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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT

Oregon / Washington

Limpy Creek

Archaeological site

Indian people lived at the Limpy Creek site in the Rogue River drainage from shortly before European/American contact into the 1840's. Charred acorns, salmon vertebrae, deer and bear bones and fresh water shells show the wide choices of foods used by these people. Carbon and soil found in a soapstone lamp were tested and found to contain bear grease.

Most of the tools in the site were made of locally available jasper, chert, and basalt; however, metal buckles, square nails, porcelain manufactured from 1820 on, and a half-dime dated 1838 demonstrate the beginning of contact with European/American traders.

An excavation in the 1990's in the Rogue drainage is providing a fuller description of the food and tool resources used in Oregon's southwestern mountains.

Images of the Limpy Creek dig site

(Click for a larger image)

Limpy Creek dig site Limpy Creek dig site