E-Mail-800-1199

# Sender Subject Date Body
EM-800 Melissa DeCook <melissadecook@msn.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/13/2007 8:47:51 Dear BLM,
I live in Oregon for a variety of reasons, including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. I am also concerned about the negative effects this logging will have on the environment. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won?t be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon?s spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

Melissa DeCook
3425 Concord St.
Eugene, OR 97402
EM-801 "Erik Stamatz" <erikstam@colheli.com> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision 11/13/2007 13:45:52 Erik Stamatz
PO Box 3500
Portland, OR 97208-3500


November 13, 2007

Edward Shepard
OR/WA State Director
Bureau of Land Management
PO Box 2965
Portland, OR 97208


Dear Edward Shepard:

Please accept the following comments on the BLM's Draft Environmental
Impact Statement for the Revision of the Resource Management Plans for
Western Oregon.

None of the three alternatives presented in the DEIS meet the requirements
of the O&C Act because they do not manage the land for the dominant use of
timber production. Reserving the majority (52%) of the suitable
timberlands for the purpose of a listed species is contrary to the O&C Act.

Because of the unique nature of the O&C Lands, by law these lands are not
available to be part of a reserve system designed to recover a listed
species. The BLM should consider active management for the protection of
listed and sensitive species and their habitat before adopting passive,
reserve strategies. The alternative selected by the BLM, however, should
be one that will not jeopardize the continued existence of listed species
within the species entire habitat range.

The BLM must develop and analyzes at least one alternative that maximizes
the amount of land in timber production and receipts to local county
governments, and meets its no jeopardy obligation.

Congress and the Administration must ensure that when the Plan is
finalized that the BLM receives adequate funding so that it can be fully
implemented.

When implemented, the Plan should live up to the full commitment that was
made to local counties.

When implemented, the Plan should live up to the full commitment that was
made to local counties.

Timber sale revenues must generate at least an amount equal to the funding
that was provided to local counties through the Secure Rural Schools and
Community Self-Determination Act on a yearly basis.

All BLM administered land should be managed to minimize the threat of
catastrophic wildfire on these lands and surrounding state and private
lands.

Access should be maintained through BLM administered lands for private
land access, fire suppression, as well as recreational uses, such as
hunting, fishing, boating and sightseeing.

In summary, the economic viability of our rural communities and the
overall health of our federal forests are of vital importance to me. I
ask that you give these comments full consideration as you prepare the
final Environmental Impact Statement and select the final management plans
for the Western Oregon BLM Districts.

Sincerely,


Erik Stamatz

EM-802 Forwarded by alan_hoffmeister@blm.gov Fw: Western Oregon Plan Revisions 11/13/2007 16:26:30 ----- Forwarded by Pam Robbins/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 11/13/2007 03:41 PM -----

Frances Dunham <francesdunham@mchsi.com>

11/10/2007 09:06 PM

To
or912web@blm.gov
cc

Subject
Western Oregon Plan Revisions








November 9, 2007

Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue, Portland, OR 97208
Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions
Dear BLM:
I am concerned that the Western Oregon Plan Revisions are revisions that, were it not for industry's desire to ravage more of Oregon's forest for its own interests, are unnecessary and detrimental to the public's interest in saving forests and protecting natural resources.
In my reading of the Draft EIS, all of the proposed "alternatives" have serious drawbacks. The managed emphasis on Alternative #2, would give timber companies largely unfettered access to old growth forest, preferring new cutting rather than salvage, permit thousands of miles of new road incursions, and increase fragmentation.  I am interested in the decommissioning of existing roads near streams, but have serious reservations about the number of new roads that will be created. 
Since there is no required number of board feet to be recovered under O&C legislation or in rulings like Headwaters; Seattle/Portland; and Audubon challenges, it seems that if the emphasis were placed on salvage instead of the constant demand for new cutting of old-growth, a sustainable yield of some 200 million bd ft in already harvested should be satisfactory.
I am also concerned about the impacts to water. I like the No Action Alternative because it fully retains the required shade and has the widest riparian reserves (2 SPT both sides). Given the pressures for maximizing yield, the fact that these reserves are somewhat in excess of what is needed is a meaningful cushion against encroachment. Further, thinning, as the EIS relates, would "have no effect on shade loss."
For these and other reasons, I am not in favor of the "preferred alternative #2, and support the more conservative No Action Alternative. 
Sincerely,
Frances W. Dunham, 807 Beach Street, Ashland OR 97520

CC:
Senator Ron Wyden; Senator Gordon Smith; Rep. Peter DeFazio (D-4th);Rep. Greg Walden (R-2nd) ; Rep. Earl Blumenhauer (D-3rd) ;Rep. Darlene Hooley (D-5th);
Rep. David Wu (D-1st)
EM-803 Forwarded by alan_hoffmeister@blm.gov Fw: Western Oregon Plan Revisions 11/13/2007 16:26:30 ----- Forwarded by Pam Robbins/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 11/13/2007 03:41 PM -----

Frances Dunham <francesdunham@mchsi.com>

11/10/2007 09:06 PM

To
or912web@blm.gov
cc

Subject
Western Oregon Plan Revisions








November 9, 2007

Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue, Portland, OR 97208
Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions
Dear BLM:
I am concerned that the Western Oregon Plan Revisions are revisions that, were it not for industry's desire to ravage more of Oregon's forest for its own interests, are unnecessary and detrimental to the public's interest in saving forests and protecting natural resources.
In my reading of the Draft EIS, all of the proposed "alternatives" have serious drawbacks. The managed emphasis on Alternative #2, would give timber companies largely unfettered access to old growth forest, preferring new cutting rather than salvage, permit thousands of miles of new road incursions, and increase fragmentation.  I am interested in the decommissioning of existing roads near streams, but have serious reservations about the number of new roads that will be created. 
Since there is no required number of board feet to be recovered under O&C legislation or in rulings like Headwaters; Seattle/Portland; and Audubon challenges, it seems that if the emphasis were placed on salvage instead of the constant demand for new cutting of old-growth, a sustainable yield of some 200 million bd ft in already harvested should be satisfactory.
I am also concerned about the impacts to water. I like the No Action Alternative because it fully retains the required shade and has the widest riparian reserves (2 SPT both sides). Given the pressures for maximizing yield, the fact that these reserves are somewhat in excess of what is needed is a meaningful cushion against encroachment. Further, thinning, as the EIS relates, would "have no effect on shade loss."
For these and other reasons, I am not in favor of the "preferred alternative #2, and support the more conservative No Action Alternative. 
Sincerely,
Frances W. Dunham, 807 Beach Street, Ashland OR 97520

CC:
Senator Ron Wyden; Senator Gordon Smith; Rep. Peter DeFazio (D-4th);Rep. Greg Walden (R-2nd) ; Rep. Earl Blumenhauer (D-3rd) ;Rep. Darlene Hooley (D-5th);
Rep. David Wu (D-1st)
EM-804 Forwarded by alan_hoffmeister@blm.gov Fw: old growth logging 11/13/2007 16:27:47 ----- Forwarded by Pam Robbins/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 11/13/2007 03:43 PM -----

"Bill Macdonald" <wmgrant1942@gmail.com>

11/12/2007 05:46 PM

To
or912web@blm.gov
cc

Subject
old growth logging








Big timber interests, despite all the complaining about a suffering
economy, have unequivocally demonstrated immense shortsightedness
protecting the very environment they depend on.  I'm simply asking
that the BLM do its job to protect remaining ecosystems from any form
of destructive harvesting, notably, clear cutting.  You'd think the
abundant scientific data would be sufficient, but i guess there is no
antidote for the blindness of greed.  BLM needs to do the right thing
instead of constantly caving in to advocates of unsustainable
forestry.  It is already far past the point of "enough is enough."

William Grant Macdonald
Eugene
EM-805 David Olson <dbtrees@frontiernet.net> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/13/2007 16:52:45 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

David Olson
7784 N 850 Ave.
Cambridge, IL 61238
EM-806 Colby Buswell <colbybuzz@netscape.net> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/14/2007 10:58:57 Dear BLM,
I live in Oregon for a variety of reasons, including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won?t be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon?s spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

Colby Buswell
3908 SE Willamette Dr
Portland, OR 97267
EM-807 Forwarded by alan_hoffmeister@blm.gov Fw: Stop the Western Oregon Plan Revision 11/14/2007 15:42:42 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 11/14/2007 03:42 PM -----

"Topanien Gifts" <gifts@topanien.com>

11/07/2007 01:15 PM

To
<Alan_Hoffmeister@BLM.gov>
cc

Subject
Stop the Westen Oregon Plan Revision








Dear Mr. Hoffmeister,
I am writing to encourage you to stop the Western Oregon Plan Revision and its' proposal to add Off Road Vehicle (ORV) emphasis areas in ecologically sensitive areas.  As a home owner with property adjacent to and among some of the proposed sites I am very concerned about the negative ecological and economic impact that this proposal will have on my family's and my life and economic well-being.  We have gone to the trouble and expense to re-forest ¾ of our 20 acres, have installed solar panels for electricity and hot water, have built a masonry stove that uses less wood than a normal fireplace or woodstove and burns much cleaner, have purchased a bio-diesel car and produce our own fuel. As you can see, the environment, and our impact upon it, is very important to me, my husband and our two children as well as our neighbors.  We do not want to lose our trees and the views that they afford.  We do not want Four Wheel Drive Vehicles tearing around property near and dear to us.  I am an avid runner and use the Armstrong Creek Gulch Forest Service Road as one of my main running routes.   I cross paths with hunters, berry pickers, many deer, some wild turkey and a few bears.  All of us would disappear if you allow ORV owners to invade Southern Oregon land with their very noisy and destructive machines.  Please stop the Western Oregon Plan Revision and proposal to add ORV's.  Thank you.
 
                                                                                                                                                -Nadine Lefkowitz
                                                                                                                                                 8900 Sterling Creek Rd.
                                                                                                                                                 Jacksonville, OR   97530
                                                                                                                                                 e-mail:  topanien@jeffnet.org    
 
cc:  Senators Gordon Smith and Ron Wyden
EM-808 Christopher Johnson <jcjohnson414@comcast.net> WOPR is bad for Oregon. Period. 11/14/2007 22:20:19 Dear Bureau of Land Management representative,
As a concerned citizen of Oregon, I oppose the draft Western Oregon Plan
Revision in its present form on the grounds that it is too extreme, and
poses serious threats to the wildlife, watersheds, and quality of life
in Oregon.

The unsustainable increase in logging allowed in the plan would create a
more severe fire risk, decimate the precious few remaining old growth
stands, potentially contribute more to global warming, and negatively
impact fishing, hunting and recreational activities in the state.

Unfortunately, none of the alternative plans provided address these
crucial issues in a meaningful way. Rather, each seems to be balanced in
favor of boosting timber revenues. Please reshape the Oregon Plan to
better reflect the values that Oregonians like myself hold dear. Thank
you for considering my comments.

Respectfully,
Christopher Johnson

1716 SE Elliott Ave.
Portland, OR 97214
EM-809 "Eric Stuewe" <eric@stuewe.com> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision 11/15/2007 7:37:16 Eric Stuewe
2290 SE Kiger Island Drive
Corvallis, OR 97333-9425


November 15, 2007

Edward Shepard
OR/WA State Director
Bureau of Land Management
PO Box 2965
Portland, OR 97208


Dear Edward Shepard:

Please accept the following comments on the BLM's Draft Environmental
Impact Statement for the Revision of the Resource Management Plans for
Western Oregon.

We are a company here in Oregon which makes it's living selling
specialized nursery containers for growing forest tree seedlings in
commerical nurseries. My interest in this issue might appear self serving
however I have also noticed how well BLM manages their forest (I sell
nursery containers to two Oregon BLM nurseries) and I'm impressed. The
nursery managers work with the foresters in the field to develop the best
seedlings for specific purposes to achieve free to grow status for cut
over lands.

Thank you for your serious consideration of Alternative #2 for the
Resource Management Plans for Western Oregon.

In summary, the economic viability of our rural communities and the
overall health of our federal forests are of vital importance to me. I
ask that you give these comments full consideration as you prepare the
final Environmental Impact Statement and select the final management plans
for the Western Oregon BLM Districts.

Sincerely,


Eric Stuewe

EM-810 Forwarded by alan_hoffmeister@blm.gov Fw: WOPR 11/15/2007 7:40:39 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 11/15/2007 07:40 AM -----




Kris Graves <kc1graves@yahoo.com>

11/14/2007 04:43 PM

To
woinfo@blm.gov
cc

Subject
WOPR








Dear BLM,
    PLEASE Stop your awful plans to increase logging on public lands in Oregon by clear cutting old-growth forests!!  My husband and I vacation in the Cascades and on the coast several times a month.  Each time we leave Corvallis we are shocked and saddened by the numbers of logging trucks, clear cuts, stream runoff, denuded hillsides and empty mountains.  THese views of this trashed environment make the drive to the coast a horror scene instead of a pleasure. There is so little of Oregon wildlife left!   Why would you even think about the negative impacts your plans would have on the few wild salmon left.  Please stop this plan!
Sincerely,
Kristin and John Graves
3294 SE Hathaway
Corvallis, Or
97333

 

Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.

EM-811 Forwarded by alan_hoffmeister@blm.gov Fw: Protect BLM forests and rivers 11/15/2007 7:41:52 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 11/15/2007 07:41 AM -----

LApsel@aol.com

11/14/2007 10:46 PM

To
Alan_Hoffmeister@blm.gov
cc

Subject
Protect BLM forests and rivers








Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue Portland, Oregon
Portland, OR 97208

CC: Oregon Congressional delegation

Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions


Dear BLM,

I am very concerned with the direction the Bush Administration is headed in with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of Oregon's federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and may lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.



The Bush Administration's preferred alternative proposes to clear-cut 140,000 acres of Oregon's old-growth every decade, build 1,000 mile of new logging roads, and create over 100,000 miles of new Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas-all at the expense of roadless areas, threatened species, water quality and non-motorized recreation.



Most Americans want federal land managers to embrace thinning second growth forests, safeguard communities from wildfire and protect what remains of our nation's ancient forests. Indeed, many Oregon forest managers are already moving beyond the conflicts of the past. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - they are providing wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Lynn Reichman


**************************************
See what's new at http://www.aol.com
EM-812 Forwarded by alan_hoffmeister@blm.gov Fw: Protect BLM forests and rivers 11/15/2007 7:42:47 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 11/15/2007 07:42 AM -----

Dale Laitinen <laitinen@goldrush.com>

11/14/2007 10:05 PM

To
Alan_Hoffmeister@blm.gov
cc

Subject
Protect BLM forests and rivers








Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue Portland, Oregon
Portland, OR 97208

CC: Oregon Congressional delegation

Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions

Dear BLM,

I am very concerned with the direction the Bush Administration is  
headed in with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of Oregon's  
federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am  
concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating will unravel the  
protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and may lead to  
water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and  
controversy.

The Bush Administration's preferred alternative proposes to clear-cut  
140,000 acres of Oregon's old-growth every decade, build 1,000 mile  
of new logging roads, and create over 100,000 miles of new Off  
Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas-all at the expense of roadless areas,  
threatened species, water quality and non-motorized recreation.

Most Americans want federal land managers to embrace thinning second  
growth forests, safeguard communities from wildfire and protect what  
remains of our nation's ancient forests. Indeed, many Oregon forest  
managers are already moving beyond the conflicts of the past. By  
focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are  
now overgrown and in need of thinning - they are providing wood to  
local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife  
and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

In contrast, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by  
increasing old-growth clear-cutting for a short-term economic fix.  
The WOPR puts water quality at-risk and would destroy some of  
Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature  
and old-growth forests on public land, not clear-cut these natural  
treasures as the WOPR proposes to do.

It is disappointing that at a time when public consensus for old-
growth protection and second-growth thinning has never been stronger,  
the BLM is proposing to clear-cut forests older than our nation and  
turn complex ecosystems into flammable tree farms.

Please protect remaining old-growth forests, focus active management  
of BLM lands in already logged-over areas, and concentrate job  
opportunities in restoration thinning projects that benefit  
watersheds and generate wood products without multiplying past mistakes.

Sincerely,
Dale Laitinen

YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS
Dale Laitinen
POB 306
Mt Ranch, CA 95246
EM-813 Forwarded by alan_hoffmeister@blm.gov Fw: Protect BLM forests and rivers 11/15/2007 8:11:18 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 11/15/2007 08:10 AM -----

Ryan Talbott <rtalbott@alleghenydefense.org>

10/10/2007 10:12 AM

To
Alan_Hoffmeister@blm.gov
cc

Subject
Protect BLM forests and rivers








Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue Portland, Oregon
Portland, OR 97208

CC: Oregon Congressional delegation

Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions

Dear BLM, 

I am very concerned with the direction the Bush Administration is headed in with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of Oregon's federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and may lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

The Bush Administration's preferred alternative proposes to clear-cut 140,000 acres of Oregon's old-growth every decade, build 1,000 mile of new logging roads, and create over 100,000 miles of new Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas-all at the expense of roadless areas, threatened species, water quality and non-motorized recreation.

