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National Wild Horse and Burro Newsletter Logo

Summer/2009

National Wild Horse and Burro Newsletter


United States Department of the Interior

Bureau of Land Management

 

Table of Contents

"Ladybug" and Mom, Janet Tipton. Photo Copyright Steve

"Ladybug", and Janet Tipton.
Copyright Steve Bradley
stevebradleyphotography.com


Saint Mary-of-the-Woods Equine Program - "Leroy Brown" and "Code Red"
Equine Studies Partnership Agreement  

Ladybug

HowDoYouLikeMeNow aka "Bob"
   

If you would like to submit articles for the National Wild Horse and Burro Newsletter, please e-mail articles and photos (at least 300 dpi) to Janet_Neal@blm.gov  or mail to Janet Neal, Bureau of Land Management, P.O. Box 12000, Reno, NV 89520-0006, or phone (775) 861-6614.  

♦ Note from Editor - Submissions may be edited to reduce the length or correct minor issues. After edits, if you would like the final "draft" article sent back for your personal review, please indicate this in your submission.
 
All stories must be about freezemarked mustangs and/or wild burros. Please ensure pictures are sent at the same time the story is (or immediately thereafter) and include the name of each animal and person(s) in the photo. If the photo is copyrighted or requires that credit be given, please indicate so at the time of submission. 

Sally Spencer, BLM National Wild Horse and Burro Marketing Director
Janet Neal, BLM Editor, Designer, and Graphic Artist   


 Saint Mary-of-the-Woods Equine Program

**Note from the Editor - Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) entered into a Equine Studies Partnership Agreement 3 years ago. The College keeps any adoption fee over $25 and the "Save the Mustangs Fund" provides the College with $200 per horse to assist in the care of the Mustangs. The students of the College train the Mustangs and find adopters who can provide good homes. 
 
If you are familiar with a College that has an Equine Studies course or program, a 4-H group, or an organization with similar capabilities and skills that would be interested in entering into an agreement such as this with the BLM, please call Janet Neal (Editor) at 775 861-6614 or e-mail Janet_Neal@blm.gov .

Below are 2 progress reports written by the students of the College as well as a picture of their new equine students. 

"Leroy".

"Leroy." He is so beautiful!.

  
 

My name is Beth. My partner, Valorie, and I have been working with one of the mustangs you sent to Saint Mary-of-the Woods College. We named ours "Leroy Brown" after the Jim Croce song. We both love him so much and he is coming along so quickly. He really likes getting brushed and getting scratched under his chin. We have taught him how to lead and to back and trot in hand. We are working on picking up his feet.
 
He is so beautiful! We are having such a good time with him and I think he is loving all this attention. We both play with him and visit
"Code Red" a new student at Saint Mary's-of the Woods College.

 "Code Red" a new student at Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College. Lauren says, "He is a very intelligent and very curious horse."

him several times a day and he lets us sit in his stall with him while he lays down for his naps. We took a picture of him that we wanted to share with you. I hope you enjoy it. Thank you so much for this wonderful opportunity!


My name is Lauren and I have had the great opportunity to train one of the Mustangs that were provided to our school, Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College in cooperation from the BLM.

I wanted to thank you for giving us the opportunity of be involved in such a wonderful program and course. I have learned so much through our agreement with the BLM and continue to learn every day that I spend with my Mustang. The other students I work with named our mustang "Code Red" for a variety of reasons. I have included a picture of him when he first got here. 

Since I have been working with him he can now tie, lead from both sides, and he allows us  to brush him and pick up three of his four feet. Today we introduced him to wash stalls and the hose.
 
I am very pleased with how much he has progressed. He is a very intelligent horse and very curious, as well. Thank you so much for letting us, the equine students here at Saint-Mary-of-the Woods, continue to have the opportunity to work with these amazing wild horses. I will continue to send you updates and pictures as he progresses throughout the remainder of the year.

Note from Editor: While other requirements must be met, below is a copy of the Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) Equine Studies Partnership Agreement. If you are a school, a 4-H group, or a non-profit organization and are interested in learning more about the program, please call Janet Neal at (775) 861-6614 or e-mail Janet_Neal@blm.gov .



Equine Studies Partnership Agreement 

Name of Responsible Person:   ____________________________________________
                                   
                                                 ____________________________________________
 
                                                 ____________________________________________
 
Office Phone:   ____________ _________  Cell Phone: _____________ ______   Email Address: _____________________________
 
This document serves as a binding agreement between the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and _____________________________________.  This agreement allows the person named above to care for an Untitled Wild Horse(s) until that animal is adopted or returned to the Bureau of Land Management.  The ___________________________ must comply with all applicable Federal Regulations regarding the private maintenance and care of wild horses as listed in the Private Maintenance and Care Agreement (attached) for adopted animals; provide a corral and shelter that meets all BLM regulations for any fostered animals; and perform the following duties:
 
* Provide care and training for ____________ ungentled horses starting on __(date)_________.
 
* Hold a mini adoption to find good homes for the gentled mustangs - Adopters must meet BLM adoption requirements.
 
* Pay the BLM $25 per animal for the adoption fee, ________________ will be entitled to any additional money above the $25.
 
* Help promote the Save the Mustangs Fund and Wild Horse and Burro Program to Alumni and wherever possible.
 
* Contact the BLM immediately if the animal dies, and submit a veterinarian’s report within 7 days.
 
* Properly represent the Wild Horse and Burro Adoption Program’s requirements and ensure that all potential adopters contact the BLM office that services the state where they live.
 
* Maintain possession of that animal and its Health Records until it is released by the BLM to the new adopter, or returned to a temporary adoption site or BLM holding facility.
 
