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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT

Table Rocks

Takelma Culture

How did the Takelma prepare acorns?

Acorn Preparation

Large quantities of acorns were collected in the late summer and early fall. After the acorns were collected, they were dried and could then be kept for years, if the supply lasted. more>>

How Were Baskets Used by the Takelma?

Takelma Basket Use

The Takelma collected many basket-making materials in the spring and summer, but focused on basket-making during the winter. Some materials used for Takelma basketry included hazel shoots, maidenhair-fern stems, willow shoots, beargrass, pine roots, porcupine quills, and iris leaves. Baskets were used for cooking, transportation of goods, and storage. more>>

How Did the Takelma Prepare Camas?

Camas Bulb Preparation

The camas bulbs were removed from the ground with a digging stick made from mountain mahogany, fitted with a cross piece handle of carved deer or elk antler. Camas bulbs were sometimes gathered in the spring to avoid confusion with death camas, but nutrient levels were much higher in the late summer/fall, so many bulbs were collected then as well. more>>

What tools did the Takelma use?

Takelma Tool Use

The tools used by the Takelma consisted of implements made of stone, bone, antler, and wood, as well as woven materials. The stone tools included projectile points (arrowheads) and other small flaked-stone tools made from obsidian, jasper, agate, and even petrified wood. Rock slabs were used to pound acorns and other materials. more>>

Hunting Large Game

Large Game Hunting

The Takelma used several techniques to hunt deer. They wore a deer head disguise to stalk and get close enough to the deer to spear them with an atlatal or use a bow. Dogs and fire were used to corral deer into an enclosure. The trapped deer were then killed with clubs. more>>

Ceremonies and spiritual beliefs of the Takelma

Ceremonies and Spiritual Beliefs

The Takelma expressed many spiritual beliefs through their myths and legends and the mythological characters found in these stories - several of which relate to the Table Rocks area. This belief system is described as animistic and is based on the belief that all natural objects are inhabited by a spirit. more>>