Most Americans want federal land managers to embrace thinning second growth forests, safeguard communities from wildfire and protect what remains of our nation's ancient forests. Indeed, many Oregon forest managers are already moving beyond the conflicts of the past. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - they are providing wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

In contrast, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clear-cutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at-risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clear-cut these natural treasures as the WOPR proposes to do. 

It is disappointing that at a time when public consensus for old-growth protection and second-growth thinning has never been stronger, the BLM is proposing to clear-cut forests older than our nation and turn complex ecosystems into flammable tree farms. 

Please protect remaining old-growth forests, focus active management of BLM lands in already logged-over areas, and concentrate job opportunities in restoration thinning projects that benefit watersheds and generate wood products without multiplying past mistakes.

Sincerely,



Ryan Talbott
6626 SE 67th Avenue
Portland, OR  97206


EM-814 Forwarded by alan_hoffmeister@blm.gov Fw: WOPR Comment 11/15/2007 8:12:45 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 11/15/2007 08:12 AM -----

"Larry Fox" <larfox@comcast.net>

11/14/2007 06:36 PM

To
<Alan_Hoffmeister@blm.gov>
cc
<lesley@kswild.org>, "Patty Dalegowski" <patty.dalegowski@gmail.com>
Subject
WOPR Comment








BLM,
 
Having reviewed the proposed alternative to be adopted as the new forest plan for Western Oregon (WOPR), I want to express my total opposition to it.  WOPR emphasizes cutting of trees older than 200 years old; i.e., precious remaining old growth, and drastically reduces riparian buffers for environmental protection.  In addition, it is focused on clear cutting versus selective harvesting.  I oppose all three aspects of this plan and, as a taxpayer and citizen of this beautiful State of Oregon, implore you to stick with the current Northwest Forest Plan guidelines and continue to protect these incredible natural resources for generations to come.
 
Larry Fox
9 N. Monroe St.
Eugene, OR 97402
 
EM-815 "Patty Dalegowski" <patty.dalegowski@gmail.com> WOPR 11/15/2007 13:41:13 I am an over 30 year resident of the Illinois Valley in southern
Oregon writing in opposition to WOPR. In the years my husband, son
and I have lived here I have come to love Oregon, its tree-covered
mountains, clean air and clear rivers. I like to hike in the forests
and raft the magnificent Rogue River. In traveling around the country
I have learned that what we may take for granted here is unique and
that few areas rival Oregon's riches. The Bush administration's plan
to log so much of the precious little remaining old growth timber and
cut back protective riparian zones is outrageous. To me it seems
criminal. These are "public" lands yet one man is proposing actions
that will seriously degrade the entire western half of Oregon.

I believe much of the future of our area lies in tourism. We have
the aforementioned beautiful rivers and tree covered mountains that
people pay to visit. The Rogue River is a fisherman's dream. People
come here to camp, hike, raft, swim, hunt and fish. How many people
would be drawn to vacation in a land of clearcuts and muddy streams.
The proposed logging would cause erosion and silting of rivers and
streams. It would negatively affect the drinking water of western
Oregon cities that originates on BLM lands.

The widespread clearcutting of public forests by BLM would degrade our
land and reduce property values. The idea of setting aside wilderness
areas for off highway vehicle use is particularly obnoxious and again
would reduce property values. Obviously, habitat for many plant and
animal species, including endangered ones, would be degraded.

These BLM lands contain some of the last remaining old growth forests
which should be considered strictly off limits to logging. These
areas are not replaceable. They are truly special and should be kept
intact for all to enjoy - our generation and those to come.

Another important issue is global warming. These old forests are what
the world needs more of. WOPR would increase carbon emissions. Old
growth forests are also resistant to fire while managed tree
plantations are just the opposite.

My vision is to protect Oregon's old growth forests and work on
restoring areas that have been damaged, also to employ people to
manage forests around our communities to better protect them from
fire. As a taxpayer and citizen I implore you to continue the
Northwest Forest Plan guidelines and protect our precious natural
resources.
EM-816 Erin Mills <erin.mills@wellpoint.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/15/2007 19:24:26 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Erin Mills
22164 Hackney St.
West Hills, CA 91304
EM-817 Paul Kremser <pckremser@gmail.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/16/2007 10:08:50 Dear BLM,
I live in Oregon for a variety of reasons, including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won?t be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon?s spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

I spend alot of time in the Roseburg district where I live. It is clear that by cuttiing old growth all you do is replace forest with tree farms that become impossible to hike and hunt in once the reprod grows. I am espessially dis hartened by reducing streamside protection etc. Most mills in our area have converted to smaller diameter trees. Utilize the tree farms that you created 40 years ago rather than eliminating any more forests!!

Paul Kremser
489 Cherokee Ave
Roseburg, OR 97470
EM-818 "Mark Slezak" <mslezak@cfpwood.com> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision 11/16/2007 15:27:43 Mark Slezak
P.O. Box 1780
Klamath Falls, OR 97601-0241


November 16, 2007

Edward Shepard
OR/WA State Director
Bureau of Land Management
PO Box 2965
Portland, OR 97208


Dear Edward Shepard:

Please accept the following comments on the BLM's Draft Environmental
Impact Statement for the Revision of the Resource Management Plans for
Western Oregon.

None of the three alternatives presented in the DEIS meet the requirements
of the O&C Act because they do not manage the land for the dominant use of
timber production. Reserving the majority (52%) of the suitable
timberlands for the purpose of a listed species is contrary to the O&C Act.

Because of the unique nature of the O&C Lands, by law these lands are not
available to be part of a reserve system designed to recover a listed
species. The BLM should consider active management for the protection of
listed and sensitive species and their habitat before adopting passive,
reserve strategies. The alternative selected by the BLM, however, should
be one that will not jeopardize the continued existence of listed species
within the species entire habitat range.

The BLM must develop and analyzes at least one alternative that maximizes
the amount of land in timber production and receipts to local county
governments, and meets its no jeopardy obligation.



When implemented, the Plan should live up to the full commitment that was
made to local counties.

When implemented, the Plan should live up to the full commitment that was
made to local counties.

Timber sale revenues must generate at least an amount equal to the funding
that was provided to local counties through the Secure Rural Schools and
Community Self-Determination Act on a yearly basis.

All BLM administered land should be managed to minimize the threat of
catastrophic wildfire on these lands and surrounding state and private
lands.

Access should be maintained through BLM administered lands for private
land access, fire suppression, as well as recreational uses, such as
hunting, fishing, boating and sightseeing.

Thank you for considering these comments on behalf of nearly 400 Columbia
Forest Products employees in Oregon and 3,000 employees nationwide.



In summary, the economic viability of our rural communities and the
overall health of our federal forests are of vital importance to me. I
ask that you give these comments full consideration as you prepare the
final Environmental Impact Statement and select the final management plans
for the Western Oregon BLM Districts.

Sincerely,


Mark Slezak, Raw Materials Mgr.
541-273-2504

EM-819 Laura Steenhoek <lgsteenhoek@worldnet.att.net> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/16/2007 22:24:46 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Laura Steenhoek
7070 SW 141st Place
Beaverton, OR 97008
EM-820 Sue Lily <lily@frontiernet.net> WOPR Comment 11/17/2007 12:24:53 Hello.

I attended the open house in Cave Junction, and received a CD copy of the BLM WOPR plan revision.

There is no evidence that your study included climate change in its analysis: carbon sequestration provided by our forests must be addressed to have any relevance to the future.

Carbon sequestration could be the future source of O&C replacement money:  our forests reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide,  but only if the trees are alive.

Naturally, congress will have to impose carbon taxes nationally.  Forested areas would receive compensation for NOT CUTTING their trees.

Only the "no-action alternative" will be of benefit when this necessary course is taken: the larger older trees sequester the most carbon.

Any logging creates more fire hazardso the "no-action alternative" is again the best course to take. (The famous Tillamook burn began in logging slash and slash fuels the annual fires far more than standing green trees.)


Since 1859,  Oregon forests have been decimated by industry.  What existed under aboriginal management for over 10,000 years has been virtually eliminated in 150 years. Like the buffalo.  I'm not proud of being Caucasian or American anymore. Humiliated, actually.

You are failing stewardship responsibility.
The future is not about making industry rich.  
The future is about maintaining fresh water. 

WITHHOLD ALL ACTION UNTIL THIS ADMINISTRATION IS OUT OF POWER - THEY HAVE ACCOMPLISHED ONLY DAMMAGE TO THE AMERICAN PEOPLE, AND THE NATURAL LANDSCAPE.

Susan Lily
220 Farris Lane
Cave Junction OR 97523

EM-821 "Arnie & Katie" <mountnhigh@bmi.net> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 11/17/2007 12:25:00 You haven't managed the forest verry well in the past n now you want to ruin what's left,haven't you heard of global warming?Go fix what you've messed up in the past,you have lost your right to manage the peoples forest  Arnie Mount
I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks.

Sincerely,

YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS
EM-822 Joseph Haxel <haxsoul@charter.net> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/17/2007 17:02:20 Dear BLM,
I live in Oregon for a variety of reasons, including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won?t be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon?s spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

Joseph Haxel
108 SE Fogarty Street
Newport, OR 97365
EM-823 KEVIN KEENE <keenefam@msn.com> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 11/17/2007 17:34:50 As a father of 2, I am sickened that the BLM would even consider clear cutting ancient forests.  While it may be true that "trees" can be replanted.  Old-growth trees CAN NOT.  Not to mention old-growth forests.  It is simply impossible to recreate the eco-diversity that nature has created over hundreds or thousands of years. 
 
As a citizen, I urge you to protect my kids and grandchildrens legacy and protect Ancient Forests and Trees.
 
Kevin Keene
20890 NW Trailwalk Dr
Beaverton, OR 97006
(503) 310-8467
 


Connect and share in new ways with Windows Live. Connect now!
EM-824 Charlotte Sahnow <csahnow@uoregon.edu> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/17/2007 17:38:03 Dear BLM,
I live in Oregon for a variety of reasons, including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won?t be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon?s spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

Charlotte R. Sahnow
2756 Chad Drive
Eugeme, OR 97408

541/686-5009
EM-825 patricia markus <gaits2go@teleport.com> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 11/17/2007 21:19:08 I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by
the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving
forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase
logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in
currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon
bearing rivers and creeks.

Sincerely,
Patricia Markus
82223 Hanna Rd
Dexter, OR 97431
EM-826 Janice Reid <jars@aceweb.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/17/2007 22:59:49 Dear BLM,
The Western Oregon lan Revision is a huge step backward in the direction that we need to be going in order to protect the remaining old growth ecosystem. The spotted owl population is suffering from pressure from logging on private lands and an increase in the number of barred owls. It does not help the prospects for spotted owl recovery for the federal government to be liquidating the old forests on the land where spotted owls are most successful. BLM has much of the prime spotted owl habitat and is an integral part of the distribution of the spotted owl population.
The WOPR is a bad idea and is in violation of newer laws that have been instituted to correct the past activities that have damaged our fisheries and wildlife. The people want their water to be clean and their wildlife preserved. That is why the clean water act and endangered species act were passed into law. The writers of the O&C act probably did not anticipate how efficient the logging industry would be at liquidating the forests.
It must be an bad plan for the environment if the timber industry is seending out prestamped postcards pre-addressed with pre-filled out comments in support of the WOPR to thousands of people in the northwest.
Drop the WOPR, it is bad.


Janice Reid
3632 N Bank Rd
Roseburg, OR 97470
EM-827 Randy Tashjian <envirohero@hotmail.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/17/2007 23:48:59 Dear BLM,
I live in Oregon for a variety of reasons, including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won?t be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon?s spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

Randy Tashjian
1031 Trafalgar Drive
Glendale, CA 91207
EM-828 dale hubbard <hydrophile70@yahoo.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/18/2007 14:38:44 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

dale hubbard
927 sw 10th st
corvallis, OR 97333
EM-829 Forwarded by alan_hoffmeister@blm.gov Fw: Case Law and EO 11644 11/19/2007 7:52:24 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 11/19/2007 07:48 AM -----
----- Forwarded by John Gerritsma/MDFO/OR/BLM/DOI on 11/16/2007 12:03 PM -----

"Randy Rasmussen" <rrasmussen@americanhiking.org>

11/16/2007 11:03 AM

Please respond to
<rrasmussen@americanhiking.org>



To
<John_Gerritsma@or.blm.gov>
cc
<RCKingsnorth@aol.com>
Subject
Case Law and EO 11644








John:
 
As promised during our meeting with Tim Reuwsaat and the Johns Peak/Timber Mountain Citizens Alliance, here is a brief summary of case law regarding Executive Order (EO) 11644 on off-road vehicles (ORVs) and BLM's corresponding regulations (43 CFR §8342.1) regarding BLM designation of ORV areas and routes.  This summary is offered in support for the Citizens Alliance's request that the BLM not designate the Johns Peak/Timber Mountain area as an OHV Emphasis Area in the WOPR/BLM Medford District RMP revision because of significant and ongoing conflicts posed by ORV use within the area.
 
It does not appear that the Supreme Court has addressed route designation criteria contained within EO 11644 or any other aspect of this EO, so far as I can tell.  So I am limiting my summary to decisions rendered by federal courts within the 9th Circuit (CA, OR, WA, AZ, NV, MT, ID, etc.) and by the Interior Board of Land Appeals (IBLA) for relevant appeals filed on BLM actions throughout the Western States.  Keep in mind that I am not an attorney, however, nor did I seek the assistance of an attorney in compiling this summary.  So take this summary for what it's worth and feel free to confirm this with a DOI attorney/solicitor.
 
One has to go back many years to find case law regarding EO 11644 and its ORV designation criteria, as virtually no recent rulings exist. But within the following cases, the courts and the IBLA have consistently upheld the intent of President Nixon's EO 11644 and its directives that ORV routes be selected so as to minimize adverse environmental effects.
 
1. U.S. District Court, Central District, California, in American Motorcycle Association v. Watt II, 1982 (543 F.Supp. 789) where the Court upheld EO 11644. In his opinion, District Judge Tashima spoke about the general applicability of all the ORV route designation criteria contained within EO 11644 and wrote:
 
"In essence, both 43 C.F.R. § 8342.1 and E.O. 11,644 require that routes for off-road vehicles ("ORVs") be selected so as to minimize adverse environmental effects. As will be elaborated below, I conclude that the criteria in the Plan are inconsistent with 43 C.F.R. § 8342.1, in that they allow for route approval without minimization of adverse environmental impacts.".and."Instead of ensuring "minimization" of environmental impacts as is required by § 8342.1, the BLM appears to have demanded only avoidance of "considerable adverse effects.""
 
2. IBLA in California Wilderness Coalition et al 1988 (101 IBLA 18), where it specifically upheld criteria in Section 3 of EO 11644 related to soils, watersheds and archaeological resources in 43 CFR 8342.1 (b) and (c).
 
3. IBLA in Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance 1988 (142 IBLA 164) where it upheld criteria contained within Section 3 of EO 11644 as it relates to Moquith Mountains WSA. Unfortunately, my notes from a year or two ago do not provide further details about which aspects or specific criteria of 43 CFR §8342.1 the IBLA addressed, but I assume it included the criterion addressing wilderness or primitive areas (43 CFR §8342.1 (d)).
 
I hope this summary is useful for your efforts in the Medford RMP revision.  Please do not hesitate to contact me if I can provide additional information.
 
Randy Rasmussen
Recreation Policy Specialist
American Hiking Society
946 NW Circle Blvd. #145
Corvallis, OR 97330
Email: rrasmussen@americanhiking.org
 
 
 
EM-830 "Terry Silbernagel" <tsilbernagel@agribis.com> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision 11/19/2007 10:24:08 Terry Silbernagel
120 Churchdale Ave N
Keizer, OR 97303-4504


November 19, 2007

Edward Shepard
OR/WA State Director
Bureau of Land Management
PO Box 2965
Portland, OR 97208


Dear Edward Shepard:

Please accept the following comments on the BLM's Draft Environmental
Impact Statement for the Revision of the Resource Management Plans for
Western Oregon.

Because of the unique nature of the O&C Lands, by law these lands are not
available to be part of a reserve system designed to recover a listed
species. The BLM should consider active management for the protection of
listed and sensitive species and their habitat before adopting passive,
reserve strategies. The alternative selected by the BLM, however, should
be one that will not jeopardize the continued existence of listed species
within the species entire habitat range.

Congress and the Administration must ensure that when the Plan is
finalized that the BLM receives adequate funding so that it can be fully
implemented.

Timber sale revenues must generate at least an amount equal to the funding
that was provided to local counties through the Secure Rural Schools and
Community Self-Determination Act on a yearly basis.

