What You Can Do

There Are Many Ways to Get Involved

o Start by contacting your local extension office, county weed control supervisor, land managers, garden clubs, and nature centers to find out what you can do in your own neighborhood, or while hiking, camping, or visiting the public lands.

o Learn what weeds are in your own neighborhood, and make sure the seeds to these plants are not in your clothes or camping gear. You don't want to introduce these into new areas!

o Check with a local ranger/land manager before starting a backcountry hike. Find out how to identify the problem weed species in the area. Report any infestations you may come across.

o Clean all recreation gear, clothing and shoes before leaving an area to avoid inadvertently taking seeds along to the next campsite, county or state.

o Do not camp in or hike through weed infested areas. Stay on designated trails.

o Drive only on established roads away from weed infested areas (seeds can become embedded in tire treads, traveling to new areas).

o Do not pick flowers or plants. Many noxious weeds have been introduced to new areas because someone thought they were attractive and accidentally spread them.

o Tell your friends and family about this problem.

o If you use pack animals, carry only feed that is certified weed free. At least four days before entering backcountry areas, feed pack animals only food that is certified weed free. Remove weed seeds from pack animals by brushing them thoroughly and cleaning their hooves before transporting. Clean saddles and tack.

Hunters and Anglers Defend Their Favorite Places

Learn how sportsmen and women across the nation are joining forces to defend their favorite places from invasive species.  Download the documentary, Defending Favorite Places -
How Hunters and Anglers Can Stop the Spread of Invasive Species
, shown at right.

 


GET INVOLVED!

Volunteers show off pile of knapweed, Idaho.  BLM photo.

Knapweed under a truck

Field of leafy spurge.  BLM photo.

DVD Cover - Defending Favorite Places