Vermillion Cliffs--Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument
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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT
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BLM Wild Horse & Burro Program LogoCedar Mountain-Onaqui HMA Wild Horse Gathers

Complete as of Feb 28, 2012


Goal of Roundup:

The BLM is planning on gathering an estimated 469 wild horses from the Cedar Mountain and Onaqui Mountain HMAs for treatment of the fertility control drug Porcine Zona Pellucida (PZP-22). There will be limited removal of approximately 79 horses that will be placed in the adoption program or long-term pasture facilities. An estimated 130 mares of the captured wild horses from the Cedar Mountain HMA will be treated and returned to the range with an estimated 131 Studs. Onaqui Mountain HMA will have an estimated 64 mares treated and released with an estimated 65 Studs. This will bring down and maintain the population of horses to appropriate management levels established through the Pony Express Resource Management Plan 

Details of the Roundup: 

Members of the public are welcome to view the gather operations daily once they begin, so long as the safety of the animals, staff and observers are not jeopardized and operations are not disrupted. During the gather, interested public may participate in an escorted tour by meeting at the Flying J Truck Stop in Lake Point, Utah ready to leave at 5:30 a.m. sharp. The dates and departure times are subject to change depending upon weather and gather operations. The public is strongly encouraged to check the gather hotline nightly (801) 977-4341 for changes in schedule. Participants must provide their own transportation, water and lunches. The BLM recommends that the public dress for harsh field conditions. Binoculars as well as four wheel drive vehicles are strongly recommended.

Adoption:

Animals removed from the Cedar Mountain and Onaqui areas will be available for adoption through the BLM Wild Horse and Burro Adoption Program. To learn more about the program or to obtain an adoption application, visit the BLM National Wild Horse and Burro website.

Latest News:

For BLM news releases and statements issued about the Cedar Mountain and Onaqui gathers, check our Newsroom.

Background:
Cedar Mountain HMA
The Cedar Mountain HMA is currently home to an estimated 362 horses or a range of 290 to 434 horses. This number was derived from aerial inventory of the population, estimated increase, and the known removal of horses from the HMA. This number may fluctuate somewhat due to horse movement between the Cedar Mountain HMA, the Onaqui Mt. HMA and Dugway Proving Grounds. Fences that might preclude horse movement between the three areas are generally insufficient to deter movement. The current established appropriate management level for the Cedar Mt. HMA is set at 190 horses on the low end and 390 at the upper level. The HMA is approximately 197,252 acres in size.
 
Onaqui Mountain HMA
The Onaqui Mountain HMA is currently home to an estimated 159 horses or a range of 127 to 191 horses. This number was derived from aerial inventory of the population, estimated increase, and the known removal of horses from the HMA. This number may fluctuate somewhat due to horse movement between the Cedar Mtn HMA, the Onaqui Mt. HMA and Dugway Proving Grounds. Fences that might preclude horse movement between the three areas are generally insufficient to deter movement. The current established appropriate management level for the Onaqui Mt. HMA is set at 121 horses on the low end and 210 horses at the upper level. The HMA is approximately 206,795 acres in size.
 
Dependable summer water sources are a major problem. In drought years, natural water sources may dry up, generating the need for water to be trucked in. Hauling water is a financial impact to the BLM and the transportation infrastructure. In times of reducing budgets, there is no certainty that BLM will be able to continue to haul water to wild horses in sufficient quantity to insure the quality of their existence and avoid mortality. During drought, increased stress is also placed on the water sources and adjacent vegetation as horses congregate around troughs whether or not water is in the spring.

For more information on the Wild Horse and Burro Program, call 866-468-7826 or email wildhorse@blm.gov.

Grey stud on Onaqui HMA

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Today's Totals

Animals
Gathered

Animals
Returned to
Home Range

Animal
Deaths


 

0

0

0


Cedar Mtn Gather
Cumulative Totals

Animals
Gathered

Gather Related Animal Deaths

Non-Gather Related Animal
Deaths


 

348

 0

1


Onaqui Gather
Cumulative Totals

Animals
Gathered

Gather Related Animal Deaths

Non-Gather Related Animal
Deaths


 

155

 0

1