depicted on the poster: western wheatgrass (21) and bluebunch wheatgrass (22). During the winter months when the snow becomes too deep, horses are unable to push it aside to uncover grass. As a result, they will eat shrubs such as bitterbrush, winterfat, and four-wing saltbush for their high protein content. None of these is illustrated. Sagebrush (23) is shown but is not forage for horses.