All BLM administered land should be managed to minimize the threat of
catastrophic wildfire on these lands and surrounding state and private
lands.

Access should be maintained through BLM administered lands for private
land access, fire suppression, as well as recreational uses, such as
hunting, fishing, boating and sightseeing.


In summary, the economic viability of our rural communities and the
overall health of our federal forests are of vital importance to me. I
ask that you give these comments full consideration as you prepare the
final Environmental Impact Statement and select the final management plans
for the Western Oregon BLM Districts.

Sincerely,


Terry Silbernagel
503-559-3200

EM-831 Kayla Schroeder <kaylamalayla@hotmail.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/19/2007 13:29:24 Dear BLM,
I live in Oregon for a variety of reasons, including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won't be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon's spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

Thank you for taking the time to read this message.

PS. I do not live in Oregon any longer. However, I have lived there most of my life and love the old growth forests. It would be a sad day when there are no longer any old growth trees left to share their wisdom with the ages. Please do what you can to prevent the destruction of these beautiful creatures. Much appreciation.

Kayla Schroeder
1809 Humphrey St. SE
Olympia, WA 98501
EM-832 Gregory Niles <oceanpulse@cablespeed.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/19/2007 13:45:39 Dear BLM,
I live in Oregon for a variety of reasons, including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, salmon & steelhead fishing, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won?t be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon?s spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

Gregory Niles
428 SW Coast Hwy
Newport, OR 97365
EM-833 Forwarded by alan_hoffmeister@blm.gov Fw: Protect BLM forests and rivers 11/19/2007 14:26:38 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 11/19/2007 02:26 PM -----

Carol McBride <carolmcb@frontiernet.net>

11/19/2007 11:19 AM

To
Alan_Hoffmeister@blm.gov
cc

Subject
Protect BLM forests and rivers








Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue Portland, Oregon
Portland, OR 97208

CC: Oregon Congressional delegation

Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions

Dear BLM,

I am very concerned with the direction the Bush Administration is  
headed in with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of Oregon's  
federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am  
concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating will unravel the  
protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and may lead to  
water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and  
controversy.

The Bush Administration's preferred alternative proposes to clear-cut  
140,000 acres of Oregon's old-growth every decade, build 1,000 mile  
of new logging roads, and create over 100,000 miles of new Off  
Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas-all at the expense of roadless areas,  
threatened species, water quality and non-motorized recreation.

Most Americans want federal land managers to embrace thinning second  
growth forests, safeguard communities from wildfire and protect what  
remains of our nation's ancient forests. Indeed, many Oregon forest  
managers are already moving beyond the conflicts of the past. By  
focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are  
now overgrown and in need of thinning - they are providing wood to  
local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife  
and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

In contrast, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by  
increasing old-growth clear-cutting for a short-term economic fix.  
The WOPR puts water quality at-risk and would destroy some of  
Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature  
and old-growth forests on public land, not clear-cut these natural  
treasures as the WOPR proposes to do.

It is disappointing that at a time when public consensus for old-
growth protection and second-growth thinning has never been stronger,  
the BLM is proposing to clear-cut forests older than our nation and  
turn complex ecosystems into flammable tree farms.

Please protect remaining old-growth forests, focus active management  
of BLM lands in already logged-over areas, and concentrate job  
opportunities in restoration thinning projects that benefit  
watersheds and generate wood products without multiplying past mistakes.

Sincerely,

Carol McBride
9545 Takilma rd.
Cave Junction, OR 97523
EM-834 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 11/19/2007 16:17:18 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


M. Aulenbach
25358 Cherry Creek Road
Monroe, OR 97456
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-835 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 11/19/2007 16:19:35 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


linda lewin
2145 lincoln st
eugene, OR 97405
linda@larrylewin.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-836 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 11/19/2007 16:20:18 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Please don't destroy what remains of Oregon's greatest treasure: its
trees. When the trees are gone, there will be nothing left of our
state. Nothing to visit, no tourism, no fishing, no hiking, no
wildlife...nothing.
Please advocate for alternative building materials and just say no to
more LOGGING.

Sincerely,


Amy Hunter
1963 NW Shattock Place
Corvallis, OR 97330
wildtrax@mac.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-837 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 11/19/2007 16:21:18 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Jenna Boyle
3688 S. Hemlock St.
Tolovana Park, OR 97145

--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-838 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 11/19/2007 16:22:35 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


niki martin
7099 east 475 north
camden in. 46917
niki102_64@hotmail.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-839 "Rudy Butler" <thebutler34@yahoo.com> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision 11/19/2007 17:51:51 Rudy Butler
po box 741
Winchester, OR 97495-0741


November 19, 2007

Edward Shepard
OR/WA State Director
Bureau of Land Management
PO Box 2965
Portland, OR 97208


Dear Edward Shepard:

Please accept the following comments on the BLM's Draft Environmental
Impact Statement for the Revision of the Resource Management Plans for
Western Oregon.

None of the three alternatives presented in the DEIS meet the requirements
of the O&C Act because they do not manage the land for the dominant use of
timber production. Reserving the majority (52%) of the suitable
timberlands for the purpose of a listed species is contrary to the O&C Act.

Because of the unique nature of the O&C Lands, by law these lands are not
available to be part of a reserve system designed to recover a listed
species. The BLM should consider active management for the protection of
listed and sensitive species and their habitat before adopting passive,
reserve strategies. The alternative selected by the BLM, however, should
be one that will not jeopardize the continued existence of listed species
within the species entire habitat range.

The BLM must develop and analyzes at least one alternative that maximizes
the amount of land in timber production and receipts to local county
governments, and meets its no jeopardy obligation.

Congress and the Administration must ensure that when the Plan is
finalized that the BLM receives adequate funding so that it can be fully
implemented.

When implemented, the Plan should live up to the full commitment that was
made to local counties.

Timber sale revenues must generate at least an amount equal to the funding
that was provided to local counties through the Secure Rural Schools and
Community Self-Determination Act on a yearly basis.

All BLM administered land should be managed to minimize the threat of
catastrophic wildfire on these lands and surrounding state and private
lands.

Access should be maintained through BLM administered lands for private
land access, fire suppression, as well as recreational uses, such as
hunting, fishing, boating and sightseeing.

I strongly support, as should we all, the responsible and sustainable
management of these western Oregon federal forests. It is a promotion of
healthy forests, improved air quality, reduction in fuel for forest fires
(which is a significant contributor to global warming), better
accessiblity and visibility for wildlife and humans alike, increased tax
revenue for improving our educational system and management processes,
increased employment leading to increased overall tax revenue which can
result in less crime and an increased value of life.


In summary, the economic viability of our rural communities and the
overall health of our federal forests are of vital importance to me. I
ask that you give these comments full consideration as you prepare the
final Environmental Impact Statement and select the final management plans
for the Western Oregon BLM Districts.

Sincerely,


Rudy Butler

EM-840 "Robin Johnson" <johnsonout2lunch@aol.com> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision 11/19/2007 19:34:27 Robin Johnson
570 Queens Ave.
Lakeside, OR 97449-9621


November 19, 2007

Edward Shepard
OR/WA State Director
Bureau of Land Management
PO Box 2965
Portland, OR 97208


Dear Edward Shepard:

Please accept the following comments on the BLM's Draft Environmental
Impact Statement for the Revision of the Resource Management Plans for
Western Oregon.

None of the three alternatives presented in the DEIS meet the requirements
of the O&C Act because they do not manage the land for the dominant use of
timber production. Reserving the majority (52%) of the suitable
timberlands for the purpose of a listed species is contrary to the O&C Act.

Because of the unique nature of the O&C Lands, by law these lands are not
available to be part of a reserve system designed to recover a listed
species. The BLM should consider active management for the protection of
listed and sensitive species and their habitat before adopting passive,
reserve strategies. The alternative selected by the BLM, however, should
be one that will not jeopardize the continued existence of listed species
within the species entire habitat range.

The BLM must develop and analyzes at least one alternative that maximizes
the amount of land in timber production and receipts to local county
governments, and meets its no jeopardy obligation.

Congress and the Administration must ensure that when the Plan is
finalized that the BLM receives adequate funding so that it can be fully
implemented.

When implemented, the Plan should live up to the full commitment that was
made to local counties.

All BLM administered land should be managed to minimize the threat of
catastrophic wildfire on these lands and surrounding state and private
lands.




Access should be maintained through BLM administered lands for private
land access, fire suppression, as well as recreational uses, such as
hunting, fishing, boating and sightseeing.

Timber sale revenues must generate at least an amount equal to the funding
that was provided to local counties through the Secure Rural Schools and
Community Self-Determination Act on a yearly basis.

In summary, the economic viability of our rural communities and the
overall health of our federal forests are of vital importance to me. I
ask that you give these comments full consideration as you prepare the
final Environmental Impact Statement and select the final management plans
for the Western Oregon BLM Districts.

Sincerely,


Robin Johnson

EM-841 Jonathan Fryer <shizam135@yahoo.com> Protect BLM Forests 11/20/2007 11:09:09 Bureau of Land Management
Oregon/Washington State Office
ATTN: Western Oregon Planning Revision (OR930.1)
PO Box 2965
Portland, Oregon 97208

Dear BLM,

Please accept these comments on the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am a citizen concerned with the management of these lands.

For the last ten years, the Bureau of Land Management administered forests in western Oregon under the Northwest Forest Plan. This ensured these forests continued to provide important public values. These forests can also provide jobs and wood products as a by-product of forest restoration such as thinning young plantation forests.

I am concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating may lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy. Many of these forests are currently protected for water quality, salmon and wildlife concerns.

Much of the BLM forests in western Oregon are adjacent to private landowners who would like to see nearby forest managed to protect their home from wildfire and to preserve their water supply, scenery, and recreation opportunities.

Please continue to protect the western BLM forests that are now protected.

Sincerely,

Jonathan Fryer
1945 Lemming Ave
Eugene, OR 97401
EM-842 Forwarded by alan_hoffmeister@blm.gov Fw: Forests and rivers must live untarnished! 11/21/2007 7:50:35 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 11/21/2007 07:50 AM -----

"tom wilburn" <tomastec@lycos.com>

11/20/2007 10:29 PM

To
<Alan_Hoffmeister@blm.gov>
cc

Subject
Forests and rivers must live untarnished!








Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue Portland, Oregon
Portland, OR 97208

CC: Oregon Congressional delegation

Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions

Dear BLM,

Oregon's forests and rivers are merely toys to the Bush Administration. None of them live here; they have no care for our appreciation of life. It is only a turn of a profit for them.

And when the landscape is bare, eroded, and polluted, what will there be for anyone to look upon? What will be said? "What a wasteland, but it sure was profitable while it lasted... which wasn't too long."

It is childish, as the Bush Administration assumes, that our living forests and rivers can be played with in any way other than care and respect. And when all is done, they don't have to live with the problems of erosion or pollution, but we do.

It is my deepest concern, as an Oregon citizen, that our forests and rivers are being gambled away for short-term profit and political gain,
instead of being left alone for Oregon's future.

Sincerely,
Tom Wilburn
Portland, OR
tomastec@lycos.com
EM-843 Forwarded by alan_hoffmeister@blm.gov Fw: Protect BLM forests and rivers 11/21/2007 10:48:18 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 11/21/2007 10:48 AM -----

Jeanie Taylor <njtay@mac.com>

11/21/2007 10:14 AM

To
Alan_Hoffmeister@blm.gov
cc

Subject
Protect BLM forests and rivers








Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue Portland, Oregon
Portland, OR 97208

CC: Oregon Congressional delegation

Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions

Dear BLM,

I own forest land in Oregon and I am very concerned with the direction
the Bush Administration is headed with the management of nearly 2.6
million acres of Oregon's federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan
Revisions. I am concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating
will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and
may lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict
and controversy.

The Bush Administration's preferred alternative proposes to clear-cut
140,000 acres of Oregon's old-growth every decade, build 1,000 mile of
new logging roads, and create over 100,000 miles of new Off Highway
Vehicle Emphasis Areas-all at the expense of roadless areas, threatened
species, water quality and non-motorized recreation.

Most Americans want federal land managers to embrace thinning second
growth forests, safeguard communities from wildfire and protect what
remains of our nation's ancient forests. Indeed, many Oregon forest
managers are already moving beyond the conflicts of the past. By
focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are
now overgrown and in need of thinning - they are providing wood to
local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife
and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

In contrast, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing
old-growth clear-cutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts
water quality at-risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special
places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests
on public land, not clear-cut these natural treasures as the WOPR
proposes to do.

It is disappointing that at a time when public consensus for old-growth
protection and second-growth thinning has never been stronger, the BLM
is proposing to clear-cut forests older than our nation and turn
complex ecosystems into flammable tree farms.

Please protect remaining old-growth forests, focus active management of
BLM lands in already logged-over areas, and concentrate job
opportunities in restoration thinning projects that benefit watersheds
and generate wood products without multiplying past mistakes.

Sincerely,

Jeanie Taylor
17701 SW Gopher Valley Road
Sheridan, OR
EM-844 "Russell Minten" <russ@mapforesters.com> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision 11/21/2007 13:11:52 Russell Minten
19170 S. Molalla Ave
Oregon City, OR 97045-8975


November 21, 2007

Edward Shepard
OR/WA State Director
Bureau of Land Management
PO Box 2965
Portland, OR 97208


Dear Edward Shepard:

Please accept the following comments on the BLM's Draft Environmental
Impact Statement for the Revision of the Resource Management Plans for
Western Oregon.

Because of the unique nature of the O&C Lands, by law these lands are not
available to be part of a reserve system designed to recover a listed
species. The BLM should consider active management for the protection of
listed and sensitive species and their habitat before adopting passive,
reserve strategies. The alternative selected by the BLM, however, should
be one that will not jeopardize the continued existence of listed species
within the species entire habitat range.

When implemented, the Plan should live up to the full commitment that was
made to local counties.

Timber sale revenues must generate at least an amount equal to the funding
that was provided to local counties through the Secure Rural Schools and
Community Self-Determination Act on a yearly basis.

In summary, the economic viability of our rural communities and the
overall health of our federal forests are of vital importance to me. I
ask that you give these comments full consideration as you prepare the
final Environmental Impact Statement and select the final management plans
for the Western Oregon BLM Districts.

Sincerely,


Russell Minten
503-655-5524

EM-845 Lynne Brannan <lynnesline@comcast.net> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/21/2007 13:38:31 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Lynne Brannan
6023 SW 174 ave
Beaverton, OR 97007

503-649-0184
EM-846 "Gary Butts" <garybutts@munnell-sherrill.com> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision 11/21/2007 15:03:47 Gary Butts
P.O. Box 13249
Portland, OR 97213-0249


November 21, 2007

Edward Shepard
OR/WA State Director
Bureau of Land Management
PO Box 2965
Portland, OR 97208


Dear Edward Shepard:

Please accept the following comments on the BLM's Draft Environmental
Impact Statement for the Revision of the Resource Management Plans for
Western Oregon.

None of the three alternatives presented in the DEIS meet the requirements
of the O&C Act because they do not manage the land for the dominant use of
timber production. Reserving the majority (52%) of the suitable
timberlands for the purpose of a listed species is contrary to the O&C Act.

Because of the unique nature of the O&C Lands, by law these lands are not
available to be part of a reserve system designed to recover a listed
species. The BLM should consider active management for the protection of
listed and sensitive species and their habitat before adopting passive,
reserve strategies. The alternative selected by the BLM, however, should
be one that will not jeopardize the continued existence of listed species
within the species entire habitat range.

The BLM must develop and analyzes at least one alternative that maximizes
the amount of land in timber production and receipts to local county
governments, and meets its no jeopardy obligation.

Congress and the Administration must ensure that when the Plan is
finalized that the BLM receives adequate funding so that it can be fully
implemented.

When implemented, the Plan should live up to the full commitment that was
made to local counties.

Timber sale revenues must generate at least an amount equal to the funding
that was provided to local counties through the Secure Rural Schools and
Community Self-Determination Act on a yearly basis.

All BLM administered land should be managed to minimize the threat of
catastrophic wildfire on these lands and surrounding state and private
lands.

All BLM administered land should be managed to minimize the threat of
catastrophic wildfire on these lands and surrounding state and private
lands.

Access should be maintained through BLM administered lands for private
land access, fire suppression, as well as recreational uses, such as
hunting, fishing, boating and sightseeing.

In summary, the economic viability of our rural communities and the
overall health of our federal forests are of vital importance to me. I
ask that you give these comments full consideration as you prepare the
final Environmental Impact Statement and select the final management plans
for the Western Oregon BLM Districts.

