Utah Standards For Rangeland Health

Standards for Rangeland Health

Indian ricegrassStandard 1. Upland soils exhibit permeability and infiltration rates that sustain or improve site productivity, considering the soil type, climate, and landform. 
  As indicated by:  
a) Sufficient cover and litter to protect the soil surface from excessive water and wind erosion, promote infiltration, detain surface flow, and retard soil moisture loss by evaporation.  
b) The absence of indicators of excessive erosion such as rills, soil pedestals, and actively eroding gullies. 
c) The appropriate amount, type, and distribution of vegetation reflecting the presence of (1) the Desired Plant Community (DPC), where identified in a land use plan, or (2) where the DPC is not identified, a community that equally sustains the desired level of productivity and properly functioning ecological conditions.  

 
Standard 2. Riparian and wetland areas are in properly functioning condition. Stream channel morphology and functions are appropriate to soil type, climate and landform.         
 As indicated by:  
  a) Streambank vegetation consisting of, or showing a trend toward, species with root masses capable of withstanding high streamflow events. Vegetative cover adequate to protect stream banks and dissipate streamflow energy associated with high‑ water flows, protect against accelerated erosion, capture sediment, and provide for groundwater recharge.  
  b) Vegetation reflecting: Desired Plant Community, maintenance of riparian and wetland soil moisture characteristics, diverse age structure and composition, high vigor, large woody debris when site potential allows, and providing food, cover and other habitat needs for dependent animal species.  
  c) Revegetating point bars; lateral stream movement associated with natural sinuosity; channel width, depth, pool frequency and roughness appropriate to landscape position.    d) Active floodplain.              
 
Standard 3. Desired species, including native, threatened, endangered, and special status-species, are maintained at a level appropriate for the site and species involved.  
 As indicated by: 
  a) Frequency, diversity, density, age classes, and productivity of desired native species necessary to ensure reproductive capability and survival.  
  b) Habitats connected at a level to enhance species survival.  
  c) Native species reoccupy habitat niches and voids caused by disturbances unless management objectives call for introduction or maintenance of normative species.  
  d) Appropriate amount, type, and distribution of vegetation reflecting the presence of (1) the Desired Plant Community [DPC], where identified in a land use plan conforming to these Standards, or (2) where the DPC is identified a community that equally sustains the desired level of productivity and properly functioning ecological processes.        

Standard 4. BLM will apply and comply with water quality standards  established by the State of Utah (R.317‑2) and the Federal Clean Water and Safe Drinking   Water Acts.  Activities on BLM Lands will fully support the designated beneficial uses described in the Utah Water Quality standards (R.317‑2) for surface and   groundwater.1 
 As indicated by: 
  a) Measurement of nutrient loads, total dissolved solids, chemical constituents, fecal coliform,  water temperature and other water quality parameters.
  b) Macro‑invertebrate communities that indicate water quality meets aquatic objectives.  
 
   1 BLM will continue to coordinate monitoring water quality activities with other Federal, State and  technical agencies.