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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT

Table Rocks

Spring Seasonal Settlement Patterns of the Takelma

During the spring, the focus was on catching the spring run of salmon, an important food source for the Takelma (Gray 1987:32). Some of the methods used to obtain fish included hook and line, long nets used from canoes, dip-netting, and harpooning. Dams made of sticks were constructed across small channels with cone shaped baskets attached to the sticks. These baskets would catch the fish as they became trapped by the stick dam. Early white explorers remarked on how the Takelma captured spawning salmon from small streams by scooping them up by hand and tossing the fish onto the bank. Other foods harvested from the river included trout, steelhead, freshwater mussels, crayfish, and probably lamprey.

Gray, Dennis J.

  • 1987 The Takelma and their Athapascan Neighbors: A New Ethnographic Synthesis for the Upper Rogue River Area of Southwestern Oregon. Eugene, Oregon: University of Oregon Anthropological Papers No. 37.

Spring was also the time to collect camas bulbs and basketry materials. Both men and women gathered and carried foods and materials in large woven baskets called "burden baskets."

Burden Basket
Burden Basket
Collection of
Aleena Turpin
Coastal woman using Burden Basket
Coastal woman using
Burden Basket
Southern Oregon
Historical Society: #1160

Game animals included deer, elk, and rabbits. These animals were hunted with bows, atlatals, and snares and/or were driven into makeshift corrals. Waterfowl were also known to be eaten. Squirrels, chipmunks, and other small animals were sometimes hunted (Gray 1987:34). Acorns that had been gathered the previous fall were stored over the winter and processed into a valuable food resource in the spring.

Gray, Dennis J.

  • 1987 The Takelma and their Athapascan Neighbors: A New Ethnographic Synthesis for the Upper Rogue River Area of Southwestern Oregon. Eugene, Oregon: University of Oregon Anthropological Papers No. 37.
Atlatal, tool used to propel a spear

Atlatal
tool used to propel a spear

Elk

Elk

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