Sincerely,


Gary L. Butts
503-704-4111

EM-847 Ian Shelley <ianjs@comcast.net> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/21/2007 15:38:46 Dear BLM,
I live in Oregon for a variety of reasons, including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won?t be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon?s spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

Ian Shelley
9158 SW Wilshire St.
Portland, OR 97225
EM-848 Dennis Pennell <dennisnpennell@yahoo.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/21/2007 16:46:00 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Dennis Pennell
402 NE 136th Way
Vancouver, WA 98685
EM-849 Elena Pintilie <elena.pintilie@care2.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/22/2007 8:05:11 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Elena Pintilie
78 Howard Park
Toronto, ON M6R
EM-850 Gail Battaglia <gailbee@ccountry.net> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/22/2007 9:31:00 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Gail Battaglia
1999 Little Applegate Rd
Jacksonville, OR 97530
EM-851 gina hall <ghallway@hotmail.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/22/2007 18:11:59 Dear BLM,
I live in Oregon for a variety of reasons, including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won?t be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon?s spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

gina hall
531 clay st
ashlnad, OR 97520
EM-852 Takuji Soyama <tsoyama@desu.ne.jp> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/22/2007 22:25:13 Dear BLM,
I live in Oregon for a variety of reasons, including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won?t be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon?s spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

Takuji Soyama
2-14-15 Higashiabiko
306 PatioSquareTennoudai
Abiko-si, ot 270-1144
EM-853 "Elaine Broskie M.D." <ebroskie@msn.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/23/2007 8:34:01 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Elaine Broskie M.D.
525 Glen Creek NW #240
Salem, OR 97304
EM-854 jackie sauriol <jacko@spiritone.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/24/2007 7:20:19 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

jackie sauriol
4815 n commercial
portland, OR 97217
EM-855 Sean Brady <sa_brady@comcast.net> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/24/2007 21:29:13 Dear BLM,
My family and I live in Oregon. My wife and I are new parents and we choose to live and raise our family in Oregon for its beauty, for including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my family's ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy. I am a fly-fisherman who wants to take his newborn son fishing in pure streams surrounded by old-growth forests. The current BLM plan will make sure that does not happen, and will ensure that even my grandchildren will not receive the benefits of old-growth forests.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won't be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy, including my family. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon?s spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

Sean Brady
1124 E 14
Lafayette, OR 97127
EM-856 Chris Keck <Chris_Keck2000@yahoo.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/25/2007 18:24:16 Dear BLM,
I live in Oregon for a variety of reasons, including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won?t be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon?s spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

Chris Keck
5735 N. Montana Ave.
Portland, OR 97217

503-830-5833
EM-857 stuart phillips <stulips@hotmail.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/25/2007 19:01:41 Dear BLM,
I live in Oregon for a variety of reasons, including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won?t be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon?s spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

stuart phillips
212 benjamin
eugene, OR 97404

541-461-1384
EM-858 Forwarded by alan_hoffmeister@blm.gov Fw: Protect BLM forests and rivers 11/26/2007 7:51:18 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 11/26/2007 07:51 AM -----

Liz Byrd <ebyrdie@aol.com>

11/24/2007 07:29 AM

To
Alan_Hoffmeister@blm.gov
cc

Subject
Protect BLM forests and rivers








Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue Portland, Oregon
Portland, OR 97208

CC: Oregon Congressional delegation

Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions

Dear BLM,

I am very concerned with the direction the Bush Administration is  
headed in with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of Oregon's  
federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am  
concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating will unravel the  
protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and may lead to  
water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and  
controversy.

The Bush Administration's preferred alternative proposes to clear-cut  
140,000 acres of Oregon's old-growth every decade, build 1,000 mile  
of new logging roads, and create over 100,000 miles of new Off  
Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas-all at the expense of roadless areas,  
threatened species, water quality and non-motorized recreation.

Most Americans want federal land managers to embrace thinning second  
growth forests, safeguard communities from wildfire and protect what  
remains of our nation's ancient forests. Indeed, many Oregon forest  
managers are already moving beyond the conflicts of the past. By  
focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are  
now overgrown and in need of thinning - they are providing wood to  
local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife  
and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

In contrast, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by  
increasing old-growth clear-cutting for a short-term economic fix.  
The WOPR puts water quality at-risk and would destroy some of  
Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature  
and old-growth forests on public land, not clear-cut these natural  
treasures as the WOPR proposes to do.

It is disappointing that at a time when public consensus for old-
growth protection and second-growth thinning has never been stronger,  
the BLM is proposing to clear-cut forests older than our nation and  
turn complex ecosystems into flammable tree farms.

Please protect remaining old-growth forests, focus active management  
of BLM lands in already logged-over areas, and concentrate job  
opportunities in restoration thinning projects that benefit  
watersheds and generate wood products without multiplying past mistakes.

Sincerely,

Liz Byrd
Eugene, Oregon
EM-859 Forwarded by alan_hoffmeister@blm.gov Fw: Protect BLM forests and rivers 11/26/2007 8:57:35 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 11/26/2007 08:57 AM -----

Kenneth Freudenberg <kfreud@earthlink.net>

11/26/2007 08:58 PM

To
Alan_Hoffmeister@blm.gov
cc

Subject
Protect BLM forests and rivers








Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue Portland, Oregon
Portland, OR 97208

CC: Oregon Congressional delegation

Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions

Dear BLM,

I am very concerned with the direction the Bush Administration is  
headed in with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of Oregon's  
federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am  
concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating will unravel the  
protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and may lead to  
water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and  
controversy.

The Bush Administration's preferred alternative proposes to clear-cut  
140,000 acres of Oregon's old-growth every decade, build 1,000 mile  
of new logging roads, and create over 100,000 miles of new Off  
Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas-all at the expense of roadless areas,  
threatened species, water quality and non-motorized recreation.

Most Americans want federal land managers to embrace thinning second  
growth forests, safeguard communities from wildfire and protect what  
remains of our nation's ancient forests. Indeed, many Oregon forest  
managers are already moving beyond the conflicts of the past. By  
focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are  
now overgrown and in need of thinning - they are providing wood to  
local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife  
and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

In contrast, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by  
increasing old-growth clear-cutting for a short-term economic fix.  
The WOPR puts water quality at-risk and would destroy some of  
Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature  
and old-growth forests on public land, not clear-cut these natural  
treasures as the WOPR proposes to do.

It is disappointing that at a time when public consensus for old-
growth protection and second-growth thinning has never been stronger,  
the BLM is proposing to clear-cut forests older than our nation and  
turn complex ecosystems into flammable tree farms.

Please protect remaining old-growth forests, focus active management  
of BLM lands in already logged-over areas, and concentrate job  
opportunities in restoration thinning projects that benefit  
watersheds and generate wood products without multiplying past mistakes.

Sincerely,

Betty Freudenberg
P.O. Box 768
North Bend, OR 97459-0060
EM-860 Forwarded by alan_hoffmeister@blm.gov Fw: Protect BLM forests and the environment 11/26/2007 10:25:02 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 11/26/2007 10:24 AM -----

Marilyn Madden <madden@jeffnet.org>

11/26/2007 10:05 AM

To
Alan_Hoffmeister@blm.gov
cc

Subject
Protect BLM forests and the environment








Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue Portland, Oregon
Portland, OR 97208

CC: Oregon Congressional delegation

Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions

Dear BLM,

I would like to express my opposition to the Western Oregon Planning  
Revision 2, specifically the increase to 110,000 acres of the BLM  
forests devoted to timber production, and the designation of areas,  
mostly around Medford, for off-highway vehicle emphasis.

Such an emphasis on timber production seems to me to be short-
sighted.  Athough it would  provide temporary income to communities  
in southern Oregon, we cannot be sure how  long it would last.  In  
addition, increased logging would have serious environmental  
consequences, such as the pollution of steams and the loss of habitat  
for wildlife.  But most serious would be the
release of CO2 into the atmosphere, contributing to global warming.  
At a time when we know that global warming could very well become  
catastrophic, such an action would be unconscionable.  We should  
instead investigate how, by keeping the trees standing, we can "sell"  
them, on a "cap and  trade" basis, as sink holes for CO2.  This would  
provide a stable, long-term, far-sighted source of income for our  
communities, while enabling us to contribute towards fighting the  
most important environmental  threat of  our time.

I live in Jacksonville.  One of the areas proposed for off-highway  
vehicles is Johns Park, near my town.  Jacksonville is a small.  
historical community, and people living here value their peace and  
quiet and security, which would be destroyed by the location of an  
OHV area close to town. It is totally unjust that this area should  
have been designated for this purpose by the BLM, without any  
consideration whatsoever of the effect it would have on nearby  
residents.  I am particularly incensed by the choice of Johns Park  
because it directly affects me.  But inhabitants living near other  
chosen locations must surely feel the same way.

For the reasons mentioned above, I request  that the Western Oregon  
Planning Revision 2 be dropped in favor of the original Northwest  
Forest Plan, a compromise arrived at after a long period  of  
negotiation by all interested parties.

Sincerely,

Marilyn I. Madden

PO Box 1564
Jacksonville, Oregon 97530

e-mail: madden@jeffnet.org
EM-861 Stanley Robinson <robinsonsculpture@msn.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/26/2007 11:52:03 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Stanley Robinson
940 SW 10th
Corvallis, OR 97333
EM-862 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 11/26/2007 12:16:25 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


adam smedstad
402 south first st
silverton oregon, 97381
addameight@yaho.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-863 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 11/26/2007 12:17:18 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Leah Mccoy
119 n.e. columbia ave
Adair Village 97330
princesslea420@msn.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-864 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 11/26/2007 12:17:54 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


David Richardson
3639 Kendra st
Eugene, OR 97404
eastern032000@yahoo.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-865 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 11/26/2007 12:18:58 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Rhine Chesshire
119 n.e. columbia ave
Adair Village, OR 97330
rhinewc@msn.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-866 Heidi Moore <hmoore@pdx.edu> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/26/2007 14:06:11 Dear BLM,
I live in Oregon for a variety of reasons, including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won?t be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon?s spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

Heidi Moore
2374 SE 58th
Portland, OR 97214

503.236.0012
EM-867 Forwarded by alan_hoffmeister@blm.gov BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions 11/26/2007 15:51:29 Our records show that you have submitted electronic comments on the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions.  http://www.blm.gov/or/plans/wopr

Would you like your e-mail address added to our electronic update list?  You would only receive 3 - e-mail messages in the future as we finalize the plan revisions.  Your e-mail address will not be shared with others.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
R. Alan Hoffmeister
Bureau of Land Management
Communications - Public Involvement
Western Oregon Plan Revisions Project
http://www.blm.gov/or/plans/wopr
alan_hoffmeister@or.blm.gov
Phone:  503-808-6629
EM-868 Daniel Gee <danandmaya@gmail.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/26/2007 19:15:24 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Daniel Gee
18964 Little Lake Road
Blachly, OR 97412
EM-869 Tom Sanchez <caribeno@sbcglobal.net> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/27/2007 11:27:28 Dear BLM,
I don't live in Oregon however ecological balance knows no state nor national boundaries. Oregon's geography has old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won?t be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon?s spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

Tom Sanchez
2250 Dorris Place
Los Angeles, CA 90031
EM-870 "Cliff Silbernagel" <cactuss2@msn.com> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision 11/27/2007 19:22:03 Cliff Silbernagel
43200 Sub-Station Dr.
Stayton, OR 97383-9715


November 27, 2007

Edward Shepard
OR/WA State Director
Bureau of Land Management
PO Box 2965
Portland, OR 97208


Dear Edward Shepard:

Please accept the following comments on the BLM's Draft Environmental
Impact Statement for the Revision of the Resource Management Plans for
Western Oregon.

None of the three alternatives presented in the DEIS meet the requirements
of the O&C Act because they do not manage the land for the dominant use of
timber production. Reserving the majority (52%) of the suitable
timberlands for the purpose of a listed species is contrary to the O&C Act.

Because of the unique nature of the O&C Lands, by law these lands are not
available to be part of a reserve system designed to recover a listed
species. The BLM should consider active management for the protection of
listed and sensitive species and their habitat before adopting passive,
reserve strategies. The alternative selected by the BLM, however, should
be one that will not jeopardize the continued existence of listed species
within the species entire habitat range.

The BLM must develop and analyzes at least one alternative that maximizes
the amount of land in timber production and receipts to local county
governments, and meets its no jeopardy obligation.

Congress and the Administration must ensure that when the Plan is
finalized that the BLM receives adequate funding so that it can be fully
implemented.

When implemented, the Plan should live up to the full commitment that was
made to local counties.

Timber sale revenues must generate at least an amount equal to the funding
that was provided to local counties through the Secure Rural Schools and
Community Self-Determination Act on a yearly basis.

All BLM administered land should be managed to minimize the threat of
catastrophic wildfire on these lands and surrounding state and private
lands.

Access should be maintained through BLM administered lands for private
land access, fire suppression, as well as recreational uses, such as
hunting, fishing, boating and sightseeing.

In summary, the economic viability of our rural communities and the
overall health of our federal forests are of vital importance to me. I
ask that you give these comments full consideration as you prepare the
final Environmental Impact Statement and select the final management plans
for the Western Oregon BLM Districts.

Sincerely,


Cliff & Debbie Silbernagel
5037692314

EM-871 "Jerald Bishop" <darcyjerry@charter.net> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision 11/28/2007 8:06:05 Jerald Bishop
1628 carnahan dr
grants pass, OR 97527-4724


November 28, 2007

Edward Shepard
OR/WA State Director
Bureau of Land Management
PO Box 2965
Portland, OR 97208


Dear Edward Shepard:

Please accept the following comments on the BLM's Draft Environmental
Impact Statement for the Revision of the Resource Management Plans for
Western Oregon.

I have worked in the forested areas of SW oregon for 30 years. Although I
have never participated directly in logging activities I have helped clean
up, reforest, and protect those lands. My labor adds up to stewarding
about 1000 acres of forest personally. My interest and observations span
the years when policy shifts have been driven by scape-goating and psuedo
science. Still, the forest continues to heal itself and a rotating use
offers all the bounty available. I have witnessed remarkable recovery and
consider 52% too large a reserve factor. Please reconsider a more
equitable allotment for our continuous access and use. Sincerely
Jerald V Bishop

In summary, the economic viability of our rural communities and the
overall health of our federal forests are of vital importance to me. I
ask that you give these comments full consideration as you prepare the
final Environmental Impact Statement and select the final management plans
for the Western Oregon BLM Districts.

Sincerely,


Jerald V Bishop
541 830 3100

EM-872 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 11/28/2007 15:20:31 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Amanda Meade
352 Sw butterfield pl
corvallis, or 97333
suzcreamchees@msn.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-873 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 11/28/2007 15:21:27 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Joel Donmoyer
352 SW Butterfield PL
Corvallis, OR 97333
vagabonditos@yahoo.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-874 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 11/28/2007 15:22:07 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Aaron Breakstone
24 NE 58th Ave.
Portland, OR 97213
abreaks@hotmail.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-875 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 11/28/2007 15:22:48 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Peter Bosa
3907 N. Gantenbein Ave, Apt A
Portland, OR 97227
pbosa@hotmail.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-876 Barbara Jansen <bjj@proaxis.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 11/29/2007 9:52:54 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Barbara Jansen
31618 Bryant Way
Albany, OR 97321

541-928-1743
EM-877 "Will Lawrence" <will@leiinc.com> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision 11/29/2007 13:24:50 Will Lawrence
2468 W 11th ave. Suite B
Eugene, OR 97402-3314


November 29, 2007

Edward Shepard
OR/WA State Director
Bureau of Land Management
PO Box 2965
Portland, OR 97208


Dear Edward Shepard:

Please accept the following comments on the BLM's Draft Environmental
Impact Statement for the Revision of the Resource Management Plans for
Western Oregon.

I support Alternative 2.

In summary, the economic viability of our rural communities and the
overall health of our federal forests are of vital importance to me. I
ask that you give these comments full consideration as you prepare the
final Environmental Impact Statement and select the final management plans
for the Western Oregon BLM Districts.

Sincerely,


Will Lawrence

EM-885 Forwarded by alan_hoffmeister@blm.gov Fw: No to WOPR 12/3/2007 8:46:01 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 12/03/2007 08:45 AM -----

"Lynn Ackler" <ackler@sou.edu>

12/02/2007 03:42 PM

To
<alan.hoffmeister@blm.gov>
cc

Subject
No to WOPR








Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue, Portland, OR 97208

Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions


Dear BLM,

I am very concerned with the direction the Bush Administration is headed with the
management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.


The Bush Administration would place half of the public land that the BLM manages and most of our best old-growth BLM forests in Timber Management Areas to be clear-cut every 80 years. The Bush Administration's preferred alternative proposes to clear-cut 110,000 acres of Oregon's old-growth (120+ years) and build 1,000 mile of new logging roads every decade while creating over 100,000 miles of new Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas all at the expense of roadless areas, threatened species, water quality and non-motorized recreation. Shockingly, the proposal ignores the role that these forests play in regulating the climate.

