Wild and Scenic Rivers

Currently, there are no designated Wild and Scenic Rivers within the Diamond Mountain resource area.

Upper Green River

The upper Green River flows between Flaming Gorge Dam and the Utah-Colorado state line, a distance of approximately 30 miles. In 1980, an interagency team analyzed the upper Green River and recommended it suitable for designation as a scenic river under the criteria establishes by the Wild and Scenic River Act (National Park Service, 1980). No further action has been taken by the Secretary of Interior on this recommendation.

The middle and lower Green River segments flow between the southern boundary of the Dinosaur National Monument near Jensen, Utah, down to the southern boundary of the resource area at the Uintah-Carbon county line, a distance of approximately 102 miles. These segments have been determined eligible for designation into the NWSRS. A preliminary analysis suggests the middle Green River segment between Dinosaur National Monument and the public land boundary north of Ouray, Utah, meets the criteria for a recreation river, and the lower Green River segment between the public land boundary south of Ouray and the Carbon county line, a scenic river.

All three of these river segments are currently being managed to protect the identified outstandingly and/or remarkable values for waters eligible for further study as a wild and scenic river. In addition, two segments of Nine Mile Creek and one segment of Argyle Creek has been determined eligible for designation.

Argyle Creek and the upper segment of Nine Mile Creek have been assigned preliminary classification as Recreational rivers, while the lower Nine Mile segment received a Scenic preliminary classification.

The above river segments are being managed to protect the outstandingly remarkable values that make them eligible for designation.

Vernal is home to two river segments that are being considered for designation as Wild and Scenic Rivers (WSRs). They are:

For more information on WSRs please visit the state web page.

 


Wild & Scenic River Resource Information

  • The National Wild and Scenic Rivers System was created by the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968.
  • Section 5(d)(1) of the Act directs all federal agencies to consider the potential for national wild, scenic and recreational river areas in all planning for the use and development of water and related land resources.
  • BLM Manual 8351 identifies the general process followed by BLM for making eligibility, suitability, and tentative classifications for potentially eligible rivers identified during planning.
  • The document "Wild and Scenic River Review in the State of Utah, Process and Criteria for Interagency Use" provides additional guidance followed by the federal land management agencies (National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, and BLM) in Utah.
There are no rivers in Utah that have been designated by Congress into the National Wild & Scenic Rivers System. Because of Section 5(d)(1) of the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968, the BLM does conduct wild and scenic river reviews during land use planning. Wild and Scenic considerations are currently being made in six (Vernal Field Office is one) ongoing Utah BLM office planning efforts.

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