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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT

Table Rocks

What tools did the Takelma use?

Hopper and mortar base
Hopper and mortar base
Collection of Department of Anthropology, Southern Oregon University
Spearpoint
Spearpoint
Collection of Department of Anthropology, Southern Oregon University
Arrowhead set
Set of tools used for making spearpoints
Collection of Department of Anthropology, Southern Oregon University
Arrowheads
Arrowheads
Collection of Department of Anthropology, Southern Oregon University

The tools used by the Takelma consisted of implements made of stone, bone, antler, and wood, as well as woven materials. The stone tools included projectile points (arrowheads) and other small flaked-stone tools made from obsidian, jasper, agate, and even petrified wood. Rock slabs were used to pound acorns and other materials. Numerous other tools including pestles and mortars, hammerstones, and stone pipes were made from stone. Tools made from bone and antler included harpoons (for fishing), needles, spoons, scratching sticks, and elkhorn wedges. Deer or elk sinew and pitch from trees were used for attaching tool pieces together, and sinew or iris fiber twine was used as thread. Implements made from wood included bows, arrows, needles, atlatals, spoons, digging sticks, and stirring paddles. Roots, grasses, and bark were woven to make baskets, cups, plates, cradles, trays, and hats (Satler 1979).

Satler, Timothy

  • 1979 Preliminary Report of Test Excavations at Salt Creek Site in Southwestern Oregon. Medford, OR: DOI Bureau of Land Management, Medford District Office.
Decorative hat
Decorative hats
Collection of Aleena Turpin
Storage basket
Storage basket
Collection of Aleena Turpin
Utility basket
Utility basket
Collection of Aleena Turpin
Burden basket
Burden basket
Collection of Aleena Turpin
Antler spoons
Antler spoons
Collection of Aleena Turpin
Axe and fishing weights
Axe and fishing weights
Collection of Department of Anthropology, Southern Oregon University
Mortar and pestle
Mortar and pestle
Grinding tool

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