Most Americans want federal land managers to embrace thinning second growth forests, safeguard communities from wildfire and protect what remains of our nation's ancient forests. Indeed, many Oregon forest managers are already moving beyond the conflicts of the past. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - they are providing wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

In contrast, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth
clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

It is disappointing that at a time when public consensus for old-growth protection and second-growth thinning has never been stronger, the BLM is proposing to clear-cut forests older than our nation and turn complex ecosystems into tree plantations most susceptible to severe wildfire.

Please protect remaining old-growth forests, focus active management of BLM lands in already logged-over areas, and create job opportunities in restoration thinning projects that benefit watersheds and generate wood products without multiplying past mistakes.

I am opposed to the designation of 13 "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" concentrating OHV use on more than 100,000 acres in the area between Ashland, Jacksonville, Gold Hill, Rogue River, Grants Pass and Illinois Valley.  More than half of the acreage is privately held- not BLM land.  The plan encourages OHV usage and actively discourages other forms of quiet type recreation .  Focusing on OHV use when all other outdoor recreation is far greater  is a serious mistake.  I do not want more OHV use in our surrounding areas.  This kind of activity is not appropreate for or in the best interest for the homeowners who live within or near the boundaries and has significant negative implications for the future of outdoor tourism for this entire area.  OHV use is polluting both to the air and the quiet of this area and encourages the production of greenhouse emissions that further deteriorate the environment.  I hike in these regions frequently, and OHV within miles of
where I hike could be heard and would destroy my enjoyment and that of many others hiking in these areas.

The WOPR ignores environmental protections in the O&C Act as well as the Endangered Species Act, the Clean Water Act and other laws put in place to protect the forests and streams.  The WOPR puts creating more tree plantations ahead of protecting clean water, wildlife habitat, responsible recreation or producing a reliable small diameter wood supply.

Sincerely,


Lynn Ackler, PhD
8661 Wagner Creek Rd
Talent OR 97540


CC:

Senator Ron Wyden
1220 SW 3rd Ave., Suite 585, Portland, OR 97204

Senator Gordon Smith
121 SW Salmon St., Suite 1250, Portland, OR 97204

Rep. Greg Walden (R-2nd)
843 East Main Street, Ste 400, Medford, OR 97504



EM-879 Forwarded by alan_hoffmeister@blm.gov Fw: Protect BLM forests and rivers 11/30/2007 15:00:43 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 11/30/2007 03:00 PM -----

Ara Johnson <ramblin.rose@earthlink.net>

11/30/2007 11:20 AM

To
Alan_Hoffmeister@blm.gov
cc

Subject
Protect BLM forests and rivers








Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue Portland, Oregon
Portland, OR 97208

CC: Oregon Congressional delegation

Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions

Dear BLM,

I am very concerned with the direction the Bush Administration is  
headed in with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of Oregon's  
federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am  
concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating will unravel the  
protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and may lead to  
water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and  
controversy.

The Bush Administration's preferred alternative proposes to clear-cut  
140,000 acres of Oregon's old-growth every decade, build 1,000 mile  
of new logging roads, and create over 100,000 miles of new Off  
Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas-all at the expense of roadless areas,  
threatened species, water quality and non-motorized recreation.

Most Americans want federal land managers to embrace thinning second  
growth forests, safeguard communities from wildfire and protect what  
remains of our nation's ancient forests. Indeed, many Oregon forest  
managers are already moving beyond the conflicts of the past. By  
focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are  
now overgrown and in need of thinning - they are providing wood to  
local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife  
and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

In contrast, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by  
increasing old-growth clear-cutting for a short-term economic fix.  
The WOPR puts water quality at-risk and would destroy some of  
Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature  
and old-growth forests on public land, not clear-cut these natural  
treasures as the WOPR proposes to do.

It is disappointing that at a time when public consensus for old-
growth protection and second-growth thinning has never been stronger,  
the BLM is proposing to clear-cut forests older than our nation and  
turn complex ecosystems into flammable tree farms.

Please protect remaining old-growth forests, focus active management  
of BLM lands in already logged-over areas, and concentrate job  
opportunities in restoration thinning projects that benefit  
watersheds and generate wood products without multiplying past mistakes.

Sincerely,

Ara Johnson                
133 Nutley St.
Ashland OR 97520
EM-880 Jeanne Raymond <raymondj@peak.org> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/1/2007 7:15:45 Dear BLM,
Having walked through the od grwoth on Mary's Peak with my family, I deplore the clear cutting of these ancient trees. It should be preserved for the unique habitat that it is; for the other forest life, for the health of the watersheds, for all of us in the Vallley.

I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Jeanne Raymond
3430 NW Elmwood Dr
Corvallis, OR 97330
EM-881 "Gaya Glass" <gayaglass@hughes.net> WOPR Public Comment 12/2/2007 13:49:56 DAN LEHMAN

39107 Hileman Rd.

Marcola, OR 97454

(541) 933-2258

 

 

Public Comments

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions

P.O Box 2965

Portland, OR 97208

 

I urge the BLM to Maintain Current Management, the No Action Alternative, at this time.

 

The Draft Environmental Impact Statement terms "structurally complex stands" as large, older growth trees.  Their importance is recognized in ecosystem sustainability.  The large trees are also the most resistant to fire.

 

As Big trees are vital to forest health, I suggest looking at successful examples like the Boaz and Siuslaw Forests projects.  These are models of thinning designed to achieve better utilization through cutting smaller diameter logs.  BLM plantations could offer more than 2 billion board feet of commercially valuable timber over the next two decades if actively thinned.  Investment in Oregon mills that process logs smaller than 9 inches in diameter doubled from 1994 to 2003, making the proposition feasible.  It makes sense to focus on less ecologically valuable stands.

 

According to a 2002BLM NW Forest Plan Report "recent studies show sound scientific basis for proceeding with thinning of young stands in order to enhance and accelerate forest stands more towards old-growth characteristics."  In the same 2002 Report it says the BLM aims toward "soil productivity improvement, improvement in forest ecosystem health, watershed restoration and maintenance, and improvement of wildlife and fish habitat, control of noxious and exotic weeds, and the reestablishment of native species".  Maintenance of current management is the way to better accomplish these goals than Alternatives 1, 2, 3 or 4.

 

As a "Green" consumer, I would like to see our Oregon BLM forests certified as  sustainable, managed forests, by the international, non-profit Forest Stewardship Council, (FSC) which is headquartered in Germany.  Among the criteria they use to asses the sustainability of forest management include: "harvesting trees only at a rate that can be sustained indefinitely, with growth of new trees adequate to replace felled trees; sparing of forests of special conservation value, such as old-growth forests, which should not be converted into homogenous tree plantations; long-term preservation of biodiversity, nutrient recycling, soil integrity, and other forest ecosystem functions; protection of watersheds, and maintenance of adequately wide riparian zones along streams and lakes; a long term management plan; acceptable off-site disposal of chemicals and waste; obedience of prevailing laws; and acknowledgment of the rights of communities and forest workers.  They also check the supply chain, that the certified materials are not mixed with non-certified materials on the way to market." 

 

"The FSC does not certify forests itself:  instead, it accredits forest certification organizations that actually visit a forest and spend up to two weeks inspecting it.  There are a dozen such organizations around the world, all of them accredited to operate internationally."  The closest to Oregon is Scientific Certification Systems, headquartered in California; also, Smartwood is headquartered in Vermont. 

 

"When FSC certification was first introduced, there was much fear that certified products would indeed end up costing more, either because of the expense of the certification audit or of the forestry practices necessary for certification.  Much subsequent experience has shown that certification usually does not add to a wood product's inherent cost.  In cases where markets did price certified products higher than comparable non-certified ones, that turned out to be due just to the laws of supply and demand rather than inherent costs." 

 

If BLM asks for and receives certification from FSC that its forests are managed in a sustainable way, then the public can know it is supporting a positive thing that will help carry us into a healthy future.

 

Thank you for Maintaining the Current Management, the No Action Alternative, at this time. 

 

We encourage the Oregon BLM to ask the Forest Stewardship Council to certify its forests.

 

Thank you,

 

 

 

 

 

 

Acknowledgements to Jared Diamond, from:  Collapse, How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed, published by Viking/Penguin Group: pp.473-478 information on the Forest Stewardship Council.

 
EM-882 "Al and Lona Pierce" <alkpierce@colcenter.org> WOPR comment 12/2/2007 16:38:34 Dec. 3, 2007                                                                            Lona Pierce

                                                                                                56498 Crest Drive

                                                                                                Warren, OR 97053

 

Comment to be included for proposed WORP on BLM lands

 

I attended the public forum presented in Scappoose by BLM personnel on proposed changes to management of BLM sections in Oregon. My comments are specifically in regard to Columbia County.

The cumulative effect of logging in this county has resulted in virtually all of the forestland being logged at least once, with a few mature trees left standing in scattered locations -- mostly on BLM lands, or a few small-woodlands owned by families. The vast majority of timber industry lands have been logged twice, resulting in third-growth tree farms covering more than 80 percent of the county, with the total approaching over 90 percent as logging continues

The only sections not logged at the maximum allowed under the Oregon Forest Practices Act are BLM lands. Those sections that have forests at or approaching 80 years old are the only place where local residents can recreate, gather mushrooms, hunt, hike, birdwatch and other outdoor activities in forests that still maintain much of the original complexity of Oregon temperate rainforests. These are the only sections with enough variety in vegetation to offer suitable habitat for many forest-dwelling species of wildlife. In Columbia County, the public has no access to good-quality forests except on lightly logged O & C lands.

Although O & C lands are supposed to generate funds from timber, they are also supposed to provide recreation, and protect watersheds and wildlife. Scientists have confirmed that the proposed Alternative 2 will fail in all of the above. They recognize that Alternative two does not follow federal law in regard to the ESA and Clean Water Act. The EPA recognizes that Alternative 2 will not protect federally endangered species.

Unless additional sections in Columbia County are managed as late-successional reserves or as landscape sections than are proposed, complex temperate rainforests will be extirpated in Columbia County. This is contrary to federal and state mandates to provide multiple uses while safeguarding watersheds and wildlife habitat.

The argument that there are BLM sections elsewhere in the state that fulfill those requirements does nothing for habitat, recreation, and water quality in Columbia County. Residents here should not have to drive a hundred miles or more to reach forestland to gather mushrooms, hunt, or hike when BLM sections are within a few miles from the most populated areas of the county. BLM sections should not be managed as industrial tree farms.

Recent studies have shown that Northwest forest birds are becoming rare. We have an obligation to not add more species to the Endangered Species List, let alone not protect those already on it. Grouse, owls, thrushes, woodpeckers, evening grosbeaks are all falling in numbers because of logging. Many mammals are also disappearing from the Pacific Northwest, including forest bats and fur-bearers in the martin family. They all need complex forests.  By proposing to essentially eliminate forests from Columbia County, migrating birds will find nowhere to go as they pass through or try to overwinter here. Alternative 2 will likely extirpate hundreds of plant and animal species from Columbia County. This is indefensible.

I doubt if in the 1930s the authors of the O& C lands rules could have envisioned the total extirpation of forests from large regions of the Pacific Northwest, in part due to the mandate to harvest timber. The O & C rules also mandate other uses be preserved.  This will not be done under Alternative 2., which I strongly oppose.

Alternative 2 will dash any hope that salmon runs and water quality can be improved in the Scappoose and Milton Creek watersheds, and Clatskanie watershed. Even the Nehelem River headwaters start in the Bunker Hill area, and flows through BLM sections. The narrow riparian buffers and clearcutting on the hills above these stream systems will ruin their water quality and quantity.

I strongly recommend No Action, with the addition of four entire sections to be managed as complex late-successional forests. Sections must be those that have significant stands of trees approaching or exceeding 80 years old. Gunner's Lake region, Tater Hill, the section next to Scaponia Park, and second-growth in the Chapman area are all excellent candidates to manage as late successional stands.

Even though Columbia County BLM sections do not have unlogged old growth, they do maintain complex forests that are approaching old-growth status. The BLM is obligated to not only provide funding through logging, but also maintain sections that offer local residents recreational opportunities, protect water quality, and not extirpate plants, animals, and ecosystems on its lands. In order to fulfill its responsibility, the BLM should manage at least three thousand acres as complex late-succession forest in Columbia County, focusing on sections with stands that have not been logged for fifty years or more. Alternative two must be rejected outright. No Action is the minimum required to fulfill local needs, although adding four late-succession sections is highly recommended over present management strategies.

 
EM-883 Forwarded by alan_hoffmeister@blm.gov Fw: Protect BLM forests and rivers 12/3/2007 8:40:34 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 12/03/2007 08:40 AM -----

A Lesan <aalesan@mac.com>

12/01/2007 09:13 PM

To
Alan_Hoffmeister@blm.gov
cc

Subject
Protect BLM forests and rivers








Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue Portland, Oregon
Portland, OR 97208

CC: Oregon Congressional delegation

Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions

Dear BLM,

I am very concerned with the direction the Bush Administration is  
headed in with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of Oregon's  
federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am  
concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating will unravel the  
protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and may lead to  
water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and  
controversy.

The Bush Administration's preferred alternative proposes to clear-cut  
140,000 acres of Oregon's old-growth every decade, build 1,000 mile  
of new logging roads, and create over 100,000 miles of new Off  
Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas-all at the expense of roadless areas,  
threatened species, water quality and non-motorized recreation.

Most Americans want federal land managers to embrace thinning second  
growth forests, safeguard communities from wildfire and protect what  
remains of our nation's ancient forests. Indeed, many Oregon forest  
managers are already moving beyond the conflicts of the past. By  
focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are  
now overgrown and in need of thinning - they are providing wood to  
local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife  
and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

In contrast, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by  
increasing old-growth clear-cutting for a short-term economic fix.  
The WOPR puts water quality at-risk and would destroy some of  
Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature  
and old-growth forests on public land, not clear-cut these natural  
treasures as the WOPR proposes to do.

It is disappointing that at a time when public consensus for old-
growth protection and second-growth thinning has never been stronger,  
the BLM is proposing to clear-cut forests older than our nation and  
turn complex ecosystems into flammable tree farms.

Please protect remaining old-growth forests, focus active management  
of BLM lands in already logged-over areas, and concentrate job  
opportunities in restoration thinning projects that benefit  
watersheds and generate wood products without multiplying past mistakes.

Sincerely,

Amy Lesan
952 SE Dorothy Ave
Corvallis, OR 97333
EM-884 Forwarded by alan_hoffmeister@blm.gov Fw: No to WOPR 12/3/2007 8:45:30 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 12/03/2007 08:45 AM -----

"lowengart@jeffnet.org" <lowengart@jeffnet.org>

12/02/2007 02:55 PM

Please respond to
lowengart@jeffnet.org



To
alan.hoffmeister@blm.gov
cc

Subject
No to WOPR









Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue, Portland, OR 97208

Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions


Dear BLM,

I am very concerned with the direction the Bush Administration is headed with the
management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan
Revisions. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is contemplating will unravel the
protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution,
degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.


The Bush Administration would place half of the public land that the BLM manages and most
of our best old-growth BLM forests in Timber Management Areas to be clear-cut every 80
years. The Bush Administration's preferred alternative proposes to clear-cut 110,000
acres of Oregon's old-growth (120+ years) and build 1,000 mile of new logging roads every
decade while creating over 100,000 miles of new Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas all at
the expense of roadless areas, threatened species, water quality and non-motorized
recreation. Shockingly, the proposal ignores the role that these forests play in
regulating the climate.

Most Americans want federal land managers to embrace thinning second growth forests,
safeguard communities from wildfire and protect what remains of our nation's ancient
forests. Indeed, many Oregon forest managers are already moving beyond the conflicts of
the past. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now
overgrown and in need of thinning - they are providing wood to local mills while actually
improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth
forests.

In contrast, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth
clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would
destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and
old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

It is disappointing that at a time when public consensus for old-growth protection and
second-growth thinning has never been stronger, the BLM is proposing to clearcut forests
older than our nation and turn complex ecosystems into tree plantations most susceptible
to severe wildfire.

Please protect remaining old-growth forests, focus active management of BLM lands in
already logged-over areas, and create job opportunities in restoration thinning projects
that benefit watersheds and generate wood products without multiplying past mistakes.

I am opposed to the designation of 13 "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" concentrating
OHV use on more than 100,000 acres in the area between Ashland, Jacksonville, Gold Hill,
Rogue River, Grants Pass and Illinois Valley.  More than half of the acreage is privately
held- not BLM land.  The plan encourages OHV usage and actively discourages other forms
of quiet type recreation .  Focusing on OHV use when all other outdoor recreation is far
greater  is a serious mistake.  I do not want more OHV use in our surrounding areas. 
This kind of activity is not appropreate for or in the best interest for the homeowners
who live within or near the boundaries and has significant negative implications for the
future of outdoor tourism for this entire area.  OHV use is polluting both to the air and
the quiet of this area and encourages the production of greenhouse emissions that further
deteriorate the environment.  I hike in these regions frequently, and OHV within miles of
where I hike could be heard and would destroy my enjoyment and that of many others hiking
in these areas.

