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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT

Table Rocks

Hiking the Table Rocks

The Table Rocks are visited by more then 10,000 visitors annually. Spring offers the best time for viewing the many different wild flowers and migratory birds.

From April to June, the Table Rocks are used as an outdoor classroom. Over 3,500 individuals participate in the Table Rocks Environmental Education Program. Students and community groups of 10 or more are led by BLM hike leaders who share their knowledge of the natural and cultural history as they ascend the Table Rock trails. Weekend guided hikes open to the public are provided by local volunteer specialists willing to share their knowledge while hiking the trails. Reservations for weekend hikes can be made starting in March through the Bureau of Land Management.

To ensure safe hiking and to preserve the natural integrity of the Table Rocks, please stay on designated trails and leave flowers for others to enjoy. Dogs are not allowed in order to prevent the disturbance of ground nesting birds and other animals. The use of horses, bicycles, and other vehicles is prohibited.

The mounded prairie/vernal pool plant community exists on the summits of both Table Rocks. During the wet season, pools of water begin to form in the low areas creating vernal pools. The Table Rock vernal pools are micro-ecosystems of habitat that support a federally threatened species of fairy shrimp and a state endangered plant called dwarf wooly meadowfoam (Limnanthes floccosa ssp. pumila). This plant is endemic to the Table Rocks, meaning it is found nowhere else in the world.

View of Lower Table Rock

View of Lower Table Rock

Lower Table Rock

From Interstate 5, take Exit #33 heading east one mile on East Pine Street and turn north at the signal onto Table Rock Road. Drive 10 miles to Wheeler Road and turn west. The trailhead is accessible off of Wheeler Road.

The trail is 1.75 miles long. It is a moderately difficult trail approximately .5 miles longer than Upper Table Rock Trail. Lower Table Rock Trail offers interpretive signs for hikers. Water is not available along the trail or at the trailhead. Allow approximately 4 hours for a round trip hike.

For those eager to extend their hike, you may enjoy walking along the abandoned airstrip to the edge of the rock. This will add an extra mile to your trip. The south edge of the rock offers a great view of the unique habitat of Kelly Slough. This wetland lies 800 feet below and provides unique habitat for many aquatic birds.

View of Upper Table Rock

View of Upper Table Rock

Upper Table Rock

From Interstate 5, take Exit #33 heading east one mile on East Pine Street and turn north at the signal onto Table Rock Road. Drive 5.3 miles to Modoc Road and turn north. The trailhead is accessible off Modoc Road.

The trail is approximately 1.25 miles long. It is an easy/moderate trail with some steep sections. Good sturdy shoes and water are strongly recommended. There is no water available on the trail or at the trailhead. Allow approximately three hours for your round trip hike. This trail is suggested for first time hikers.

On your ascent up the trail keep an eye out for the unique monolith rock formations. These irregular shaped monoliths may have been part of the original lava flow. On a clear day the summit offers a spectacular panoramic view that includes the Rogue River valley, Mt. McLoughlin, Mt. Ashland, and Pilot Rock.

Maps