The BLM will:
 
* Provide ___________ ungentled horses by __(date)___________. 

* Provide contacts for students to report progress and ask questions.
 
* Provide $200 per animal for care during training the Mustangs for a total of $___________. Money will come from the Save the Mustangs Fund.
 
* Provide marketing assistance for adoption.
 
* Promote __________  and the training of the ________ horses on a National level.
 
The animals listed below are released to the _________  and will be cared for by them until adopted or returned to the BLM.
 
Freezemark                               Signalment                             
 
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
           
           
_________________________________________________    __________________
Official’s Signature of Organization                                                                Date
 
 
_________________________________________________    ___________________

BLM Official’s Signature                                                                                 Date   


Ladybug
By Janet Tipton, Mustang and Burro Adopter and Owner, BLM Volunteer

Ladybug and I first attended the Color Country Endurance Ride 6 years ago. It was our very first endurance ride.
"Ladybug" and Mom, Janet Tipton. Photo Copyright Steve

"Ladybug", with her adopter and owner, Janet Tipton. 
Copyright - Steve Bradley  stevebradleyphotography.com

That year we rode day 1 and 3 of the Limited Distance portion of the ride. I was worried about finishing on time. We were on our own not knowing anyone or anything other than what I had researched. Ladybug was the only mustang there and the only barefoot horse competing. 
  
Last year was an amazing year for us. We did 680 miles together; including our first 50 mile ride. Ladybug and I finished fourth in the nation in Limited Distance; second in our region and first for Best Condition in our region. Best condition, with all other horses and their riders with years of experience; Best in the Nation; can you believe THAT? Ladybug was still barefoot, and, still is.

Mustangs have incredible hoof walls, typically about an inch and a half thicker than domestics. Ladybug does wear "Renegade" boots when the trail is rocky.
 
The start of this year's endurance ride season, American Endurance Ride Conference (AERC), was April 10-12. Ladybug and I placed in the top 10 during the event and also received Best Condition 2 days and a row.

Here are pictures of some of the other mustangs involved in the Color Country Endurance Ride. All photos were donated by Steve Bradley, photographer, to Intermountain Mustangs and Burros Advisors (IMMBA) for use to help promote the beauty and versatility of Mustangs. Thank you Ladybug for giving me so much of yourself and showing the world what a "little" Mustang can do!




A few other Mustang participants in the Color Country Endurance Ride. 

Color Country Endurance Ride - Vicky Green & "Shiloh". Shiloh is from the Calico Mtn. HMA. Copyright Steve Bradley - stevebradleyphotography.com.

Dineen Wold, adopter and owner of Owyhee Hawkeye. Owyhee Hawkeye is from the Owyhee, ID HMA. Copyright Steve Bradley - stevebradleyphotography.com.

Mark Wood with Mustang, "Muddy Creek Moose", from the Muddy Creek HMA. Copyright Steve Bradley - stevebradleyphotography.com.

Torgils Wold on Mustang, Napoleon, from the White Pine HMA.

Color Country Endurance Rider, Vicky Green, and her Mustang "Shiloh". 
 Copyright SteveBradley
stevebradleyphotography.com.

Dineen Wold, adopter and owner of "Owyhee Hawkeye".  Dineen plans on competing in the Tevis Cup with
 Owyhee this year.
Copyright Steve Bradley  stevebradleyphotography.com. 

Mark Wood with Mustang, "Muddy Creek Moose".
Copyright Steve Bradley  stevebradleyphotography.com.

Torgils Wold on Mustang, "Napoleon".
Copyright Steve Bradley
Stevebradleyphotography.com.

 


 
"Bob"
By Judy Ballenger, Mustang Adopter, Owner, Trainer, Founder of the Missouri American Mustang and Burro Association (AMBA)

HowDoYouLikeMeNow aka "Bob" is my 2008 Extreme Mustang Makeover horse. The early days of his gentling and training were reported on the BLM website.

Bob and I met on Friday, June
Judy and "Bob" tackling an embankment leading down to the river. This was the third time Bob had been ridden.

Judy and "Bob" tackling the embankment leading down to the river. This was the third time Bob had been ridden.

13th, 2008. Ten days later we shared our first real touches without me having to sneak them in. Twelve days after that I was sitting on his back! And, two days after that he seemed a little sore to me. After that, I felt I had been pushing him too hard.   
Judy and "Bob" made it to the river.

Judy and "Bob" made it to the river. 


 
We went back to ground training until Bob seemed ready for more intense work. Mustangs are very intelligent and can absorb huge amounts of information and training in a short period of time. There’s so much that can be done from the ground with a young horse.
 
I contacted the Mustang Heritage Foundation (MHF) and adopted Bob as he didn't seem quite ready for the "show ring". One dream ended and another come true.

I feel so passionate about mustangs that I’ve become involved with the MHF and their Trainer Incentive Program (TIP). I have two mares through this program, both 4 year olds, that might not have found homes had I not brought them home to be gentled. So many people do not have the proper facilities required to adopt a wild one. But through the TIP program, people can still experience the thrill of adopting a mustang. Both mares have been adopted and will soon go on to new lives with their respective adopters. I also brought a 2 year old gelding home through the BLM foster program to get him used to living with other horses and "fence broke" for his new adopter, a 14 year old boy. These programs have enabled three more people to experience the joy of owning a mustang.

Do Something Wild – Adopt a Mustang! 
Be Warned Though, They’re Like Potato Chips, You Can’t Have Just One!

"Bob" and Judy warming up in English tack for their show.

"Bob" and Judy warming up in English tack for their show.

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