The WOPR ignores environmental protections in the O&C Act as well as the Endangered
Species Act, the Clean Water Act and other laws put in place to protect the forests and
streams.  The WOPR puts creating more tree plantations ahead of protecting clean water,
wildlife habitat, responsible recreation or producing a reliable small diameter wood
supply.


 

Sincerely,


Ruth Lowengart, MD 8661 Wagner Creek Rd, Talent OR 97540



Senator Ron Wyden
1220 SW 3rd Ave., Suite 585, Portland, OR 97204

Senator Gordon Smith
121 SW Salmon St., Suite 1250, Portland, OR 97204

Rep. Greg Walden (R-2nd)
843 East Main Street, Ste 400, Medford, OR 97504


 
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EM-911 "M. Aulenbach" <shree.krishnaa@yahoo.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/3/2007 12:27:08 Dear BLM,
I recently read your new newsletter, #8. I am very disappointed that you are not giving our forests full protection from any more Old-Growth logging. It is quite obvious that tree plantations cannot become an Ancient Forest when continually "managed". They are pristine because no one has tampered with them, and this is exactly what we need to do to keep them alive and striving! I urge you to stop "managing" all Old-Growth forests. I would like to have the opportunity to visit these remaining groves of our original forests, again and again. Once "managed", they are gone forever...and that is not acceptable, this is death.
I also do not wish to have Off Road Vehicles tearing-up our forests and disturbing the wildlife that resides there...would you want to hear these machines cruising through your yard, and tearing-up your lawn? Not me! We need to conserver our fuel, not burn it for joy rides, thus polluting the forested areas with poisonous fumes and loud sounds.
It is time to protect all of our remaining Old-Growth Forests, so future and present generations can experience their living value.
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

M. Aulenbach
25358 Cherry Creek Road
Monroe, OR 97456
EM-912 "M. Aulenbach" <shree.krishnaa@yahoo.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/3/2007 12:28:55 Dear BLM,
I live in Oregon for a variety of reasons, including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won?t be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon?s spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

M. Aulenbach
25358 Cherry Creek Road
Monroe, OR 97456
EM-913 Sue Doolen <sue_doolen@yahoo.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/4/2007 2:56:33 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Sue Doolen
842 NE 2nd St.#12
Corvallis, OR 97330
EM-914 Forwarded by alan_hoffmeister@blm.gov Fw: Stop the Whopper Mistake or WOPR 12/4/2007 7:59:51 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 12/04/2007 07:58 AM -----

"Don Alexander" <genghis@efn.org>

12/03/2007 10:13 PM

To
<Alan_Hoffmeister@blm.gov>
cc
"Don Alexander" <genghis@efn.org>
Subject
Stop the Whopper Mistake or WOPR

Greetings, Alan;
I worked in the forests for 14 years logging and tree planting.
I hope you can forward this e-mail to the public comment arena regarding the Western Oregon Plan Revision proposal.
I am very distressed that this plan is even being discussed.
With climate change, pollution, species extinction and the growing need to conserve clean water, the idea that riparian zones will be decreased, old growth logging increased and new logging roads built is crazy!  We must look into the future and ask ourselves is clearcut logging trees older than our country for McMansions and big box stores a smart and wise move?  What we need to do to fund rural schools is increase the hotel motel room tax, consumption tax, corporate taxes and  promote conservation.  All the most reputable scientists agree if we don't deal with climate change in very measureable ways, which includes our timber industry, we will have potentially life threatening problems in the very near future for ourselves and the following generations to deal with.  A big no for this whopper of a mistake!  There are only a few places on earth with trees as big and old as the ones we have here in Oregon.
We must change the clearcut, end of the month profit margin mentality that is destroying our support system, Earth.
Donald Alexander
81394 Lost Creek Road
Dexter, Oregon 97431
541-937-3844
EM-915 "Rael Nidess, M.D." <rnidess@swbell.net> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/5/2007 10:52:07 Dear BLM,
I do not live in Oregon but support conservation for a variety of reasons, including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won?t be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon?s spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

Rael Nidess, M.D.
100 StoneCreek Drive
Apt. 239
Marshall, TX 75672-4586
EM-916 Matt Alford <mattalford@hotmail.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/5/2007 12:42:53 Dear BLM,
I am writing to tell you that I DO NOT support WOPR. As an avid backcountry elk hunter, I hike the roadless areas of the Oregon coast and I enjoy the pristine scenery of the wild outdoors as much as the hunting itself.

As Oregonians, we have already given up nearly 90% of our virgin forests to logging management practices. I am not anti-logging. Logging has its place as a forest management tool, but the remaining uncut forests need to remain that way.

Please remove Wassen Creek and other virgin forest areas from WOPR or scrap WOPR altogether.

Matt Alford
39360 SW Laurelwood Rd
Gaston, OR 97119

503-780-2596
EM-917 "Sarah Hafer" <charityh@comcast.net> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 13:52:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Sarah Hafer
1797 1/2 Columbia St
Eugene, OR 97403-1904
USA
charityh@comcast.net


EM-918 "James Helsing" <ghosthost7@juno.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 13:52:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

James Helsing
7985 Santa Monica Blvd
West Hollywood, CA 90046-5197
USA
ghosthost7@juno.com


EM-919 "roberta e. newman" <robertaellen@mac.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 13:52:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

roberta e. newman
300 monte vista ave.
mill valley, CA 94941
USA
robertaellen@mac.com


EM-920 "Rachael Denny" <stormdragon71@netscape.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:02:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. I am concerned
that the BLM's process for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and
wilderness recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known
wild places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.
Why is this?

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness, Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a grave mistake that cannot be undone once
the old growth trees have been cleared, and the land degraded. I strongly urge
BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations in the WOPR, and to expand the
recommendations to include the wild places listed above that should be managed
to maintain their wilderness characteristics. Please reconsider now, before it
is too late. These special places deserve our care and respect.

Thank you for your consideration.

Sincerely,

Rachael Denny
2680 Lynch Canyon Road
Bradley, CA 93426-9656
USA
stormdragon71@netscape.net


EM-921 "Gretchen Lambrecht" <gretlamb@yahoo.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:02:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Gretchen Lambrecht
765 E College Dr Apt 4
Durango, CO 81301-5556
USA
gretlamb@yahoo.com


EM-922 "Don Hamilton" <don.hamilton@lrwu.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:02:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Don Hamilton
221 E Capitol Ave
Little Rock, AR 72202-2413
USA
don.hamilton@lrwu.com


EM-923 "Tia Triplett" <tia@anlf.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:02:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Tia Triplett
4073 Bledsoe avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90066
USA
tia@anlf.com


EM-924 "Jared Brenner" <jgbrenner1@aol.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:02:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Jared Brenner
30 East 9th Streeet #5N
New York, NY 10003
USA
jgbrenner1@aol.com


EM-925 "Laura Herndon" <laura.herndon@disney.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:02:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Laura Herndon
222 N Buena Vista St Apt 207
Burbank, CA 91505-3682
USA
laura.herndon@disney.com


EM-926 "John Lemmon" <jlemmon@its.bldrdoc.gov> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:02:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

John Lemmon
154 Cumberland Gap Road
Nederland, CO 80466
USA
jlemmon@its.bldrdoc.gov


EM-927 "Kristin Howard" <kahowardnm@msn.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:02:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Kristin Howard
35 Clint Rd.
Taos, NM 87571
USA
kahowardnm@msn.com


EM-928 "Miriam Beth Kurland" <Mim.K@excite.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:02:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Miriam Beth Kurland
269 Wormwood Hill Rd
Mansfield Center, CT 06250-1033
USA
Mim.K@excite.com


EM-929 "Andy Tomsky" <atomsky@yahoo.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:02:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Andy Tomsky
Po Box 82673
San Diego, CA 92138
USA
atomsky@yahoo.com


EM-930 "Judith Shematek" <jshematek119@yahoo.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:02:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Judith Shematek
119 Chisman Lndg
Seaford, VA 23696-2345
USA
jshematek119@yahoo.com


EM-931 "pinky jain pan" <pinkyscout@yahoo.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:02:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

pinky jain pan
1720 W Steele Ln
Santa Rosa, CA 95403-2627
USA
pinkyscout@yahoo.com


EM-932 "darynne jessler" <darynnej@yahoo.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:02:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

darynne jessler
4408 Gentry Ave
Valley Village, CA 91607-4115
USA
darynnej@yahoo.com


EM-933 "Ann Mcmullen" <atpm@comcast.net> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:02:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Ann Mcmullen
9339 Silvercrest Dr
Sandy, UT 84093
USA
atpm@comcast.net


EM-934 "Kathleen Helmer" <kath51@sbcglobal.net> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:02:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Kathleen Helmer
23125 Dolorosa Street
Woodland Hills, CA 91367
USA
kath51@sbcglobal.net


EM-935 "Judy Stufflebeam" <jstufflebeam@whale-mail.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:02:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Judy Stufflebeam
19178 S. Echo Dell Lane
Oregon City, OR 97045
USA
jstufflebeam@whale-mail.com


EM-936 "Donlon McGovern" <mcgovern@hevanet.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:02:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Donlon McGovern
4107 NE 24th Ave
Portland, OR 97211
USA
mcgovern@hevanet.com


EM-937 "Chris Hennessey" <hennessey@league.org> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:02:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Chris Hennessey
10212 S 45Th St
Phoenix, AZ 85044
USA
hennessey@league.org


EM-938 "Adrienne Dollyhigh" <a_icequeen@excite.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:02:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Adrienne Dollyhigh
351 S Franklin Rd
Mount Airy, NC 27030-4217
USA
a_icequeen@excite.com


EM-939 "Mary Sneeringer" <mlsneeringer@hotmail.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:02:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Mary Sneeringer
12611 NE 99th St
L74
Vancouver, WA 98682
USA
mlsneeringer@hotmail.com


EM-940 "Jennifer Hunter" <jennyfresh@hotmail.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:02:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Jennifer Hunter
PO Box 32
Jewett, NY 12444
USA
jennyfresh@hotmail.com


EM-941 "Juliann Rule" <SchugRule@aol.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:02:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Juliann Rule
35002 115th Ave
Avon, MN 56310-9636
USA
SchugRule@aol.com


EM-942 "Stephen Donnelly" <tvc15ma@yahoo.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:02:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Stephen Donnelly
6 Pinebrook Drive
Easthampton, MA 01027
USA
tvc15ma@yahoo.com


EM-943 "Tom Camara" <tcnews@sonic.net> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:12:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Tom Camara
Green Glen Way
Mill Valley, CA 94941-4018
USA
tcnews@sonic.net


EM-944 "Ben Chiang" <benvegan@poloniustheatre.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:12:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.&#13;&#10;&#13;&#10;The
Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the criteria
for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild Rogue
North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.&#13;&#10;&#13;&#10;BLM's
analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance of
wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.&#13;&#10;&#13;&#10;The WOPR is a heavily forested
area, and contains rare old growth with trees that stood before our nation existed.
Many of these deserving wild lands should be recommended as wilderness to preserve
these ancient giants and the beautiful landscapes that surround them. Failure
to protect these increasingly endangered wild places from timber harvest is a
mistake that cannot be undone once the old growth trees have been cleared. I urge
BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations in the WOPR, and to expand the
recommendations to include the wild places listed above that should be managed
to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Ben Chiang
4411 Cahuenga Blvd.
#2
Toluca Lake, CA 91602-2386
USA
benvegan@poloniustheatre.com


EM-945 "Mark Reback" <mark@consumerwatchdog.org> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:12:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Mark Reback
"2820 S. Sepulveda Bl., #20"
Los Angeles, CA 90064
USA
mark@consumerwatchdog.org


EM-946 "Jeff Fromberg" <jfromberg@earthlink.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:12:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Jeff Fromberg
233 S. Barrington avenue
apt 309
Los Angeles, CA 90067
USA
jfromberg@earthlink.net


EM-947 "Jon Current" <quixotic_1@earthlink.net> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:12:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Jon Current
2323 NW 188th Ave Apt. 925
Hillsboro, OR 97124
USA
quixotic_1@earthlink.net


EM-948 "Pamela Steger" <pms_nanner@yahoo.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:12:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Pamela Steger
934 Sycamore St.
San Marcos, TX 78666
USA
pms_nanner@yahoo.com


EM-949 "Jesse Williams" <arqwing@yahoo.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:12:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Jesse Williams
3853 Meade st
Denver, CO 80211
USA
arqwing@yahoo.com


EM-950 "Kaj Dorstenia" <kaj.dorstenia@get2net.dk> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:12:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Kaj Dorstenia
Ingemannsvej 13 st.mf.d
Frb C
Copenhagen, 1964
Denmark
kaj.dorstenia@get2net.dk


EM-951 "David Hoff" <hoffline@cableone.net> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:12:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

David Hoff
4227 N. Rhodes Ave.
Meridian, ID 83646
USA
hoffline@cableone.net


EM-952 "Anne Pinkerton" <anpinkerton@vanguardschool-pa.org> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:12:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Anne Pinkerton
1308 Melvin Road
Phoenixville, PA 19460
USA
anpinkerton@vanguardschool-pa.org


EM-953 "Michael Moore" <mvmoore@ieee.org> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:12:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Michael Moore
3639 Pine Meadow Ave
Parker, CO 80138
USA
mvmoore@ieee.org


EM-954 "Del E. Domke" <delyicious@comcast.net> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:12:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Del E. Domke
16142 N.E. 15th. Street
Bellevue, WA 98008-2711
USA
delyicious@comcast.net


EM-955 "Robert von_Tobel" <rvon_tobel@hotmail.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:12:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Robert von_Tobel
2038 139th Place SE
Bellevue, WA 98005-4036
USA
rvon_tobel@hotmail.com


EM-956 "Debra Rehn" <BibleeoGirl@aol.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:12:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Debra Rehn
5130 SE 30th Ave Apt 9
Portland, OR 97202-4557
USA
BibleeoGirl@aol.com


EM-957 "Mary-Elise Sheets" <cs_social_butterfly@yahoo.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:12:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Mary-Elise Sheets
"2018 Peach Orchard Drive, #22"
#22
Falls Church, VA 22043
USA
cs_social_butterfly@yahoo.com


EM-958 "Callie Riley" <callie_riley@hotmail.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:12:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Callie Riley
8054 Oak Ave
Citrus Heights, CA 95610-2514
USA
callie_riley@hotmail.com


EM-959 "Carrie Needler" <sexycen1967@aol.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:12:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Carrie Needler
3501 N Linden St
Muncie, IN 47304-1928
USA
sexycen1967@aol.com


EM-960 "Terri Camara" <tkcamara@yahoo.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:12:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Terri Camara
12004 High Valley Dr
Dallas, TX 75234-7740
USA
tkcamara@yahoo.com


EM-961 "James Wolcott" <Jim61825@hotmail.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:12:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

James Wolcott
Old Highway 41
Evansville, IN 47711
USA
Jim61825@hotmail.com


EM-962 "William Gupton" <wmgupton@aol.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:12:03 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

William Gupton
6725 Morganford Rd
Charlotte, NC 28211-5406
USA
wmgupton@aol.com


EM-963 "branwen gregory" <pg@econres.com> branwen 12/5/2007 14:12:03 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

branwen gregory
1766 Las Palmas
LA
LA, CA 90028
USA
pg@econres.com


EM-964 "Michael Quinn" <mikepq@yahoo.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:12:03 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Michael Quinn
207 N. victory Blvd.
Burbank, CA 91502
USA
mikepq@yahoo.com


EM-965 "Cathy Gage" <ralphandcathy@sympatico.ca> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:12:03 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

This issue is very important to me!

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Cathy Gage
95 Renfield Street
Guelph, ON N1E 4A5
Canada
ralphandcathy@sympatico.ca


EM-966 "Margaret novitski" <pegnovitski@yahoo.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:12:03 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Margaret novitski
1208 E. Preston
Mt. Pleasant, MI 48858
USA
pegnovitski@yahoo.com


EM-967 "JC Corcoran" <vegaia@juno.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:12:03 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

JC Corcoran
165 Oakridge
Athens, GA 30601
USA
vegaia@juno.com


EM-968 "Stefanie Gandolfi" <stef.gandolfi@sbcglobal.net> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:12:03 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Stefanie Gandolfi
81 Donna Way
Oakland, CA 94605-5037
USA
stef.gandolfi@sbcglobal.net


EM-969 "william knerr" <hortknerr@yahoo.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:12:03 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

william knerr
400 nevada st.
san francisco, CA 94110
USA
hortknerr@yahoo.com


EM-970 "Warren G. Jones" <Golfpro1921@aol.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:12:03 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Warren G. Jones
911 Maple Ave
Grafton, WV 26354-1827
USA
Golfpro1921@aol.com


EM-971 "Bernard Wolf" <bwolf63@yahoo.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:12:03 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Bernard Wolf
3412 W Hayward Pl
Denver, CO 80211-3626
USA
bwolf63@yahoo.com


EM-972 "bob johnston" <bison1bob@aol.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:12:03 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

bob johnston
po box 1126
cooke city, MT 59020
USA
bison1bob@aol.com


EM-973 "Emily Lancaster" <emmylanky@gmail.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:12:03 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

Please take the time to regard my concerns!

