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Partnerships: Federal Agency AML

U.S. Department of the Interior

Office of Environmental Policy and Compliance
Office of Environmental Policy and Compliance (OEPC) provides national and regional leadership and direction in the coordination and development of environmental policy and program evaluation, and provides for a coordinated and unified approach and response to environmental issues that affect multiple bureaus.

Office of Surface Mining
The Office of Surface Mining’s (OSM) AML program mitigates the effects of past mining by aggressively pursuing reclamation of abandoned mines.  While most are abondoned coal mines, non-coal mines may be addressed under certain conditions.

OSM’s Office of Technology Transfer
Office of Technology Transfer (OTT) provides information, links, and downloads of materials appropriate for surface mine design, evaluation, environmental protection, reclamation design, and bond release, and posts information about mining and reclamation conferences, forums, meetings, symposia and workshops.

National Park Service
The National Park Service’s (NPS) Abandoned Mineral Land program inventories sites, eliminates public safety hazards, eliminates or reduces adverse effects on resources, provides education and awareness to the public from the preservation and interpretation of historic and cultural artifacts, and the maintenance of specific abandoned mineral lands for critical wildlife habitat, particularly for threatened and endangered species.

U.S. Geological Survey
As an unbiased, multi-disciplinary science organization that focuses on biology, geography, geology, geospatial information, and water, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is dedicated to the timely, relevant, and impartial study of the landscape, our natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten us.

USGS Geological Research Activities with the U.S. Bureau of Land Management

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Mine-Scarred Lands Initiative
EPA's Mine-Scarred Lands (MSL) Initiative is an effort to improve coordination and collaboration among federal agencies on the cleanup and redevelopment of both hard rock and coal mine-scarred lands.

Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (Superfund)
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) resources relate to the range of environmental risks and challenges from AMLs as well as risk management approaches.

Office of Water
EPA’s Good Samaritan Clean Watershed Act encourages voluntary actions and accelerates restoration of watersheds affected by acid mine runoff from abandoned hardrock mines.

EPA’s Office of Radiation and Indoor Air, Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials From Uranium Mining (TENORM)

U.S. Department of Agriculture

Response and Restoration Team 
The Response and Restoration (R&R) Team aids in the cleanup and restoration of USDA-managed lands.

Forest Service
The Forest Service (FS) restores and reclaims lands and watersheds affected by mining practices. The priority is to make tangible progress in restoring these lands; to balance and prioritize human health and safety issues; to approach restoration on a watershed basis; and to meet Clean Water Act and CERCLA requirements when restoring these lands.

U.S. Department of Defense

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
The Restoration of Abandoned Mine Sites program utilizes the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) environmental authorities to provide technical, planning, and design assistance to Federal and non-Federal interests in carrying out projects to address water quality problems caused by drainage and related activities from abandoned and inactive non-coal mines.

U.S. Department of Labor

Mine Safety and Health Administration
Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) coordinates “Stay Out-Stay Alive.” a national public awareness campaign aimed at warning children and adults about the dangers of exploring and playing on active and abandoned mine sites.