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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
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Wild Horses and Burros
Price Field Office Herd Management Areas
 
In 1971, Congress passed legislation to protect, manage and control wild horses and burros on the public lands. The Wild Free- Roaming Horse and Burro Act declared these animals to be “living symbols of the historic and pioneer sprit of the West.”
 
Congress further declared that “wild free-roaming horses and burros shall be protected from capture, branding, harassment, and death…” and that they are “…an integral part of the natural system of the public lands.” Furthermore, Bureau regulation requires that wild horses and burros be considered comparably with other resource values within the area.
 
The Bureau of Land Management maintains and manages wild horses or burros in “herd management areas” (HMAs)
 
In the 10 states where BLM manages wild horses and burros there are 270 herd areas. In Utah, about 3,600 horses are found among 23 different herds scattered across the state. Two herds of burros containing about 100 animals are found on public lands in southeastern Utah.  The Price Field Office manages 4 herds of wild horses containing approximately 225 horses and 1 burro herd containing approximately 70 burros.
 
Management Objectives
 
Management objectives for the herd areas are:
  1. Manage wild horses and burros at appropriate management levels (AML) to ensure a thriving natural ecological balance between wild horse populations, wildlife, livestock, vegetation resources, and other resource values
  2. Manage wild horses and burros to achieve and maintain viable, vigorous, and stable populations
  3. Manage for genetic diversity of wild horses and burros within the various herd management areas (HMA)
  4. Maintain, enhance, and perpetuate respective viable herds’ distinguishing characteristics (by HMA) that were typical at the time of the passage of the Wild Free-Roaming Horse and Burro Act or that are identified in a population management plan.
  5. Develop a recreation and viewing area for the public to observe wild horses in a natural setting.
WE NEED YOUR HELP
We invite you to view wild horses and burros, however, it is unlawful to chase and/or catch them. Foals, pregnant mares and older horses are easily hurt when pursued, so please allow them to live a free and unharassed life.
 
Help our wild horses by reporting illegal activity. Contact your local BLM office or call BLM law Enforcement at 1-800-722-3998

Wild Horses

 


Wild Horses