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Emily Lancaster
95 Renfield St.
Guelph, ON N1E 4A5
Canada
emmylanky@gmail.com


EM-974 "A.E. White" <aw95@comcast.net> More areas merit wilderness recommendations!!! 12/5/2007 14:22:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to POLITELY DEMAND for a reevaluation and expansion of the areas
that ARE TO BE IMMEDIATELY recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan
Revision (WOPR). The Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends
only five areas, despite a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed
by the plan. The BLM's process for evaluating and determining wilderness resources
and wilderness recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known
wild places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

A.E. White
2330 - 43rd ave east
seattle, WA 98112
USA
aw95@comcast.net


EM-975 "Kenneth Mondal" <kmondal@rockwoodclinic.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:22:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Kenneth Mondal
2088 S Parkwood Cir
Spokane, WA 99223
USA
kmondal@rockwoodclinic.com


EM-976 "Frank Baylin" <frank@baylin.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:22:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Frank Baylin
1905 Mariposa Ave
Boulder, CO 80302-7932
USA
frank@baylin.com


EM-977 "John Sefton" <johnjuly@yahoo.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:22:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

John Sefton
PO Box 714
20462 Rose Canyon Rd
Trabuco Canyon, CA 92678
USA
johnjuly@yahoo.com


EM-978 "Sharon Buazard" <shabuz1010@yahoo.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:22:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Sharon Buazard
3108 7th St
Rockford, IL 61109-2161
USA
shabuz1010@yahoo.com


EM-979 "Kelly Riley" <khanlon74@yahoo.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:22:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Kelly Riley
615 Hill Church Rd
Hummelstown, PA 17036-8558
USA
khanlon74@yahoo.com


EM-980 "Lawrence Fosnick-Davis" <adiosmuchachos@hotmail.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:22:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Lawrence Fosnick-Davis
6749 12th Ave NW
Seattle, WA 98117
USA
adiosmuchachos@hotmail.com


EM-981 "Carmen Klucsor" <cklucsor@telik.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:22:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Carmen Klucsor
663 East McKinley Avenue
Sunnyvale, CA 94086-6451
USA
cklucsor@telik.com


EM-982 "Judy McAuley" <iris5426@yahoo.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:22:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Judy McAuley
740 Taylor Ave
Pittsburgh, PA 15202
USA
iris5426@yahoo.com


EM-983 "Janet Holstine" <JKHolstine@aol.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:32:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Janet Holstine
10466 Tomkinson Dr
Scotts, MI 49088-8765
USA
JKHolstine@aol.com


EM-984 "Patricia A. Carter" <pacarter47@yahoo.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:32:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Patricia A. Carter
3143 Pestalozzi St
Saint Louis, MO 63118-1269
USA
pacarter47@yahoo.com


EM-985 "Chris Keefe" <ckeefe@airtest.net> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:32:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Chris Keefe
2420 S. Meade St.
Denver, CO 80219
USA
ckeefe@airtest.net


EM-986 "Jeannie Shawler" <bdashawler@northrock.bm> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:32:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Jeannie Shawler
#45Mayflower Ct.7Woodbourne Ave.
Hamilton, HM-08
Bermuda
bdashawler@northrock.bm


EM-987 "Jennifer Nitz" <grizzalo@hotmail.com> Wilderness designation in Oregon 12/5/2007 14:32:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Jennifer Nitz
802 E Front
Missoula, MT 59802
USA
grizzalo@hotmail.com


EM-988 "Rayline Dean" <RaylineLDean@msn.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:32:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Rayline Dean
421 N. Alvord St.
Ridgecrest, CA 93555-3622
USA
RaylineLDean@msn.com


EM-989 "Albert Honican" <Alhonican@msn.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:32:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Albert Honican
316 Lakeview Lane S.E.
same
Winter Haven, FL 33884
USA
Alhonican@msn.com


EM-990 "Christina Babst" <seamusminnie@hotmail.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:32:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Christina Babst
728 N. Doheny Drive
W. Hollywood, CA 90069-5525
USA
seamusminnie@hotmail.com


EM-991 "Joseph Cox" <scott.cox@soletechnology.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:32:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Joseph Cox
25885 Trabuco Rd. #242
Lake Forest, CA 92630
USA
scott.cox@soletechnology.com


EM-992 "Neil Stahl" <nstahl@escapees.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:32:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Neil Stahl
459 Melanie Ct
Chapel Hill, NC 27514-1836
USA
nstahl@escapees.com


EM-993 "Linda Schermer" <lschermer@yahoo.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:32:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I urge you to reevaluate and expand areas that should be recommended as wilderness
in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau of Land Management's (BLM)
preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite a total of 146 inventoried
areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process for evaluating and determining
wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate,
resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics
being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Linda Schermer
500 Mtn Lilac Dr
Sedona, AZ 86336
USA
lschermer@yahoo.com


EM-994 "Dimitri Gogin" <dgogin@socal.rr.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:32:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Dimitri Gogin
23318 Susana Avenue
Torrance, CA 90505
USA
dgogin@socal.rr.com


EM-995 "Melissa Hannan" <melissa.hannan@comcast.net> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:32:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Melissa Hannan
12133 Manor Park Dr
Glen Allen, VA 23059-5463
USA
melissa.hannan@comcast.net


EM-996 "Nancy Alexander" <smiles989@msn.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:42:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Nancy Alexander
9725 Greenmeadow Circle
Glen Allen, VA 23060-3569
USA
smiles989@msn.com


EM-997 "Barbara Bartel" <peacemealgarden@msn.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:42:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Barbara Bartel
38200 SE Coupland
Peace Meal Garden
Estacada, OR 97023-7516
USA
peacemealgarden@msn.com


EM-998 "Charles Dickens, Phd." <cdickens007@comcast.net> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:42:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Charles Dickens, Phd.
710 EMILY DRIVE
Goodlettsville, TN 37072
USA
cdickens007@comcast.net


EM-999 "Rayline Dean" <RaylineDean@webtv.net> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:42:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Rayline Dean
421 N. Alvord St.
Ridgecrest, CA 93555
USA
RaylineDean@webtv.net


EM-1000 "Eric Probola" <ratmachine1@hotmail.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:42:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Eric Probola
112 Fairview Avenue
East Pittsburgh, PA 15112
USA
ratmachine1@hotmail.com


EM-1001 "Marjorie Streeter" <streetmm@mindspring.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:42:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Marjorie Streeter
2320 Emerald Heights Court
Reston, VA 20191-1745
USA
streetmm@mindspring.com


EM-1002 "Joanna Kelly" <joannackelly@yahoo.com> Western Oregon Plan Revision 12/5/2007 14:42:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Joanna Kelly
1154 N. Poinsettia Pl.
apt.5
West Hollywood, CA 90046
USA
joannackelly@yahoo.com


EM-1003 "Patricia Clements" <patsijean@comcast.net> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:42:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Patricia Clements
710 EMILY DRIVE
Goodlettsville, TN 37072
USA
patsijean@comcast.net


EM-1004 "Georgia Mattingly" <glmattingly@earthlink.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:42:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Georgia Mattingly
412 Verdant Circle
Longmont, CO 80501-3908
USA
glmattingly@earthlink.net


EM-1005 "Annette Bork" <annettebork@cox.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:42:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I urge you to reevaluate and expand the areas to recommend as wilderness in
the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau of Land Management's (BLM)
preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite a total of 146 inventoried
areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process for evaluating and determining
wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate,
resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics
being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Annette Bork
4505 Sandburg Way
Irvine, CA 92612-2739
USA
annettebork@cox.net


EM-1006 "Donna Clark" <key4skip@sbcglobal.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:42:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Donna Clark
2220 Westmont Dr
Alhambra, CA 91803
USA
key4skip@sbcglobal.net


EM-1007 "Wendy Morris" <wendy.morris@phs.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:42:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Wendy Morris
219 W. Campbell Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85013
USA
wendy.morris@phs.com


EM-1008 "Joseph O'Sullivan" <josullivan58@hotmail.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:42:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Joseph O'Sullivan
108 West 45th Street
Apt 107
Austin, TX 78751
USA
josullivan58@hotmail.com


EM-1009 "Andrea Valenzuela" <cntslnts@yahoo.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:42:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Andrea Valenzuela
345 Millitary East
Benicia, CA 94510
USA
cntslnts@yahoo.com


EM-1010 "Sandy Hornfeck" <sandy@ctaz.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:42:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Sandy Hornfeck
4025 Calle Del Media
Fort Mohave Mesa, AZ 86426
USA
sandy@ctaz.com


EM-1011 "Anthony Montapert" <amontapert@roadrunner.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:42:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Anthony Montapert
11160 Valley Spring Place
North Hollywood, CA 91602
USA
amontapert@roadrunner.com


EM-1012 "Chris Specht" <cspechtrock@aol.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:42:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

This is important. I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the
areas that should be recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision
(WOPR). The Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends
only five areas, despite a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed
by the plan. The BLM's process for evaluating and determining wilderness resources
and wilderness recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known
wild places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Chris Specht
please send no post
Sherman Oaks, CA 91403
USA
cspechtrock@aol.com


EM-1013 "Robert Anger" <robert.anger@fox.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:42:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Robert Anger
929 Idaho Avenue # 7
Santa Monica, CA 90403
USA
robert.anger@fox.com


EM-1014 "CATHIE SCHNEIDER" <ozarkotter@yahoo.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:42:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

CATHIE SCHNEIDER
HC 3 Box 3370
Tecumseh, MO 65760-9503
USA
ozarkotter@yahoo.com


EM-1015 "Patricia Snowden" <postscript2@comcast.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:42:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Patricia Snowden
5145 Westbard Ave.
Bethesda, MD 20816-1413
USA
postscript2@comcast.net


EM-1016 "Samantha Adams" <sca_adams@yahoo.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:42:03 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Samantha Adams
2920 Clairemont Dr
San Diego, CA 92117-6716
USA
sca_adams@yahoo.com


EM-1017 "Roger Santerre" <rsanterre@hvc.rr.con> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:42:03 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Roger Santerre
10 Canaan Rd.
New Paltz, NY 12561
USA
rsanterre@hvc.rr.con


EM-1018 "Donna Bonetti" <donnambirdlady@yahoo.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:52:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Donna Bonetti
1170 B Monroe Dr
Boulder, CO 80303
USA
donnambirdlady@yahoo.com


EM-1019 "Robert Kalovsky" <bolenbeck@charter.net> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:52:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Robert Kalovsky
W8333 North Shore Drive
Onalasdka, WI 54650
USA
bolenbeck@charter.net


EM-1020 "John McCarron" <mccarronjack@yahoo.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:52:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

John McCarron
229 Dory Dr
Ocean City, NJ 08226-1117
USA
mccarronjack@yahoo.com


EM-1021 "Georgia Braithwaite" <georgiabraithwaite@yahoo.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:52:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Georgia Braithwaite
2145 Hogan Ln
Cottonwood, AZ 86326
USA
georgiabraithwaite@yahoo.com


EM-1022 "Wayne Steffes" <camerashy@shasta.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:52:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Wayne Steffes
2187 Wisconsin Ave
Redding, CA 96001-2906
USA
camerashy@shasta.com


EM-1023 "Pam Diliberto" <pdiliberto@nc.rr.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:52:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Pam Diliberto
6 Gorham Pl
Durham, NC 27705-6120
USA
pdiliberto@nc.rr.com


EM-1024 "Ruthann Roka" <sunshine648@juno.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 14:52:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Ruthann Roka
648 Circlewood Dr
Venice, FL 34293-7022
USA
sunshine648@juno.com


EM-1025 "Theresa Everett" <xenrenfan@aol.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:52:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Theresa Everett
500 High Cliffe Lane
Tarrytown, NY 10591
USA
xenrenfan@aol.com


EM-1026 "Pat Pascual" <peapat36@hotmail.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:52:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Pat Pascual
1216 Route 311
Patterson, NY 12563-2823
USA
peapat36@hotmail.com


EM-1027 "Tamara Friedler" <tfluvsuva@hotmail.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 14:52:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Tamara Friedler
4905 Tarheel Way
Annandale, VA 22003
USA
tfluvsuva@hotmail.com


EM-1028 "Paul Bonsaint" <pjhair48@verizon.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 14:52:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Paul Bonsaint
16 Middle St
Brunswick, ME 04011-2406
USA
pjhair48@verizon.net


EM-1029 "Robert Stuart" <bsmd@uhs.berkeley.edu> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 15:02:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Robert Stuart
13149 Clairepointe Way
Oakland, CA 94619
USA
bsmd@uhs.berkeley.edu


EM-1030 "Deborah Bradford" <dbradfor@du.edu> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 15:02:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Deborah Bradford
2358 So. High St.
Denver, DE 80210
USA
dbradfor@du.edu


EM-1031 "Sergio Monteiro" <monteiroserge@yahoo.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 15:02:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

This letter is about the environment in general, and our forests and wilderness
areas in particular.

I went to school in Washington state, and am personally acquainted with major
parts of the state of Oregon. Based on my personal experience I urge you to
reevaluate and expand the areas that should be recommended as wilderness in the
Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) preferred
alternative recommends only five areas, despite a total of 146 inventoried areas
in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process for evaluating and determining
wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate,
resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics
being improperly omitted.

Again, based on my personal experience, the Wild Rogue Additions is a prime
example of an area that clearly meets the criteria for wilderness recommendation,
and yet was not recommended. In the Wild Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM
itself noted the value of the large, roadless areas for aesthetics, solitude,
undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife, fisheries, water quality, and
the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped places (see Version 2.0 of this
analysis, issued in December 1999 and available online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

It is my opinion that BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account
the economic importance of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of
the public lands it stewards, instead of considering lands primarily for their
timber values. This approach demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the
BLM's legal obligations, and must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be
recommended for wilderness protection include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild
Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull
of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Sergio Monteiro
1325 Wellesley Ave. # 209
Los Angeles, CA 90025-2049
USA
monteiroserge@yahoo.com


EM-1032 "Charles Williams" <Stormmoon@aol.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 15:02:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Charles Williams
2285 Oakway Terrace
Eugen, OR 97401
USA
Stormmoon@aol.com


EM-1033 "Kim Johnson" <kej_48195@yahoo.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 15:02:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Kim Johnson
468 Kings Hwy
Wyandotte, MI 48192-2410
USA
kej_48195@yahoo.com


EM-1034 "Larry Folston" <ltfolston@bendbroadband.com> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision 12/5/2007 15:10:14 Larry Folston
801 NW Poplar Ave
Redmond, OR 97756-1060


December 5, 2007

Edward Shepard
OR/WA State Director
Bureau of Land Management
PO Box 2965
Portland, OR 97208


Dear Edward Shepard:

Please accept the following comments on the BLM's Draft Environmental
Impact Statement for the Revision of the Resource Management Plans for
Western Oregon.

None of the three alternatives presented in the DEIS meet the requirements
of the O&C Act because they do not manage the land for the dominant use of
timber production. Reserving the majority (52%) of the suitable
timberlands for the purpose of a listed species is contrary to the O&C Act.

The BLM must develop and analyzes at least one alternative that maximizes
the amount of land in timber production and receipts to local county
governments, and meets its no jeopardy obligation.




Congress and the Administration must ensure that when the Plan is
finalized that the BLM receives adequate funding so that it can be fully
implemented.

When implemented, the Plan should live up to the full commitment that was
made to local counties.

Timber sale revenues must generate at least an amount equal to the funding
that was provided to local counties through the Secure Rural Schools and
Community Self-Determination Act on a yearly basis.

All BLM administered land should be managed to minimize the threat of
catastrophic wildfire on these lands and surrounding state and private
lands.

Access should be maintained through BLM administered lands for private
land access, fire suppression, as well as recreational uses, such as
hunting, fishing, boating and sightseeing.

I support a modified Alternative 2 Plus to meet the funding needs of local
counties, provide neede timber supply, and improve forest health while
also protecting the environment.

In summary, the economic viability of our rural communities and the
overall health of our federal forests are of vital importance to me. I
ask that you give these comments full consideration as you prepare the
final Environmental Impact Statement and select the final management plans
for the Western Oregon BLM Districts.

Sincerely,


Larry T. Folston
5415487852

EM-1035 "antony mazzotta" <amazzot@yahoo.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 15:12:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

antony mazzotta
waterloo st.
los Angeles, CA 90026
USA
amazzot@yahoo.com


EM-1036 "Michael Prete" <michaelprete@cox.net> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 15:12:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Michael Prete
1515 E Edison St
Tucson, AZ 85719-3609
USA
michaelprete@cox.net


EM-1037 "Erin DeCecco" <erindececco@hotmail.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 15:12:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Erin DeCecco
1908 South Tremont
Oceanside, CA 92054
USA
erindececco@hotmail.com


EM-1038 "Ann Rice" <alrice_2000@yahoo.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 15:12:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Ann Rice
37734 Second Street
Fremont, CA 94536
USA
alrice_2000@yahoo.com


EM-1039 "Mike Tomlinson" <mt_trout@hotmail.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 15:12:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Mike Tomlinson
2776 18th St
Sacramento, CA 95818-3006
USA
mt_trout@hotmail.com


EM-1040 "Dana Wullenwaber" <odonata22@sbcglobal.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 15:12:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Dana Wullenwaber
2442 California St
Redding, CA 96001-2609
USA
odonata22@sbcglobal.net


EM-1041 "Martha Larsen" <martha_larsen@yahoo.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 15:12:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Martha Larsen
801 Bromley Rd
Charlotte, NC 28207-1611
USA
martha_larsen@yahoo.com


EM-1042 "Diane Shaughnessy" <DShau2@aol.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 15:12:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Diane Shaughnessy
1528 22nd St NE
Auburn, WA 98002-3439
USA
DShau2@aol.com


EM-1043 "Joan Mitchell" <joan_mitchell@yahoo.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 15:12:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Joan Mitchell
711 Bear Rd
Bushkill, PA 18324
USA
joan_mitchell@yahoo.com


EM-1044 "Andrew Genson" <gendor23@juno.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 15:12:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Andrew Genson
10416 Paso Fino S.W.
Albuquerque, NM 87121-8955
USA
gendor23@juno.com


EM-1045 "lynn noe" <lyda027@yahoo.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 15:12:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

lynn noe
28065 radford dr
sun city, CA 92586
USA
lyda027@yahoo.com


EM-1046 "Patricia Webber" <ebye292540@aol.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 15:12:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Patricia Webber
1820 Avenida del Mundo 1404
Coronado, CA 92118-4038
USA
ebye292540@aol.com


EM-1047 "Soraya Hejazi" <soraya_hejazi@hotmail.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 15:12:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Soraya Hejazi
17171 Roscoe Blvd.
Northridge, CA 91325
USA
soraya_hejazi@hotmail.com


EM-1048 "Theresa Ciavarella" <tciavarella02@yahoo.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 15:12:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Theresa Ciavarella
1419 Adams Avenue
Altoona, PA 16602
USA
tciavarella02@yahoo.com


EM-1049 "Eleanor Brennan" <kbrenna1@san.rr.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 15:12:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Eleanor Brennan
9403 Aldabra Ct
San Diego, CA 92129
USA
kbrenna1@san.rr.com


EM-1050 "Billie He" <puppylover378@hotmail.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 15:22:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management�s (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas,
despite a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The
BLM�s process for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness
recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild
places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM�s analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM�s legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness � Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and
Coast Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Billie He
Almansor Rd.
Alhambra, CA 91801-5504
USA
puppylover378@hotmail.com


EM-1051 "Joselyn Bartlett" <jbart@mcn.org> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 15:22:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Joselyn Bartlett
44002 Fern Creek Rd. #49
Caspar, CA 95420
USA
jbart@mcn.org


EM-1052 "Sally Stewart" <stewart_sally@hotmail.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 15:22:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Sally Stewart
93720 Shutters Landing Ln
North Bend, OR 97459-8706
USA
stewart_sally@hotmail.com


EM-1053 "Charlene Root" <firebyrd@earthlink.net> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 15:22:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Charlene Root
8634 Friends Ave
Whittier, CA 90602-3321
USA
firebyrd@earthlink.net


EM-1054 "inda evans" <dindamcp4@yahoo.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 15:22:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness ?Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

inda evans
PO Box 178695
San Diego, CA 92177-8695
USA
dindamcp4@yahoo.com


EM-1055 "David T. Howenstein" <jambodave2003@ybb.ne.jp> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 15:22:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness EBull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

David T. Howenstein
723 Havenwood Circle Dr
Saint Louis, MO 63122-1424
USA
jambodave2003@ybb.ne.jp


EM-1056 "Debra Saude" <deanndeb@centurytel.net> Saude 12/5/2007 15:22:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing today to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should
be recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Debra Saude
1050 Pleasant Valley Road
pleasant Valley Rd
Sweet Home, OR 97386-1033
USA
deanndeb@centurytel.net


EM-1057 "Carol Thompson" <mcact@comcast.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 15:22:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Carol Thompson
2874 Amy Drive
South Park, PA 15129-8955
USA
mcact@comcast.net


EM-1058 "Doug Shohan" <godmetal@aol.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 15:22:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Doug Shohan
95 Via Maria
Lee, MA 01238-9354
USA
godmetal@aol.com


EM-1059 "Doug Lenier" <dlpmusic@roadrunner.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 15:22:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Doug Lenier
5720 Costello Ave
Van Nuys, CA 91401-4328
USA
dlpmusic@roadrunner.com


EM-1060 "Jo Oliver" <jorono@olypen.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 15:32:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Jo Oliver
104 Waldo Rd
Sequim, WA 98382-9232
USA
jorono@olypen.com


EM-1061 "William Huggins" <feerlessw@cox.net> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 15:32:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

William Huggins
430 Salzburg Ave
Las Vegas, NV 89123
USA
feerlessw@cox.net


EM-1062 "William Erlenbach" <bornfree33@cox.net> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 15:32:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

William Erlenbach
PO Box 8118
Surprise, AZ 85374-0118
USA
bornfree33@cox.net


EM-1063 "Greg Gille" <g.gille@comcast.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 15:32:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing TO STRONGLY URGE. . .
a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be recommended as wilderness
in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau of Land Management's (BLM)
preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite a total of 146 inventoried
areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process for evaluating and determining
wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate,
resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics
being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Greg Gille
16802 NE 6th Place
Bellevue, WA 98008
USA
g.gille@comcast.net


EM-1064 "Patty Bonney" <pattybonney@hotmail.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 15:42:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Patty Bonney
8625 SW Oleson Rd
Portland, OR 97223-6828
USA
pattybonney@hotmail.com


EM-1065 "Rebecca Long" <rivka62@hotmail.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 15:42:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Rebecca Long
61 May Ave.
P.O. Box 353
Chauncey, OH 45719
USA
rivka62@hotmail.com


EM-1066 "Asha Sidhu" <lostarts@cox.net> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 15:42:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Asha Sidhu
1604 Monroe Avenue
San Diego, CA 92116-3935
USA
lostarts@cox.net


EM-1067 "Thomas Brenner" <voohoo@aol.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 15:42:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Thomas Brenner
512 Bella St.
Hollidaysburg, PA 16648
USA
voohoo@aol.com


EM-1068 "Sharon Shadbolt" <shashatuwa@msn.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 15:42:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Sharon Shadbolt
P.O. Box 444
Tahuya, WA 98588
USA
shashatuwa@msn.com


EM-1069 "Melinda Weisser-Lee" <kenmindy@aol.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 15:42:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Melinda Weisser-Lee
3864 W Kimball St
Thatcher, AZ 85552-5112
USA
kenmindy@aol.com


EM-1070 "Jillian Forschner" <jillian234@aol.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 15:42:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Jillian Forschner
1268 Layton Road
APT E
Clarks Summit, PA 18411
USA
jillian234@aol.com


EM-1071 "MIKE CLIPKA" <mcphotos@juno.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 15:52:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

MIKE CLIPKA
1151 Sherrie Ct
Lathrop, CA 95330-9337
USA
mcphotos@juno.com


EM-1072 "Dena Pacitti" <denajp@juno.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 15:52:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Dena Pacitti
12913 Mccune Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90066
USA
denajp@juno.com


EM-1073 "Fred Sokolow" <sokolowmus@aol.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 15:52:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Fred Sokolow
1817 Hill St.
Santa Monica, CA 90405
USA
sokolowmus@aol.com


EM-1074 "Kathy Gibbs" <gibbsk@frontiernet.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 15:52:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Kathy Gibbs
473 Bluejay Drive
SPRING CREEK, NV 89815-7224
USA
gibbsk@frontiernet.net


EM-1075 "Christopher Kunkel" <ckunkel2000@yahoo.com> Please, More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 15:52:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Christopher Kunkel
349 Glen Park Lane
Midlothian, VA 23114
USA
ckunkel2000@yahoo.com


EM-1076 "Guy Zahller" <gop.r.war.criminals@gmail.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 15:52:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Guy Zahller
"146 Creek Drive, #C"
Aptos, CA 95003
USA
gop.r.war.criminals@gmail.com


EM-1077 "Todd Sargent" <tcsargent@comcast.net> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 15:52:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Todd Sargent
4035 SE Reedway
Portland, OR 97202
USA
tcsargent@comcast.net


EM-1078 "Melissa Lemke" <mmmlemke@yahoo.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 15:52:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Melissa Lemke
533 Glen St
Glens Falls, NY 12801-2206
USA
mmmlemke@yahoo.com


EM-1079 "keith kleber" <kekleb@aol.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 15:52:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

keith kleber
8945 N Scenic Dr
Tucson, AZ 85743-8787
USA
kekleb@aol.com


EM-1080 "jo wiest" <gojojorn@aol.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 15:52:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

jo wiest
16558 Carriage View Ct
Grover, MO 63040-1403
USA
gojojorn@aol.com


EM-1081 "Joanna Bettmann" <jbettmann@yahoo.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 15:52:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Joanna Bettmann
PO Box 750303
Torrey, UT 84775-0303
USA
jbettmann@yahoo.com


EM-1082 "John Steiner" <taochaitsung@hotmail.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 15:52:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

John Steiner
1107 w. 4800 s.
Taylorsville, UT 84123-4433
USA
taochaitsung@hotmail.com


EM-1083 Doug Butler <dbutler2@stny.rr.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/5/2007 15:52:30 Dear BLM,
I live in Oregon for a variety of reasons, including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won?t be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon?s spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

Doug Butler
25 Katie Lane
Painted Post, NY 14870
EM-1084 "kerry burkhardt" <muddydog69@hotmail.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 16:02:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

kerry burkhardt
3737 83rd st.
apt. 31
Jackson Heights, NY 11372-7130
USA
muddydog69@hotmail.com


EM-1085 "Gunn Honican" <Gunnhonican@aol.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 16:02:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Gunn Honican
316 Lakeview Lane S.E.
same
Winter Haven, FL 33884
USA
Gunnhonican@aol.com


EM-1086 "Nathan Wells" <nwells@mdanderson.org> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 16:02:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Nathan Wells
15635 Fox Springs Drive
Houston, TX 77084
USA
nwells@mdanderson.org


EM-1087 "Barbara Gladfelter" <bbgladfelter@yahoo.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 16:02:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Barbara Gladfelter
225 Archer Place
Dixon, CA 95620
USA
bbgladfelter@yahoo.com


EM-1088 "david h jones" <dhj47@comcast.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 16:02:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

david h jones
4007 densmore ave n
seattle, WA 98103
USA
dhj47@comcast.net


EM-1089 "Lauren Devine" <lrdevine@yahoo.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 16:02:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Lauren Devine
1377 Walnut Ter
Boca Raton, FL 33486-6909
USA
lrdevine@yahoo.com


EM-1090 "Rosemarie Overstreet" <reoverstreet@t-online.de> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 16:02:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Rosemarie Overstreet
8803 El Rico Dr
Indianapolis, IN 46240-2022
USA
reoverstreet@t-online.de


EM-1091 "Christina Gottesfeld" <christinagottesfeld@hotmail.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 16:02:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Christina Gottesfeld
P.O. Box 607
Trumbauersville, PA 18970
USA
christinagottesfeld@hotmail.com


EM-1092 "Michael Souza" <thylacinus@hotmail.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 16:02:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Michael Souza
3065 A St Apt 1
San Diego, CA 92102-1779
USA
thylacinus@hotmail.com


EM-1093 "June Jaye Logie" <junejayelogie@hotmail.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 16:12:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

June Jaye Logie
6740 Pansy Dr
Miramar, FL 33023-4863
USA
junejayelogie@hotmail.com


EM-1094 "Lee & Charlotte Terbot" <TurboTurtle@indco.net> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 16:12:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Lee & Charlotte Terbot
327 Curia Creek Lane
Cave City, AR 72521
USA
TurboTurtle@indco.net


EM-1095 "Judy Faraklas" <JFARAKLAS@COMCAST.NET> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 16:12:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Judy Faraklas
105 Bill of Rights Way
Downingtown, PA 19335
USA
JFARAKLAS@COMCAST.NET


EM-1096 "Joanna Behrens" <jobehrens@hotmail.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 16:12:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Joanna Behrens
PO Box 2514
Jackson, WY 83001-2514
USA
jobehrens@hotmail.com


EM-1097 "David M Pope" <flpdmp@att.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 16:12:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

David M Pope
16 Woodbridge Dr
Colorado Springs, CO 80906-4401
USA
flpdmp@att.net


EM-1098 "Michael S. Smith" <Michael_S_Smith_poltics@yahoo.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 16:12:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Michael S. Smith
115 Windsor Way
Berkeley Heights, NJ 07922
USA
Michael_S_Smith_poltics@yahoo.com


EM-1099 "William Babcock" <wa4lrm@pacbell.net> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 16:12:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

William Babcock
1951 47th Street SPC # 108
San Diego, CA 92102-1302
USA
wa4lrm@pacbell.net


EM-1100 "Randy Tashjian" <envirohero@hotmail.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 16:12:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Randy Tashjian
1031 Trafalgar Drive
Glendale, CA 91207
USA
envirohero@hotmail.com


EM-1101 "Mary Rausch" <maryr425@aol.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 16:22:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Mary Rausch
15201 Admiralty Way C-7
Lynnwood, WA 98087-2437
USA
maryr425@aol.com


EM-1102 "Heather Rider" <riderfit@aol.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 16:32:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Heather Rider
2424 Colorado Ave
Barrington, CA 90049
USA
riderfit@aol.com


EM-1103 "Betty Van Wicklen" <g10121@yahoo.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 16:32:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Betty Van Wicklen
41 Lakeshore Dr Apt 2B
Watervliet, NY 12189-2915
USA
g10121@yahoo.com


EM-1104 "Benton Elliott" <b.elliott@juno.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 16:32:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

The BLM must change to meet the needs of our current times. That change needs
to be from a resource extraction enabler to a protector of our forest heritage.
Failure to recognize the new paradigm will doom the agency.

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Benton Elliott
1313 Lincoln St Apt 605
Eugene, OR 97401-3895
USA
b.elliott@juno.com


EM-1105 "SUE GIVENS-HARTMAN" <sgoofy1@juno.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 16:32:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

SUE GIVENS-HARTMAN
5621 19th Ave S
Gulfport, FL 33707-4128
USA
sgoofy1@juno.com


EM-1106 "Robert Myers" <jrr@dfn.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/5/2007 16:32:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Robert Myers
5210 N. Eisenhower
Roswell, NM 88201-8603
USA
jrr@dfn.com


EM-1107 "Joe Toigo" <otterfalls@frontiernet.net> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 16:32:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Joe Toigo
2309 W Delmar Ave
Godfrey, IL 62035-1358
USA
otterfalls@frontiernet.net


EM-1108 "Kelly Garbato" <kelly.garbato@gmail.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 16:32:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management�s (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas,
despite a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The
BLM�s process for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness
recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild
places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM�s analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM�s legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness � Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and
Coast Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Kelly Garbato
19400 Mission Rd
Stilwell, KS 66085-9117
USA
kelly.garbato@gmail.com


EM-1109 "Ernest J. Scholz" <slowedpostal@Yahoo.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 16:32:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Ernest J. Scholz
1175 Chestnutst#101
San Francisco, CA 94109
USA
slowedpostal@Yahoo.com


EM-1110 "Ronald Bogin" <bogin@sbcglobal.net> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 16:32:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Ronald Bogin
2605 Edwards Ave
El Cerrito, CA 94530
USA
bogin@sbcglobal.net


EM-1111 "Mollie F Mathes" <mathes77@msn.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 16:32:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Mollie F Mathes
27080 Blue Hill Dr
Sun City, CA 92586
USA
mathes77@msn.com


EM-1112 "Laura Hewitt" <lredhawk7@entermail.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/5/2007 16:32:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Laura Hewitt
45 E. School Street
Hatfield, PA 19440
USA
lredhawk7@entermail.net


EM-1113 "Louise Brown" <louisebb@earthlink.net> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 16:32:02 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I strongly urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness
recommendations in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the
wild places listed above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Louise Brown
533 East 87th Street, #3W
New York, NY 10128-7625
USA
louisebb@earthlink.net


EM-1114 "Michael Franks" <mikefvernon@aol.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/5/2007 16:42:01 December 05, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly