E-Mail-1600-1999

# Sender Subject Date Body
EM-1600 "mark rush" <compajazz@yahoo.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/7/2007 23:52:01 December 07, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

mark rush
9020 e. nassau ave.
denver, CO 80237
USA
compajazz@yahoo.com


EM-1601 Anita Hohl <simply_ks_amethyst@yahoo.com> Protect BLM Forests 12/8/2007 4:37:58 Bureau of Land Management
Oregon/Washington State Office
ATTN: Western Oregon Planning Revision (OR930.1)
PO Box 2965
Portland, Oregon 97208

Dear BLM,

Please accept these comments on the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am a citizen concerned with the management of these lands.

For the last ten years, the Bureau of Land Management administered forests in western Oregon under the Northwest Forest Plan. This ensured these forests continued to provide important public values. These forests can also provide jobs and wood products as a by-product of forest restoration such as thinning young plantation forests.

I am concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating may lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy. Many of these forests are currently protected for water quality, salmon and wildlife concerns.

Much of the BLM forests in western Oregon are adjacent to private landowners who would like to see nearby forest managed to protect their home from wildfire and to preserve their water supply, scenery, and recreation opportunities.

Please continue to protect the western BLM forests that are now protected.

Sincerely,

Anita Hohl
415 E. FLorida, Box J-2
Greensburg, KS 67054
EM-1602 Jonathan Levy <cleotl@aol.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/8/2007 4:39:55 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Jonathan Levy
29437 Gimpl Hill Rd
Eugene, OR 97402
EM-1603 Paul Smith <pjs@indiana.edu> Protect BLM Forests 12/8/2007 4:46:18 Bureau of Land Management
Oregon/Washington State Office
ATTN: Western Oregon Planning Revision (OR930.1)
PO Box 2965
Portland, Oregon 97208

Dear BLM,


Please accept these comments on the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am a citizen from the Midwest concerned with the management of these lands.

For the last ten years, the Bureau of Land Management administered forests in western Oregon under the Northwest Forest Plan. This ensured these forests continued to provide important public values. These forests can also provide jobs and wood products as a by-product of forest restoration such as thinning young plantation forests.

I am concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating may lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy. Many of these forests are currently protected for water quality, salmon and wildlife concerns.

Much of the BLM forests in western Oregon are adjacent to private landowners who would like to see nearby forest managed to protect their home from wildfire and to preserve their water supply, scenery, and recreation opportunities.

Please continue to protect the western BLM forests that are now protected.

Sincerely,

Paul Smith
2291 Orleans Ave
Terre Haute, IN 47805
EM-1604 "brenda kroupa" <bcrowpa@comcast.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/8/2007 5:02:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

brenda kroupa
5609 bloomingdale ave
richmond, VA 23228
USA
bcrowpa@comcast.net


EM-1605 Daniel Yetter <dfyetter@hotmail.com> BLM Land -- Oregon 12/8/2007 5:19:12 Bureau of Land Management
Oregon/Washington State Office
ATTN: Western Oregon Planning Revision (OR930.1)
PO Box 2965
Portland, Oregon 97208

Dear BLM,

Please accept these comments on the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am a citizen concerned with the management of these lands.

For the last ten years, the Bureau of Land Management administered forests in western Oregon under the Northwest Forest Plan. This ensured these forests continued to provide important public values. These forests can also provide jobs and wood products as a by-product of forest restoration such as thinning young plantation forests.

I am concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating may lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy. Many of these forests are currently protected for water quality, salmon and wildlife concerns.

Much of the BLM forests in western Oregon are adjacent to private landowners who would like to see nearby forest managed to protect their home from wildfire and to preserve their water supply, scenery, and recreation opportunities.

Please continue to protect the western BLM forests that are now protected.

Sincerely,

Daniel Yetter
10 Marsh Ave.
Salem, NH 03079
EM-1606 "Becky Ward" <beqw@hotmail.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/8/2007 5:42:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Becky Ward
92 W. Main ST
Orwell, OH 44076
USA
beqw@hotmail.com


EM-1607 "Red Taylor" <redt@surewest.net> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/8/2007 6:42:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Red Taylor
100 Southern Cross Court
Roseville, CA 95747
USA
redt@surewest.net


EM-1608 "Rachel Simpson-Loizou" <rachlou90@hotmail.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/8/2007 7:32:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Rachel Simpson-Loizou
216 Ben Venue Rd.
Fombell, PA 16123
USA
rachlou90@hotmail.com


EM-1609 "Shirley Trimble" <srtrimble@lucasvalley.net> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/8/2007 8:52:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Shirley Trimble
332 Mt. Shasta Drive
San Rafael, CA 95903
USA
srtrimble@lucasvalley.net


EM-1610 "Martha Williams" <marthaw200@yahoo.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/8/2007 8:52:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Martha Williams
PO Box 13691
Roanoke, VA 24036
USA
marthaw200@yahoo.com


EM-1611 "Lauren Kramer" <lakrugratsfan@hotmail.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/8/2007 9:22:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Lauren Kramer
1353 Walnut Lane
Macungie, PA 18062
USA
lakrugratsfan@hotmail.com


EM-1612 Bill McWhorter <billmaxmcw@comcast.net> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/8/2007 9:25:33 Dear BLM,
I live in Oregon for a variety of reasons, including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won?t be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon?s spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

Bill McWhorter
2565 W. 27th Ave
Eugene, OR 97405
EM-1613 "Phil Hesse" <philhesse@cableone.net> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/8/2007 9:32:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Phil Hesse
1025 S. Emerson
Idaho Falls, ID 83404
USA
philhesse@cableone.net


EM-1614 "Walter Gove" <walter.r.gove@vanderbilt.edu> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/8/2007 9:52:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Walter Gove
6624 Rolling Fork Dr
Nashville, TN 37205-3917
USA
walter.r.gove@vanderbilt.edu


EM-1615 "Sarah Kerr" <stressedfemale@adelphia.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/8/2007 10:42:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Sarah Kerr
5558E Old William Penn Hwy
Export, PA 15632
USA
stressedfemale@adelphia.net


EM-1616 "Richard Stewart" <stewartrichard2002@yahoo.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/8/2007 11:12:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Richard Stewart
7882 13Th Street
Westminster, CA 92683
USA
stewartrichard2002@yahoo.com


EM-1617 "Cynthia Ortiz" <clcortiz@prodigy.net> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/8/2007 11:22:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Cynthia Ortiz
491 Hamilton Pl
Hackensack, NJ 07601-1514
USA
clcortiz@prodigy.net


EM-1618 "Emma Ausman" <lunnalupin@dslextreme.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/8/2007 11:52:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Emma Ausman
4560 Willow Crest Ave.
Toluca Lake, CA 91602
USA
lunnalupin@dslextreme.com


EM-1619 "Harrison B Albert" <h.b.albert@mindspring.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/8/2007 12:02:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Harrison B Albert
2380 Hillsdale Way
Boulder, CO 80305-5624
USA
h.b.albert@mindspring.com


EM-1620 "Jenny Ruckdeschel" <jennyel28@aol.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/8/2007 12:02:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Jenny Ruckdeschel
516 Oakley Road
Haverford, PA 19041
USA
jennyel28@aol.com


EM-1621 "Timothy Taylor" <timakirataylor@yahoo.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/8/2007 12:42:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bad
Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Timothy Taylor
3021 S. Jay St.
Denver, CO 80227
USA
timakirataylor@yahoo.com


EM-1622 "Martha W Bushnell" <marthawdb@comcast.net> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/8/2007 13:42:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

Please reevaluate and expand the areas that should be recommended as wilderness
in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau of Land Management's (BLM)
preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite a total of 146 inventoried
areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process for evaluating and determining
wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate,
resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics
being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, why does BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness
recommendations?

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Martha W Bushnell
502 Ord Drive
Boulder, CO 80303-4732
USA
marthawdb@comcast.net


EM-1623 "Carmen Blakely" <blakelycharity@msn.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/8/2007 13:52:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Carmen Blakely
1439 Windjammer Loop
Lutz, FL 33559-6734
USA
blakelycharity@msn.com


EM-1624 "Amarantha Harrison" <amaranthah@mac.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/8/2007 14:12:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Amarantha Harrison
40374 Waterman Rd
Homer, AK 99603-9404
USA
amaranthah@mac.com


EM-1625 "Debbie Sturt" <sighisoara@mailcity.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/8/2007 14:22:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Debbie Sturt
2905 David Ave.
#3
Pacific Grove, CA 93950
USA
sighisoara@mailcity.com


EM-1626 "Amarantha Harrison" <amaranthah@mac.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/8/2007 14:32:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Amarantha Harrison
40374 Waterman Rd
Homer, AK 99603-9404
USA
amaranthah@mac.com


EM-1627 "Connie Devine" <squirelfox@aol.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/8/2007 15:02:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Connie Devine
5869 Southwind Dr
San Jose, CA 95138-1845
USA
squirelfox@aol.com


EM-1628 "Denise Lytle" <queenweezy@excite.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/8/2007 15:22:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Denise Lytle
73 Poplar St
Fords, NJ 08863-1836
USA
queenweezy@excite.com


EM-1629 "David Depew" <ddotdave@aol.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/8/2007 15:22:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

David Depew
1587 Mount Shasta Ave.
Milpitas, CA 95035
USA
ddotdave@aol.com


EM-1630 "Sandy Liu" <cailin120@hotmail.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/8/2007 15:42:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Sandy Liu
439 Deodar Ln.
Bradbury, CA 91010
USA
cailin120@hotmail.com


EM-1631 "Therese Debing" <buddhabear88@hotmail.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/8/2007 15:52:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Therese Debing
885 Seamist Place #204
Ventura, CA 93003
USA
buddhabear88@hotmail.com


EM-1632 Mehmet McMillan <mehmetmcmillan@yahoo.com> Protect BLM Forests 12/8/2007 15:59:59 Bureau of Land Management
Oregon/Washington State Office
ATTN: Western Oregon Planning Revision (OR930.1)
PO Box 2965
Portland, Oregon 97208

Dear BLM,

Please accept these comments on the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am a citizen concerned with the management of these lands.

For the last ten years, the Bureau of Land Management administered forests in western Oregon under the Northwest Forest Plan. This ensured these forests continued to provide important public values. These forests can also provide jobs and wood products as a by-product of forest restoration such as thinning young plantation forests.

I am concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating may lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy. Many of these forests are currently protected for water quality, salmon and wildlife concerns.

Much of the BLM forests in western Oregon are adjacent to private landowners who would like to see nearby forest managed to protect their home from wildfire and to preserve their water supply, scenery, and recreation opportunities.

Please continue to protect the western BLM forests that are now protected.

Sincerely,

Mehmet McMillan
POB 853
Springville, CA 93265

760-378-3345
EM-1633 Mehmet McMillan <mehmetmcmillan@yahoo.com> Protect BLM Forests 12/8/2007 15:59:59 Bureau of Land Management
Oregon/Washington State Office
ATTN: Western Oregon Planning Revision (OR930.1)
PO Box 2965
Portland, Oregon 97208

Dear BLM,

Please accept these comments on the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am a citizen concerned with the management of these lands.

For the last ten years, the Bureau of Land Management administered forests in western Oregon under the Northwest Forest Plan. This ensured these forests continued to provide important public values. These forests can also provide jobs and wood products as a by-product of forest restoration such as thinning young plantation forests.

I am concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating may lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy. Many of these forests are currently protected for water quality, salmon and wildlife concerns.

Much of the BLM forests in western Oregon are adjacent to private landowners who would like to see nearby forest managed to protect their home from wildfire and to preserve their water supply, scenery, and recreation opportunities.

Please continue to protect the western BLM forests that are now protected.

Sincerely,

Mehmet McMillan
POB 853
Springville, CA 93265

760-378-3345
EM-1634 "neg nakayama" <meguo@hotmail.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/8/2007 17:42:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness EBull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

neg nakayama
12534 moorpark st
studio city, CA 91604
USA
meguo@hotmail.com


EM-1635 "Brian Gibbons" <btpg2252@yahoo.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/8/2007 17:42:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Brian Gibbons
9133 Edmonston Ter Apt 304
Greenbelt, MD 20770-4568
USA
btpg2252@yahoo.com


EM-1636 "Cheri Carlson" <cjbaw@hotmail.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/8/2007 17:52:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Old Growth is Such a Precious resource for future generations, NO more of it
sohould be removed. Every day I wish the first settlers in my area had not been
so greedy and there were some old growth areas left here for us to enjoy...all
we have is a few stumps and imagination. We have brought ourselves to this serious
threat of global warming. It's time to stop raping the earth.

Sincerely,

Cheri Carlson
20505 64th DR NE
Arlington, WA 98223
USA
cjbaw@hotmail.com


EM-1637 "Harriette Frank" <lfrank1999@aol.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/8/2007 18:22:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Harriette Frank
3603 Westover Rd
Durham, NC 27707-5032
USA
lfrank1999@aol.com


EM-1638 "Lisa Butch" <butchybonbon@hotmail.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/8/2007 18:42:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Lisa Butch
PO Box 523
Meadville, PA 16335-0523
USA
butchybonbon@hotmail.com


EM-1639 "Andrea Levy" <Anddale@yahoo.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/8/2007 19:02:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Andrea Levy
34 Mcallister road
Toronto, ON M3H 2N2
Canada
Anddale@yahoo.com


EM-1640 "Colleen Keith" <wizkid2be@aol.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/8/2007 20:12:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Colleen Keith
PO Box 2099
Victorville, CA 92393
USA
wizkid2be@aol.com


EM-1641 "John Chastain" <gt5612a@hotmail.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/8/2007 20:22:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

John Chastain
2177 Ellis Farm Dr
Marietta, GA 30064
USA
gt5612a@hotmail.com


EM-1642 "Marjorie-* Moss" <moss_m@att.net> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/8/2007 20:22:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Marjorie-* Moss
2736 Caminito San Pablo
Del Mar, CO 92014
USA
moss_m@att.net


EM-1643 "Clinton Coleman" <wiseoldal@charter.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/8/2007 20:42:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Clinton Coleman
201 Ginger Ln
Easley, SC 29642-1319
USA
wiseoldal@charter.net


EM-1644 "Billy and Loretta Bryant" <brbry413@yahoo.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/8/2007 20:42:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Billy and Loretta Bryant
397 Berry Rd
Pelzer, SC 29669
USA
brbry413@yahoo.com


EM-1645 "Jeannine Coleman" <jninipi@charter.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/8/2007 20:42:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Jeannine Coleman
201 Ginger Ln
Easley, SC 29642-1319
USA
jninipi@charter.net


EM-1646 "J.B. Coleman" <jbcoleman3@charter.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/8/2007 20:42:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

J.B. Coleman
201 Ginger Ln
Easley, SC 29642-1319
USA
jbcoleman3@charter.net


EM-1647 "Jane Bryant" <jaybeeco@charter.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/8/2007 20:42:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Jane Bryant
214 Ashmore Bridge Rd
Mauldin, SC 29662-2841
USA
jaybeeco@charter.net


EM-1648 "John Congdon" <jhcongdon@yahoo.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/8/2007 21:42:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

John Congdon
4053 Kingman Blvd
Des Moines, IA 50311-3515
USA
jhcongdon@yahoo.com


EM-1649 "Lexie de Fremery" <ldefremery@netscape.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/8/2007 22:22:01 December 08, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Lexie de Fremery
7837 Lakeshore Dr
Sagle, ID 83860-9163
USA
ldefremery@netscape.net


EM-1650 stuart phillips <stulips@hotmail.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/9/2007 0:47:21 Dear BLM,
I live in Oregon for a variety of reasons, including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won?t be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon?s spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

stuart phillips
212 benjamin
eugene, OR 97404

541-461-1384
EM-1651 "Kirk Ramble" <karamble@comcast.net> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/9/2007 4:02:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Kirk Ramble
458 Penna. Ave.
York, PA 17404
USA
karamble@comcast.net


EM-1652 "Dennis Wingle" <denniswingle@verizon.net> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/9/2007 4:02:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Dennis Wingle
311 Fourth Street
Shoemakersville, PA 19555-1517
USA
denniswingle@verizon.net


EM-1653 "Marsha Wells" <marshawells@hotmail.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/9/2007 5:52:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Marsha Wells
110 Twyford Ave
Sistersville, WV 26175
USA
marshawells@hotmail.com


EM-1654 "Kim Sandholdt" <ksand1@juno.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/9/2007 9:02:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Kim Sandholdt
300 Merrydale Rd # 326
San Rafael, CA 94903-3954
USA
ksand1@juno.com


EM-1655 "Susan Selbin" <sselbin@hotmail.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/9/2007 9:02:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Susan Selbin
600 Alcalde Pl.
Albuquerque, NM 87104
USA
sselbin@hotmail.com


EM-1656 "Marilyn A. Waltasti" <mwaltasti@msn.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/9/2007 9:12:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Marilyn A. Waltasti
770 W. Flagstick Drive
Oro Valley, AZ 85755
USA
mwaltasti@msn.com


EM-1657 "Phyllis Mollen" <vaponygirl@hotmail.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/9/2007 9:12:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Phyllis Mollen
205 W 91st St
New York, NY 10024-1322
USA
vaponygirl@hotmail.com


EM-1658 "Ricardo Hernandez" <rhgv@hotmail.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/9/2007 10:22:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Ricardo Hernandez
P. O. Box 1430
Bilbao, 48080
Spain
rhgv@hotmail.com


EM-1659 "Randall Tyers" <tyersome@nature.berkeley.edu> RE: Unacceptable wilderness evaluation and recommendation process 12/9/2007 11:02:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

Please begin a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be recommended
as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The BLM's preferred
alternative recommends only five of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed
by the plan. The BLM's process for evaluating and determining wilderness resources
and wilderness recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known
wild places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.


Sincerely,

Randall Tyers
63 Oakvale Ave
Berkeley, CA 94705-2403
USA
tyersome@nature.berkeley.edu


EM-1660 "Karen Linarez" <kjlinarez@yahoo.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/9/2007 11:32:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Karen Linarez
5249 Manzanita Ave
Carmichael, CA 95608
USA
kjlinarez@yahoo.com


EM-1661 "Andrew Sutphin" <asutphin@hotmail.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/9/2007 12:22:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Andrew Sutphin
22727 Mariano Street
Woodland Hills, CA 91367
USA
asutphin@hotmail.com


EM-1662 "Harriet Shalat" <shalat@wildmail.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/9/2007 13:22:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Harriet Shalat
102-42 62 Drive
Forest Hills, NY 11375
USA
shalat@wildmail.com


EM-1663 "Derik Smith" <deriksmith@comcast.net> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision 12/9/2007 13:40:34 Derik Smith
2430 35th Street
Springfield, OR 97477-1820


December 9, 2007

Edward Shepard
OR/WA State Director
Bureau of Land Management
PO Box 2965
Portland, OR 97208


Dear Edward Shepard:

Please accept the following comments on the BLM's Draft Environmental
Impact Statement for the Revision of the Resource Management Plans for
Western Oregon.

Dear Sir, please note that I am in agreement of the following statements;

None of the three alternatives presented in the DEIS meet the requirements
of the O&C Act because they do not manage the land for the dominant use of
timber production. Reserving the majority (52%) of the suitable
timberlands for the purpose of a listed species is contrary to the O&C Act.

Because of the unique nature of the O&C Lands, by law these lands are not
available to be part of a reserve system designed to recover a listed
species. The BLM should consider active management for the protection of
listed and sensitive species and their habitat before adopting passive,
reserve strategies. The alternative selected by the BLM, however, should
be one that will not jeopardize the continued existence of listed species
within the species entire habitat range.

The BLM must develop and analyzes at least one alternative that maximizes
the amount of land in timber production and receipts to local county
governments, and meets its no jeopardy obligation.

Congress and the Administration must ensure that when the Plan is
finalized that the BLM receives adequate funding so that it can be fully
implemented.

When implemented, the Plan should live up to the full commitment that was
made to local counties.

Timber sale revenues must generate at least an amount equal to the funding
that was provided to local counties through the Secure Rural Schools and
Community Self-Determination Act on a yearly basis.

All BLM administered land should be managed to minimize the threat of
catastrophic wildfire on these lands and surrounding state and private
lands.

Access should be maintained through BLM administered lands for private
land access, fire suppression, as well as recreational uses, such as
hunting, fishing, boating and sightseeing.

There afore mentioned points are desperately need to secure the economic
future of the Pacific Northwest!

In summary, the economic viability of our rural communities and the
overall health of our federal forests are of vital importance to me. I
ask that you give these comments full consideration as you prepare the
final Environmental Impact Statement and select the final management plans
for the Western Oregon BLM Districts.

Sincerely,


Derik Smith

EM-1664 "Diane Walsh" <DIANEWALSH@EXCITE.COM> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/9/2007 13:42:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Diane Walsh
144 Soundview Avenue
Shelton, CT 06484
USA
DIANEWALSH@EXCITE.COM


EM-1665 "Verne Huser" <riverne@newmexico.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/9/2007 14:42:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

I have been running rivers for fifty years including the Rogue, initially in
1961, and a dozen others Oregon rivers. Watersheds need the kind of protection
that BLM can provide if youi make the appropriate choices. It's time to do the
right thing.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Verne Huser
7106 Coors Trl NW
Albuquerque, NM 87120-2779
USA
riverne@newmexico.com


EM-1666 "Prentice Ross" <dodat@mail.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/9/2007 15:12:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Prentice Ross
333 Sw Oak Street 309
Portland, OR 97204
USA
dodat@mail.com


EM-1667 "Brad Miller" <b_red@hotmail.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/9/2007 15:52:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Brad Miller
316 S Madison
Anthony, KS 67003
USA
b_red@hotmail.com


EM-1668 "RAchel Dolney" <rrdolney@netscape.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/9/2007 16:22:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

RAchel Dolney
1315 Monte Ln
Winter Park, FL 32792-2203
USA
rrdolney@netscape.net


EM-1669 "Sue Collins" <cscollin@mac.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/9/2007 16:22:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Sue Collins
5618 S. Captain Kidd Ct., Unit C
Tempe, AZ 85283-2036
USA
cscollin@mac.com


EM-1670 "Theresa Scott" <mtch63@yahoo.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/9/2007 18:12:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Theresa Scott
8405 Colfax Drive
King George, VA 22485
USA
mtch63@yahoo.com


EM-1671 "Yuko Nakajima" <yn24@uclink.berkeley.edu> Flawed and failed wilderness evaluation and recommendation process 12/9/2007 18:12:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

Please begin an immediate reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should
be recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The BLM's
preferred alternative shockingly only recommends only five of 146 inventoried
areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process for evaluating and determining
wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate,
resulting in failure to include many well-known wild places exhibiting excellent
wilderness characteristics.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.


Sincerely,

Yuko Nakajima
63 Oakvale Ave
Berkeley, CA 94705-2403
USA
yn24@uclink.berkeley.edu


EM-1672 "Robert Conway" <rconwayaz@cox.net> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/9/2007 18:22:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Robert Conway
909 W. Harvard Dr.
Tempe, AZ 85283
USA
rconwayaz@cox.net


EM-1673 "Axel C. Ringe" <onyxfarm@bellsouth.net> Protect BLM Forests 12/9/2007 18:43:32 Bureau of Land Management
Oregon/Washington State Office
ATTN: Western Oregon Planning Revision (OR930.1)
PO Box 2965
Portland, Oregon 97208

Dear BLM,

Please accept these comments on the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am a citizen concerned with the management of these lands.

For the last ten years, the Bureau of Land Management administered forests in western Oregon under the Northwest Forest Plan. This ensured these forests continued to provide important public values. These forests can also provide jobs and wood products as a by-product of forest restoration such as thinning young plantation forests.

I am concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating may lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy. Many of these forests are currently protected for water quality, salmon and wildlife concerns.

Much of the BLM forests in western Oregon are adjacent to private landowners who would like to see nearby forest managed to protect their home from wildfire and to preserve their water supply, scenery, and recreation opportunities.

Please continue to protect the western BLM forests that are now protected.

Sincerely,

Axel C. Ringe
1840 Lafayette Road
New Market, TN 37820
EM-1674 "Robert Hill" <rhill@athenet.net> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/9/2007 20:02:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Robert Hill
E1251 Channel Pk Dr
Waupaca, WI 54981-9737
USA
rhill@athenet.net


EM-1675 "Thane Harpole" <hungryharpole@yahoo.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/9/2007 20:22:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Thane Harpole
2668 Kings Creek Rd
Hayes, VA 23072
USA
hungryharpole@yahoo.com


EM-1676 Lawrence Jones <larry-crystalpalace@comcast.net> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/9/2007 20:38:25 Dear BLM,
Why are we still messing with the Northwest Forest Plan? I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Lawrence Jones
4659 NE Crystal Ln
Portland, OR 97218

503 8673697
EM-1677 "Andrew C. Jones" <andrucharlz@webtv.net> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/9/2007 21:02:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Andrew C. Jones
5399 Chaison
Gladstone, MI 49837
USA
andrucharlz@webtv.net


EM-1678 "Chris Carlon" <c.carlon@freescale.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/9/2007 21:22:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Chris Carlon
2902 W. Curry St.
Chandler, AZ 85224-1047
USA
c.carlon@freescale.com


EM-1679 "Bobby Wynn" <bobbywynn2003@yahoo.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/9/2007 21:22:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Bobby Wynn
122 Bag End Rd
Hendersonville, NC 28739-2286
USA
bobbywynn2003@yahoo.com


EM-1680 "David Adkins" <dv_adkins@hotmail.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/9/2007 21:42:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

David Adkins
1418 Quaker Street
Eugene, OR 97402
USA
dv_adkins@hotmail.com


EM-1681 "thomas alexander" <talexander_95971@yahoo.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/9/2007 22:22:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

thomas alexander
499 bell lane
quincy, CA 95971
USA
talexander_95971@yahoo.com


EM-1682 "Judy Brownstein" <jbrownstein@cox.net> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/9/2007 23:12:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Judy Brownstein
2601 E Windsor Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85008
USA
jbrownstein@cox.net


EM-1683 "Karen Gonzales" <karen_gonzales@hotmail.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/9/2007 23:12:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

These areas need to be protected, not only for their natural beauty, but to
help slow global warming, and provide land for the wildlife in our nation to live
in peace. With big business and the lumber industry out to destroy as much of
our natural habitat as possible, we need to step up our actions to preserve all
the land we can.

Thank you for considering my views.

Sincerely,

Karen Gonzales
690 Thornbird Dr.
Fallon, NV 89406
USA
karen_gonzales@hotmail.com


EM-1684 "Wanda Hendrix" <Hiwandada@aol.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/10/2007 4:02:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Wanda Hendrix
361 Dunes St
Morro Bay, CA 93442
USA
Hiwandada@aol.com


EM-1685 "Karen Frutchey" <karen@mail.seaturtle.org> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/10/2007 4:02:01 December 09, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Karen Frutchey
1720 Poki St Apt 201
Honolulu, HI 96822-4499
USA
karen@mail.seaturtle.org


EM-1686 "Arran Thomson" <nehara777@naturemail.net> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/10/2007 4:02:01 December 10, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management�s (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas,
despite a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The
BLM�s process for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness
recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild
places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM�s analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM�s legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness � Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and
Coast Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Arran Thomson
4317 NE 7th Ave
Portland, OR 97211
USA
nehara777@naturemail.net


EM-1687 "aimee whitman" <thegen@verizon.net> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/10/2007 7:12:01 December 10, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

aimee whitman
28 wood road
bedford hills, NY 10507-1218
USA
thegen@verizon.net


EM-1688 "Andra Rebar" <puffin2004@comcast.net> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/10/2007 7:12:01 December 10, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Andra Rebar
"5353 Columbia Pike, #511"
Unit 511
Arlington, VA 22204
USA
puffin2004@comcast.net


EM-1689 CN=Alan Hoffmeister/OU=ORSO/OU=OR/OU=BLM/O=DOI Fw: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions 12/10/2007 8:05:02 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 12/10/2007 08:04 AM -----

Alexander Walker <alexcarol@comcast.net>

12/08/2007 02:23 PM

To
Alan_Hoffmeister@blm.gov
cc

Subject
BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions








Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue Portland, Oregon
Portland, OR 97208

CC: Oregon Congressional delegation

Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions

Dear BLM,

Thank you for the opportunity to send you this email.  I want to  
express my concern over how Oregon's federal forests will fare under  
the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am concerned that the changes  
being proposed will erode the protections that are provided by the  
Northwest Forest Plan.  I love our Oregon forests and, while I  
understand the desire to support the timber business in Oregon, I  
think the proposed changes will cost us too much in degraded  
habitat,  harmed wildlife and ugly scars that mar the beauty of our  
forests.

The "preferred alternative" proposes to clear-cut 140,000 acres of  
Oregon's old-growth every decade, build 1,000 mile of new logging  
roads, and create over 100,000 miles of new Off Highway Vehicle  
Emphasis Areas.  This would reduce the amount of Oregon  roadless  
areas, threaten many species, hurt water quality and negatively  
impact non-motorized recreation.

Most Americans want federal land managers to support the practice of  
thinning second growth forests, helping to safeguard communities from  
wildfire and protecting what remains of our nation's ancient forests.  
I have heard that many Oregon forest managers are moving in this  
direction. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many  
of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - tthese forest  
managers are providing wood to local mills while actually improving  
conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-
growth forests.

In contrast, the WOPR proposes to increase old-growth clear-cutting,  
including some old-growth forests older than our nation.  The WOPR  
would destroy some of Oregon's most special places.

Please protect remaining old-growth forests, focus active management  
of BLM lands in already logged-over areas, and concentrate job  
opportunities in restoration thinning projects that benefit  
watersheds and generate wood products without the damage done by  
clear-cutting.

Sincerely,

Carolynn McIntosh
46037 Goodpasture Rd
Vida, OR  97488
alexcarol@comcast.net
EM-1690 CN=Alan Hoffmeister/OU=ORSO/OU=OR/OU=BLM/O=DOI Fw: Comment on BLM Emphasis Area 12/10/2007 8:13:21 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 12/10/2007 08:12 AM -----
----- Forwarded by James Whittington/MDFO/OR/BLM/DOI on 12/10/2007 08:08 AM -----

"Steven Hess" <hess@isp.com>

12/09/2007 03:15 PM

To
<jim_whittington@blm.gov>
cc

Subject
Comment on BLM Emphasis Area








 

Dear BLM Contact Person,

This letter is to address the OHV Emphasis Areas being proposed as part of Bureau of Land Management's Western Oregon Plan Revisions (WOPR) . We live in an area which will be directly affected by an OHV emphasis area decision, and we are concerned about the impact on us personally.

We live on 7.3 acres of property on Thompson Creek Road in Selma, Oregon, in the Illinois Valley. We have lived here on Thompson Creek Road for ten years. I have always been a good resident and citizen. Until earlier this year we raised "at risk" Foster kids. I would like my comment(s) to be herd and considered about the proposed Emphasis Area in the Thompson Creek Valley area.

The problem with the proposed designation is that the sound resonants off the mountain sides of the entire Thompson Creek Valley. The mountain range(s) go up the one side, across the rear and down the other side of Thompson Creek, much like an amphitheater. Because of the amplified natural sound system in this small valley I request that you delete:     sections 38-7-29, 38-7-33, 39-7-3, 39-7-4, 39-7-5, from the currently proposed area. Also for the same reason; I am requesting sections 38-7-21, 38-7-22, 38-7-27 not be considered at a later date.

Sincerly,

Mr & Mrs Steven Hess, 1899 Thompson Creek Road, Selma, Oregon 97538

 
EM-1691 "Danny Bivens" <dbivens@papemachinery.com> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision 12/10/2007 8:32:12 Danny Bivens
105 Blakely Ave.
Brownsville, OR 97327


December 10, 2007

Edward Shepard
OR/WA State Director
Bureau of Land Management
PO Box 2965
Portland, OR 97208


Dear Edward Shepard:

Please accept the following comments on the BLM's Draft Environmental
Impact Statement for the Revision of the Resource Management Plans for
Western Oregon.

The BLM must develop and analyzes at least one alternative that maximizes
the amount of land in timber production and receipts to local county
governments, and meets its no jeopardy obligation.

Timber sale revenues must generate at least an amount equal to the funding
that was provided to local counties through the Secure Rural Schools and
Community Self-Determination Act on a yearly basis.

All BLM administered land should be managed to minimize the threat of
catastrophic wildfire on these lands and surrounding state and private
lands.

Access should be maintained through BLM administered lands for private
land access, fire suppression, as well as recreational uses, such as
hunting, fishing, boating and sightseeing.

In summary, the economic viability of our rural communities and the
overall health of our federal forests are of vital importance to me. I
ask that you give these comments full consideration as you prepare the
final Environmental Impact Statement and select the final management plans
for the Western Oregon BLM Districts.

Sincerely,


Danny Bivens
541-466-3268

EM-1692 "Brad Behrens" <behrensbrad@hotmail.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/10/2007 9:02:01 December 10, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Brad Behrens
1613 Monroe Ct
Northfield, MN 55057
USA
behrensbrad@hotmail.com


EM-1693 kenny jones <kennykaren1@hotmail.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/10/2007 9:47:16 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

kenny jones
446 ne fargo street
portland, OR 97212
EM-1694 "dusty stepanski" <rprim432@comcast.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/10/2007 10:32:01 December 10, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

dusty stepanski
PO Box 97
Richwood, NJ 08074-0097
USA
rprim432@comcast.net


EM-1695 Scott Jones <scones100@gmail.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/10/2007 10:34:49 Dear BLM,
I grew up in Oregon. My entire family still lives in Oregon. I love Oregon for a variety of reasons, including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won?t be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon?s spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

Scott Jones
878 Peachtree ST
# 724
Atlanta, GA 30309
EM-1696 "nikki martin" <nikkilass@gmail.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/10/2007 10:52:02 December 10, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

nikki martin
PO Box 913
Mount Angel, OR 97362-0913
USA
nikkilass@gmail.com


EM-1697 Nelson Brooke <nbrooke@blackwarriorriver.org> Protect BLM Forests 12/10/2007 11:01:37 Bureau of Land Management
Oregon/Washington State Office
ATTN: Western Oregon Planning Revision (OR930.1)
PO Box 2965
Portland, Oregon 97208

Dear BLM,

Please accept these comments on the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am a citizen concerned with the management of these lands.

For the last ten years, the Bureau of Land Management administered forests in western Oregon under the Northwest Forest Plan. This ensured these forests continued to provide important public values. These forests can also provide jobs and wood products as a by-product of forest restoration such as thinning young plantation forests.

I am concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating may lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy. Many of these forests are currently protected for water quality, salmon and wildlife concerns.

Much of the BLM forests in western Oregon are adjacent to private landowners who would like to see nearby forest managed to protect their home from wildfire and to preserve their water supply, scenery, and recreation opportunities.

Please continue to protect the western BLM forests that are now protected.

Sincerely,

Nelson Brooke
321 Red Oak Road
Birmingham, AL 35206
EM-1698 oshana catranides <oshana@siskiyou.org> Protect BLM Forests 12/10/2007 11:30:28 Bureau of Land Management
Oregon/Washington State Office
ATTN: Western Oregon Planning Revision (OR930.1)
PO Box 2965
Portland, Oregon 97208

Dear BLM,

Thank you for accepting my comments on the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I have been a citizen of Oregon for 35 years, and I am extremely concerned with the management of the lands included in the Western Oregon Plan Revision, and all other BLM lands across the state.

The Northwest Forest Plan used to guide management of BLM lands for the past ten years has ensured these forests continued to provide important public values. These forests also provide jobs and wood products as a by-product of forest restoration such as thinning young plantation forests.

I strongly believe that the changes the BLM is contemplating may lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy. Many of these forests are currently protected for water quality, salmon and wildlife concerns.

Much of the BLM forests in western Oregon are adjacent to private landowners who would like to see nearby forest managed to protect their home from wildfire and to preserve their water supply, scenery, and recreation opportunities.

Please choose the No Action Alternative and continue to protect the western BLM forests that are now protected by the NOrthwest Forest Plan and other environmental laws.

Sincerely,

oshana catranides
321 Clay St
#26
Ashland, OR 97520
EM-1699 Jerry Williams <jerrywilliams_1121@yahoo.com> Protect BLM Forests 12/10/2007 12:26:11 Bureau of Land Management
Oregon/Washington State Office
ATTN: Western Oregon Planning Revision (OR930.1)
PO Box 2965
Portland, Oregon 97208

Dear BLM,

Please accept these comments on the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am a citizen concerned with the management of these lands.

For the last ten years, the Bureau of Land Management administered forests in western Oregon under the Northwest Forest Plan. This ensured these forests continued to provide important public values. These forests can also provide jobs and wood products as a by-product of forest restoration such as thinning young plantation forests.

I am concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating may lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy. Many of these forests are currently protected for water quality, salmon and wildlife concerns.

Much of the BLM forests in western Oregon are adjacent to private landowners who would like to see nearby forest managed to protect their home from wildfire and to preserve their water supply, scenery, and recreation opportunities.

Please continue to protect the western BLM forests that are now protected.

Sincerely,

Jerry Williams
531 Windamare Terr
HOT SPRINGS , AR 71913

501-767-2274
EM-1700 "Jennifer Delker" <jennifer@utahsigngirl.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/10/2007 12:32:01 December 10, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Jennifer Delker
657 Florence Ave.
Astoria, OR 97103
USA
jennifer@utahsigngirl.com


EM-1701 Lisa Hatten <lisa.hatten@earthlink.net> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/10/2007 15:30:03 Dear BLM,
I live in Oregon for a variety of reasons, including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won?t be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon?s spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

Lisa Hatten
5226 NE 22nd Ave
Portland, OR 97211
EM-1702 David Reagan <dreagan@direclynx.net> Protect BLM Forests 12/10/2007 15:37:17 Bureau of Land Management
Oregon/Washington State Office
ATTN: Western Oregon Planning Revision (OR930.1)
PO Box 2965
Portland, Oregon 97208

Dear BLM,

Please accept these comments on the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am a citizen concerned with the management of these lands.

For the last ten years, the Bureau of Land Management administered forests in western Oregon under the Northwest Forest Plan. This ensured these forests continued to provide important public values. These forests can also provide jobs and wood products as a by-product of forest restoration such as thinning young plantation forests.

I am concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating may lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy. Many of these forests are currently protected for water quality, salmon and wildlife concerns.

Much of the BLM forests in western Oregon are adjacent to private landowners who would like to see nearby forest managed to protect their home from wildfire and to preserve their water supply, scenery, and recreation opportunities.

Please continue to protect the western BLM forests that are now protected.

Sincerely,

David Reagan
138 Circle Drive
Hot Springs, AR 71901

5016238425
EM-1703 "Angela Zehava" <angela.zehava@stanfordalumni.org> New Logging 12/10/2007 16:07:10 Dear Administrator:

I would like to register my outrage that this Administration is attempting to increase logging in our state of Oregon.  This administration is very unpopular here, it is wheezing it's last, and we will not tolerate last minute fiddling with our environment.  This is OUR land.  We camp here, hike here, fish here.  Our water (unlike that in Texas where I grew up in the terribly polluted city of Houston) is clean and we will keep it that way.

Throwing more logging to depressed logging communities is like giving a fix to someone trying to overcome drug addiction.  The logging industry was unnaturally and unsustainably BLOATED for many decades, making enormous fortunes off of publicly owned resources.  It is a natural process, a natural correction, that these communities are experiencing.  They need help, but not this kind of help.

Our environment is recovering in this state and we plan to keep it healthy and alive.  America needs to be planting the more sustainable HEMP crop for it's paper and textile needs.

I oppose any increase in logging in Oregon and look forward to voting for Presidential and Senatorial candidates who will ensure protection of our fragile planet next year.

Yours Truly,

Angela Zehava 



EM-1704 Don Kuhns <dnskuhns@comcast.net> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/10/2007 18:17:44 Dear BLM,
I live in Oregon for a variety of reasons, including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won?t be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon?s spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

Don Kuhns
1380 SW Scott Street
Corvallis, OR 97333
EM-1705 "Vanessa Beyers" <open.up.your.mind@gmail.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation! 12/10/2007 18:42:01 December 10, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Vanessa Beyers
8310 Se Clay St.
Portland, OR 97216
USA
open.up.your.mind@gmail.com


EM-1706 "Diane Weinstein" <diane_weinstein@msn.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/10/2007 19:42:01 December 10, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Diane Weinstein
24116 SE 45th Place
Issaquah, WA 98029
USA
diane_weinstein@msn.com


EM-1707 "Sharon Karson" <sakarson@juno.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/10/2007 21:32:01 December 10, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Sharon Karson
3630 Carefree Circle North
Colorado Springs, CO 80917
USA
sakarson@juno.com


EM-1708 Andrew Schneller <ajschneller@hotmail.com> Protect BLM Forests 12/10/2007 21:37:41 Bureau of Land Management
Oregon/Washington State Office
ATTN: Western Oregon Planning Revision (OR930.1)
PO Box 2965
Portland, Oregon 97208

Dear BLM,

Please accept these comments on the Western Oregon Plan Revisions; I am adamantly opposed to the revisions. I am a former Forest Service employee concerned with the management of these amazing public lands.

For the last ten years, the Bureau of Land Management administered forests in western Oregon under the Northwest Forest Plan. This ensured these forests continued to provide important public values. These forests can also provide jobs and wood products as a by-product of forest restoration such as thinning young plantation forests.

I am concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating may lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy. Many of these forests are currently protected for water quality, salmon and wildlife concerns.

Much of the BLM forests in western Oregon are adjacent to private landowners who would like to see nearby forest managed to protect their home from wildfire and to preserve their water supply, scenery, and recreation opportunities.

Please continue to protect the western BLM forests that are now protected.

Please protect all the mature and old growth forests that remain, and to focus on thinning the plantations we already have. The thousands of acres of needed thinning will help old clearcuts recover, while providing jobs and logs to the mills. The size of trees from plantations is the most desirable size now for most mills.

2. Over 75% of western Oregon forests have already been clearcut. We can get the wood products we need from these plantations and leave the unlogged public forests for recreation and wildlife.

3. Owls, salmon, murrelets and other species depend on the BLM to protect their habitat. There is nowhere else they can live. God created the diversity of these forests. The BLM has a duty to protect it.

4. Under the new proposal, BLM no longer has to help endangered species to recover, they only have to avoid killing them off entirely. This is called "avoiding jeopardy". Owls, murrelets and salmon should not be reduced to struggling in the category, "avoiding jeopardy," an inch above extinction. We have a duty to protect the animals we share our home with.

5. Oregon has successfully diversified away from timber as the primary industry, so our public forests should be used to serve a diversity of needs. The BLM should leave the unlogged public lands for the rest of us and for the animals and plants that need homes too.

7. Property values in western Oregon are diminished by logging the surrounding beautiful forests, or by subjecting a property's water source to logging, herbicides, or ammonia-based fertilizers.

8. The BLM lands are intermixed with private lands, so many people use these lands for recreation. It's not fun to recreate in a tree farm or a clearcut.

9. Protect western Oregon BLM lands for animals and fish, recreation and clean water. BLM is intermixed with industrial private lands that cannot be used to protect public resources, only public lands can do that.

10. The Northwest Forest Plan is an integrated plan that includes both BLM lands and National Forest lands. The BLM cannot withdraw from this plan and eliminate protection for old-growth forests, without undermining the whole thing. Taking BLM out of the Northwest Forest Plan would be like pulling a thread that unravels the whole blanket.

11. Why are these federally owned forest lands managed by the BLM? The government should consider transferring management of these forest lands to the Forest Service, so they can remain an integral part of the integrated Northwest Forest Plan.

12. BLM lands play an integral role in conserving fish & wildlife habitat, including imperiled species like pacific salmon, spotted owls, and marbled murrelets. Two of the important roles of BLM lands is (1) to provide some old growth refuge within a landscape dominated by private land clearcuts, and (2) to provide connectivity/dispersal habitat that connects larger blocks of habitat on National Forest lands. Scientists concluded 12 years ago that endangered wildlife cannot be protected without adequate safeguards for old growth forests on BLM lands.

13. BLM lands protect water quality for salmon, trout and for communities' drinking water. Diminished protection on these lands will affect the drinking water quality for the citizens of Salem, Albany, Corvallis, Eugene, and Roseburg, among others. Many rural residents rely on springs that originate on BLM lands. If these watersheds are not protected, their water supplies could be polluted or interrupted.


14. The BLM should emphasize forest restoration as the best way to ensure community stability. BLM can meet the social and economic objectives of the O&C Act by focusing their efforts on forest restoration, including thinning dense young tree farms that were established following clearcutting. This will help meet the restoration objectives of the Northwest Forest Plan, while also creating jobs and producing some woods projects.

15. Healthy forests support quality of life. Healthy, protected forests are one of the most important natural assets that Oregon's economy is based on. More logging on BLM lands diminish Oregon's quality of life and will reduce property values for those living near these lands.

16. BLM is reverting to a bygone era when timber was the dominant use of our public lands and everything else was secondary, including our drinking water, our air, our old-growth, and our fish & wildlife habitat.

17. I am concerned that the BLM also intends to make it very hard for the public to be involved in future decisions to sell our public forests. Does the BLM intend this planning effort to be the final step before logging so that future decisions to sell our forests don't have to go through any more public review and environmental analysis?

Please protect all remaining old growth forests.

Sincerely,

Andrew Schneller
2208 E. 17th St.
Tucson, AZ 85719

520-327-8978
EM-1709 "Chad Gilton" <chadgilton@yahoo.com> Add More Wilderness 12/10/2007 22:12:01 December 10, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Chad Gilton
5221 NE 26th ave
Portland, OR 97211
USA
chadgilton@yahoo.com


EM-1710 "Glenn McGrew" <reveurgam@gmail.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/10/2007 22:22:01 December 10, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Glenn McGrew
1813 Regal Rdg
Las Cruces, NM 88011-4923
USA
reveurgam@gmail.com


EM-1711 "Leslie Burpo" <lburpo@aol.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/10/2007 22:32:01 December 10, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Leslie Burpo
P. O. Box 5468
Eugene, OR 97405
USA
lburpo@aol.com


EM-1712 "Mary Ann McFarland" <mcfa@loc.gov> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/11/2007 5:12:01 December 11, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Mary Ann McFarland
6832 Corder Lane
Lorton, VA 22079
USA
mcfa@loc.gov


EM-1713 "Raymond Farrington" <teachart@juno.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/11/2007 6:12:01 December 11, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Raymond Farrington
2103 South Ave.
Syracuse, NY 13207
USA
teachart@juno.com


EM-1714 "Stefanie Zier" <mermishwomyn@msn.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/11/2007 7:12:01 December 11, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Stefanie Zier
1935 21st Avenue SE Apt 98
Albany, OR 97322
USA
mermishwomyn@msn.com


EM-1715 CN=Alan Hoffmeister/OU=ORSO/OU=OR/OU=BLM/O=DOI Fw: DON'T PASS THE WOPR 12/11/2007 7:51:51 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 12/11/2007 07:51 AM -----

Benjamin Selker <gumbthegreen@yahoo.co.uk>

12/10/2007 03:34 PM

To
Alan_Hoffmeister@blm.gov
cc

Subject
DON'T PASS THE WOPR








Greetings,

I am writing to you today in regard to the "West OR
Plan Revision", which I am asking you to
rescind/abstain from passing.  (Although my address is
.uk, I am a American citizen.)

I don't know exactly what was going to be done with
these trees, but I do know there is already plenty of
furniture, paper, and houses in existence.  If indeed
any more trees must be cut, they should be less than a
hundred years old, and cut only in some quantity
leaving many trees standing to reach maturity and keep
the soil solid, encourage mycelial growth, and give
habitat to animals.  For these same reasons the old
growth trees are best left alone, so that animal
habitats are not disturbed, as well as for humans.

I have studied ecology, and my father was a chemist,
so I know without a doubt trees are what make clean
air for us to breathe.  They also filter water.  When
a tree is cut, not just the tree dies but mycelium,
earthworms, moss, and lichen as well.  These and the
multitudinous other organisms are also necessary for
human life.


Ben Selker
3947 SE Main ST.
Portland, OR.


     ____________________________________________________________________________________
Never miss a thing.  Make Yahoo your home page.
http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs
EM-1716 "samantha pearson" <simplysampearson@hotmail.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/11/2007 8:22:03 December 11, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

samantha pearson
4724 amicus rd
ruckersvile, VA 22968
USA
simplysampearson@hotmail.com


EM-1717 Diane Frank <dnfrank@nventure.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/11/2007 9:03:59 Dear BLM,
I am a life long Oregonian and the natural world is very important to me and appreciation of its wonders is a value I am teaching my grandchildren. I love taking th bys camping and hiking and showing them the majesty of old growth forests. I am deeply concerned about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won?t be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon?s spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

Please, once this resource is gone it will never return. There are better ways to manage our precious natural resources.

Diane Frank

Diane Frank
5819 NE 27th Avenue
Portland, OR 97211
EM-1718 "Stoyka Chipchakova" <poulet@abv.bg> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/11/2007 10:22:01 December 11, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Stoyka Chipchakova
13 Mart Str. No.8
Sofia, 1000
Bulgaria
poulet@abv.bg


EM-1719 "Kristen Caldon" <kmcaldon@care2.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/11/2007 11:02:01 December 11, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Kristen Caldon
1000 N. Beaver St.
#209
Flagstaff, AZ 86001
USA
kmcaldon@care2.com


EM-1720 "Jerry Dixon" <js2dixon@hotmail.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/11/2007 11:02:01 December 11, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Jerry Dixon
PO Box 1058
Seward, AK 99664-1058
USA
js2dixon@hotmail.com


EM-1721 Sophia Brown <sb894@bard.edu> Protect BLM Forests 12/11/2007 12:15:48 Bureau of Land Management
Oregon/Washington State Office
ATTN: Western Oregon Planning Revision (OR930.1)
PO Box 2965
Portland, Oregon 97208

Dear BLM,

Please accept these comments on the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am a citizen concerned with the management of these lands.

For the last ten years, the Bureau of Land Management administered forests in western Oregon under the Northwest Forest Plan. This ensured these forests continued to provide important public values. These forests can also provide jobs and wood products as a by-product of forest restoration such as thinning young plantation forests.

I am concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating may lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy. Many of these forests are currently protected for water quality, salmon and wildlife concerns.

Much of the BLM forests in western Oregon are adjacent to private landowners who would like to see nearby forest managed to protect their home from wildfire and to preserve their water supply, scenery, and recreation opportunities.

Please continue to protect the western BLM forests that are now protected.

Sincerely,

Sophia Brown
Bard College PO Box 5000
MSC 525
Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12504
EM-1722 Carla Hervert <chervert@peacehealth.org> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/11/2007 12:27:12 Dear BLM,
I live in Oregon for a variety of reasons, including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won?t be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon?s spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

Carla Hervert
2948 Dry Creek Rd.
Eugene, OR 97404
EM-1723 Angie Gallagher <jimangiegall@comcast.net> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/11/2007 12:45:55 Dear BLM,
I live in Oregon for a variety of reasons, including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won?t be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon?s spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

Angie Gallagher
840 NW Lewisberg
Corvallis, OR 97330
EM-1724 "Christine Linnemeier" <clinn@insightbb.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/11/2007 13:42:01 December 11, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Christine Linnemeier
1900 E. Arden Dr.
Bloomington, IN 47401
USA
clinn@insightbb.com


EM-1725 "garth orkney" <orkneyaz@yahoo.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/11/2007 13:42:01 December 11, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

Wilderness areas have an ever increasing value to the average American. As
urban and suburban life deteriorates due to congestion, noise, and pollution,
the treasure of wilderness is more and more dear. Not to mention the intrinsic
benefits to the wildlife within and around wilderness.

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

garth orkney
4036 e. western star blvd.
phoenix, AZ 85044
USA
orkneyaz@yahoo.com


EM-1726 Todd Dwyer <todd-dwyer@hotmail.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/11/2007 15:09:33 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Todd Dwyer
1021 NE 31st ave.
Portland, OR 97212
EM-1727 "Jenna Rytina" <queentutay@earthlink.net> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/11/2007 17:02:04 December 11, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management�s (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas,
despite a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The
BLM�s process for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness
recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild
places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM�s analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM�s legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness � Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and
Coast Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Jenna Rytina
106 Trout Creek Ct.
Las Vegas, NV 89123
USA
queentutay@earthlink.net


EM-1728 beverly andrews <vebros43@aol.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/11/2007 18:26:46 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

beverly andrews
3639 kendra st
eugene, OR 97404

6862989
EM-1729 "Richard Sanders" <quicksand@roadrunner.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/11/2007 22:12:01 December 11, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. My brother
and I recently visited this region in October. In the Wild Rogue North Watershed
Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless areas for aesthetics,
solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife, fisheries, water quality,
and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped places (see Version 2.0 of
this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Richard Sanders
2022 Driftstone Drive
Glendora, CA 91740-5388
USA
quicksand@roadrunner.com


EM-1730 "Cindy Warner" <womyn2005@hotmail.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/12/2007 9:52:01 December 12, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Cindy Warner
43 J Street
Turners Falls, MA 01376
USA
womyn2005@hotmail.com


EM-1731 Lori Quay <plants62@yahoo.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/12/2007 11:23:27 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Lori Quay
30824 Kenady Ln
Cottage Grove, OR 97424
EM-1732 "Marc Tobin" <marc@lostvalley.org> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 12/12/2007 11:56:08 I am in strong opposition to the Western Oregon Plan Revision because we should be protecting, not cutting our old growth forests in Oregon. Also, we should enhancing rather than repealing our stream side logging protections. Also, we should not be supporting corporate welfare of giving away (or selling or leasing at reduced cost) our public lands and resources away to timber companies.

This would also servely impact the watershed that I live in. It would add silt to the stream on the property I live, impact our views and recreation opportunities, and disturb the overall ecology of the watershed.

Sincerely,

Marc Tobin

81868 Lost Valley Lane

Dexter Oregon

97431
EM-1733 CN=Alan Hoffmeister/OU=ORSO/OU=OR/OU=BLM/O=DOI Fw: Protect BLM forests and rivers 12/12/2007 13:09:40 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 12/12/2007 01:09 PM -----

Alice Di Micele <aligator@mind.net>

12/12/2007 01:07 PM

To
Alan_Hoffmeister@blm.gov
cc

Subject
Protect BLM forests and rivers








Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue Portland, Oregon
Portland, OR 97208

CC: Oregon Congressional delegation

Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions

Dear BLM, 

I am very concerned with the direction the Bush Administration is headed in with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of Oregon's federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and may lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

The Bush Administration's preferred alternative proposes to clear-cut 140,000 acres of Oregon's old-growth every decade, build 1,000 mile of new logging roads, and create over 100,000 miles of new Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas-all at the expense of roadless areas, threatened species, water quality and non-motorized recreation.

Most Americans want federal land managers to embrace thinning second growth forests, safeguard communities from wildfire and protect what remains of our nation's ancient forests. Indeed, many Oregon forest managers are already moving beyond the conflicts of the past. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - they are providing wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

In contrast, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clear-cutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at-risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clear-cut these natural treasures as the WOPR proposes to do. 

It is disappointing that at a time when public consensus for old-growth protection and second-growth thinning has never been stronger, the BLM is proposing to clear-cut forests older than our nation and turn complex ecosystems into flammable tree farms. 

I am a river guide on the wild and scenic Rogue River. This proposal would damage the local watersheds and hurt my livelihood as well as those who are fishing guides and fisherman.

Please protect remaining old-growth forests, focus active management of BLM lands in already logged-over areas, and concentrate job opportunities in restoration thinning projects that benefit watersheds and generate wood products without multiplying past mistakes.

Sincerely,

Alice Di Micele
1524 Oregon Ave
Medford OR 97504



http://www.alicedimicele.com
EM-1734 "David Earle" <earlethesquirrel@yahoo.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/12/2007 15:52:01 December 12, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

David Earle
720 Lakeside Drive
Basalt, CO 81621
USA
earlethesquirrel@yahoo.com


EM-1735 Patrick Sarver <fretdoc@hotmail.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/12/2007 17:39:45 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Patrick Sarver
PO box 279
Cottage Grove, OR 97424
EM-1736 Rhonda Baird <rhonda.b@insightbb.com> Protect BLM Forests 12/12/2007 18:15:28 Bureau of Land Management
Oregon/Washington State Office
ATTN: Western Oregon Planning Revision (OR930.1)
PO Box 2965
Portland, Oregon 97208

Dear BLM,

Please accept these comments on the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am a citizen concerned with the management of these lands.

These lands need to be managed and protected not only for restoration and use by the people of Oregon, but for the vital work they do in mitigating climate change and weather patterns in Oregon. As weather patterns and rainfall in the area are subject to increasing extremes, the forest's role needs to be taken more seriously.

For the last ten years, the Bureau of Land Management administered forests in western Oregon under the Northwest Forest Plan. This ensured these forests continued to provide important public values. These forests can also provide jobs and wood products as a by-product of forest restoration such as thinning young plantation forests.

I am concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating may lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy. Many of these forests are currently protected for water quality, salmon and wildlife concerns.

Much of the BLM forests in western Oregon are adjacent to private landowners who would like to see nearby forest managed to protect their home from wildfire and to preserve their water supply, scenery, and recreation opportunities.

Please continue to protect the western BLM forests that are now protected.

Sincerely,

Rhonda Baird
513 W. Green Rd.
Bloomington, IN 47403
EM-1737 "Terry Davis" <terryddavis46@yahoo.com> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision 12/12/2007 23:40:16 Terry Davis
p.o. box 1874
Cave Junction, OR 97523-1874


December 13, 2007

Edward Shepard
OR/WA State Director
Bureau of Land Management
PO Box 2965
Portland, OR 97208


Dear Edward Shepard:

Please accept the following comments on the BLM's Draft Environmental
Impact Statement for the Revision of the Resource Management Plans for
Western Oregon.

It would seem to me that anyone contemplating this plan to further remove
any protection we have left from the warming and drying out of this planet
is some kind of monster that will be remembered as one of the ones who
cared more about sucking up to big timber money than responding to the
screams of their fellow human beings that logging has to end....now...
it's over boys we are at the tipping point of saving this planet and all
the future generations humankind has cared for and you want to make
another few bucks..? for what? The o&c act is not the only narrow minded
consideration here, we have some of the little forest left on a planet
that is gasping for air. Raise your sights just a little and touch your
own human and moral imperative and choose the no action alternative.

In summary, the economic viability of our rural communities and the
overall health of our federal forests are of vital importance to me. I
ask that you give these comments full consideration as you prepare the
final Environmental Impact Statement and select the final management plans
for the Western Oregon BLM Districts.

Sincerely,


Terry Davis
1-541-592-4401

EM-1738 "Larry Lawton" <LLMYSTIC7@yahoo.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/13/2007 4:02:01 December 13, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to request a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should
be recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations should take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
shoul be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness
protection include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey
Creek, Wellington Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek
Additions, and Coast Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to at least include the wild places
listed above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness
characteristics.

Thank you.

Sincerely,

Larry Lawton
18 Aberdeen Gardens Rd
Aberdeen, WA 98520-9639
USA
LLMYSTIC7@yahoo.com


EM-1739 Jess Gwinn <jagmo@bluemarble.net> Protect BLM Forests 12/13/2007 5:33:53 Bureau of Land Management
Oregon/Washington State Office
ATTN: Western Oregon Planning Revision (OR930.1)
PO Box 2965
Portland, Oregon 97208

Dear BLM,

Please accept these comments on the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am a citizen concerned with the management of these lands.

For the last ten years, the Bureau of Land Management administered forests in western Oregon under the Northwest Forest Plan. This ensured these forests continued to provide important public values. These forests can also provide jobs and wood products as a by-product of forest restoration such as thinning young plantation forests.

I am concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating may lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy. Many of these forests are currently protected for water quality, salmon and wildlife concerns.

Much of the BLM forests in western Oregon are adjacent to private landowners who would like to see nearby forest managed to protect their home from wildfire and to preserve their water supply, scenery, and recreation opportunities.

Please continue to protect the western BLM forests that are now protected.

Sincerely,

Jess Gwinn
RR #1, Box 285
Solsberry, IN 47459
EM-1740 "eben futral" <eben@global.t-bird.edu> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/13/2007 7:52:01 December 13, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

eben futral
150 Eagle Ln
Sedona, AZ 86336-7131
USA
eben@global.t-bird.edu


EM-1741 "Teresa Durling" <tadurling@sbcglobal.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/13/2007 8:52:01 December 13, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Teresa Durling
718A 34Th Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94121
USA
tadurling@sbcglobal.net


EM-1742 "Sandy Jacobsen" <sjdmt@yahoo.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/13/2007 10:32:01 December 13, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Sandy Jacobsen
PO Box 784
Grants Pass, OR 97528-0067
USA
sjdmt@yahoo.com


EM-1743 "Mary Turk" <mctfinch@msn.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/13/2007 10:52:01 December 13, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Mary Turk
5818 SW Seymour Ct
Portland, OR 97221
USA
mctfinch@msn.com


EM-1744 "Don Hardwick" <don_hardwick@msn.com> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision 12/13/2007 11:45:13 Don Hardwick
230 Waukeena Way
Cottage Grove, OR 97424-3064


December 13, 2007

Edward Shepard
OR/WA State Director
Bureau of Land Management
PO Box 2965
Portland, OR 97208


Dear Edward Shepard:

Please accept the following comments on the BLM's Draft Environmental
Impact Statement for the Revision of the Resource Management Plans for
Western Oregon.

None of the three alternatives presented in the DEIS meet the requirements
of the O&C Act because they do not manage the land for the dominant use of
timber production. Reserving the majority (52%) of the suitable
timberlands for the purpose of a listed species is contrary to the O&C Act.

Because of the unique nature of the O&C Lands, by law these lands are not
available to be part of a reserve system designed to recover a listed
species. The BLM should consider active management for the protection of
listed and sensitive species and their habitat before adopting passive,
reserve strategies. The alternative selected by the BLM, however, should
be one that will not jeopardize the continued existence of listed species
within the species entire habitat range.

The BLM must develop and analyzes at least one alternative that maximizes
the amount of land in timber production and receipts to local county
governments, and meets its no jeopardy obligation.

Congress and the Administration must ensure that when the Plan is
finalized that the BLM receives adequate funding so that it can be fully
implemented.

When implemented, the Plan should live up to the full commitment that was
made to local counties.

Timber sale revenues must generate at least an amount equal to the funding
that was provided to local counties through the Secure Rural Schools and
Community Self-Determination Act on a yearly basis.

All BLM administered land should be managed to minimize the threat of
catastrophic wildfire on these lands and surrounding state and private
lands.

Access should be maintained through BLM administered lands for private
land access, fire suppression, as well as recreational uses, such as
hunting, fishing, boating and sightseeing.

In summary, the economic viability of our rural communities and the
overall health of our federal forests are of vital importance to me. I
ask that you give these comments full consideration as you prepare the
final Environmental Impact Statement and select the final management plans
for the Western Oregon BLM Districts.

Sincerely,


Don Hardwick

EM-1745 "John Cuda" <jrstar237@yahoo.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/13/2007 11:52:01 December 13, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

John Cuda
2884 Clearview Rd
Allison Park, PA 15101
USA
jrstar237@yahoo.com


EM-1746 Melissa Berube <mberube2@aol.com> Protect BLM Forests 12/13/2007 12:39:56 Bureau of Land Management
Oregon/Washington State Office
ATTN: Western Oregon Planning Revision (OR930.1)
PO Box 2965
Portland, Oregon 97208

Dear BLM,

Please accept these comments on the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am a citizen concerned with the management of these lands.

For the last ten years, the Bureau of Land Management administered forests in western Oregon under the Northwest Forest Plan. This ensured these forests continued to provide important public values. These forests can also provide jobs and wood products as a by-product of forest restoration such as thinning young plantation forests.

I am concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating may lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy. Many of these forests are currently protected for water quality, salmon and wildlife concerns.

Much of the BLM forests in western Oregon are adjacent to private landowners who would like to see nearby forest managed to protect their home from wildfire and to preserve their water supply, scenery, and recreation opportunities.

Please continue to protect the western BLM forests that are now protected.

Sincerely,

Melissa Berube
1985 Shadyhill Terr
Winter Park, FL 32792
EM-1747 "Gail McGlone" <grmcglone@snail-mail.net> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/13/2007 12:52:01 December 13, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Gail McGlone
3510 Dellefield St
New Port Richey, FL 34655-3107
USA
grmcglone@snail-mail.net


EM-1748 "Brendan Hughes" <jesusthedude@hotmail.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/13/2007 14:32:01 December 13, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Brendan Hughes
1709 S Glenwood Ave
Springfield, IL 62704-4005
USA
jesusthedude@hotmail.com


EM-1749 "Amy Pierre" <amypierre@wans.net> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/14/2007 4:02:01 December 14, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Amy Pierre
138 Monte Cresta Ave. #201
Oakland, CA 94611
USA
amypierre@wans.net


EM-1750 "Suzanne N. Smith" <Stone_Griffons@msn.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/14/2007 10:22:01 December 14, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Suzanne N. Smith
6020 Oakland Mills Rd
Sykesville, MD 21784-6914
USA
Stone_Griffons@msn.com


EM-1751 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/14/2007 15:01:00 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Christy Auel
22727 SW Stafford Rd
Tualatin, Oregon 97062
Christy_Auel@verizon.net
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1752 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/14/2007 15:01:55 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Matt Boutet
20 Winter St. Ext.
Saco, ME 04072
matt_boutet@hotmail.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1753 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/14/2007 15:02:36 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Adrian Fields
5844 Iowa Drive
Hood River, OR 97031
adrian.fields@renlearn.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1754 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/14/2007 15:03:24 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,

Krystal Kearney
12265 Garden Valley Rd
Roseburg, OR 97470
la_dolce_vita_04@hotmail.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1755 "Catherine Stanley" <catstanley@hotmail.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/14/2007 16:02:01 December 14, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Catherine Stanley
22055 Allan Ct
Volcano, CA 95689
USA
catstanley@hotmail.com


EM-1756 brad <ccmaint@peak.org> An education for you 12/14/2007 16:33:47 Folks:

Regarding bogus statements reflected
here:
http://www.mailtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20071214/NEWS/712140316

Sent to The Commissioners:


>Date: Fri, 14 Dec 2007 16:29:43 -0800
>To: gilmoudr@jacksoncounty.org
>From: brad <ccmaint@peak.org>
>Subject: An education for you
>Cc: smithdc@jacksoncounty.org,WalkerJW@jacksoncounty.org
>
>Mr. Commissioner:
>
>You said, "They've been using those areas like private playgrounds
>for several years."
>
>That in reference to the Johns Peak area and OHV use.
>
>What does 'several' mean to you? Forty? Fifty? If neither of
>those fit your definition, you are WRONG! Please correct your
>errant statements to the Mail Tribune.
>
>By the way, but what does 'like a private playground...' mean? Is
>there some fencing going on? Is there an active exclusion of some
>but not others?
>
>No.
>
>It is public land. It is open to the public (less and less so). It
>is accessed by the public. That makes it '..like a private
>playground...' how, exactly?
>
>
>Another Mr. Commissioner stated:
>Smith said he was aware of Gilmour's recommendation. "I'm not
>adamantly opposed to it, but I'm not endorsing it either," Smith
>said. He said he will defer to Gilmour's expertise on the issue.
>
>The supposed expertise on this issue is obviously not. 'Deferring'
>to made up supposed facts is altogether irresponsible. Actually,
>paying ANY attention to ANYone that obviously makes up stuff that
>suits them as they go along is foolishness.
>
>Brad Lasniewski
>Rogue River
EM-1757 Heidi Weiss <hkj@pdx.edu> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/14/2007 21:46:52 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Heidi Weiss
2531 SE 18th
Portland , OR 97202
EM-1758 "David Paul Xavier Burch" <DBurch7670@aol.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/15/2007 13:02:01 December 15, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

David Paul Xavier Burch
901 E Victoria St
South Bend, IN 46614-1339
USA
DBurch7670@aol.com


EM-1759 Robert McLaughlin <BobMcLaughlin@myway.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/15/2007 17:12:13 Dear BLM,
I live in California but visit Oregon often. I visit for a variety of reasons, including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won't be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging. If you are not going to respect these areas, why have them in the first place. Not protecting "protected" areas is outrageous and illegal.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon's spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution. I'll stop visiting if my favorite areas are over-run with ORVs

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a great place , while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

Robert McLaughlin
980 Peralta Ave
Albany, CA 94706
EM-1760 "Jack Lupo" <jackenvironment@stny.rr.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/15/2007 18:12:01 December 15, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Jack Lupo
641 Conklin Forks Road
Conklin, NY 13748
USA
jackenvironment@stny.rr.com


EM-1761 "Karen Steele" <msporsche@sbcglobal.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/16/2007 9:52:01 December 16, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Karen Steele
4108 Garibaldi Place
Pleasanton, CA 94566
USA
msporsche@sbcglobal.net


EM-1762 Courtney Childs <courtneychilds@riseup.net> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/16/2007 9:57:50 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Courtney Childs
390 SW 53rd St.
Corvallis, OR 97333
EM-1763 "Suzanna van der Voort" <svdvoort@wanadoo.nl> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/16/2007 12:12:01 December 16, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Suzanna van der Voort
Lareshof 9
Maastricht, NJ 6215 RE
Netherlands
svdvoort@wanadoo.nl


EM-1764 "Karen Johnson" <mogen70@yahoo.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/16/2007 12:32:01 December 16, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM's process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Karen Johnson
83 Wood St apt 1
Lewiston, ME 04240
USA
mogen70@yahoo.com


EM-1765 "Sue Wolling" <bicycle@efn.org> Public Comment on Western Oregon Plan Revisions 12/16/2007 14:27:48 Public Comments
BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions
P.O. Box 2965
Portland, OR  97208
 
    I have reviewed the various Action Alternatives of BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, and consider them a major step in the wrong direction.  The best way to ensure that our forests serve both present and future generations is to choose the "No Action" alternative.
 
    As the Northwest Forest Plan recognized, there is very little economic or environmental justification for logging Oregon's remaining old growth forests.  To have a sustained yield from any resource, one must spend only the interest, and not the principal.  Old growth forests are our "principal".  They hold a tremendous wealth of species and genetic diversity that represents the best hope for our forests to adapt to global climate change.  They sequester large amounts of moisture that helps protect against catastrophic fire.  They safeguard water quality and salmon habitat in our watersheds.  They provide a barrier to noxious and invasive species.  Finally, the development of many sawmills that have retooled to process smaller logs makes old growth unnecessary for economic stability.  Old growth is clearly the "principal" of our forest resource.
 
    The focus of forest management in BLM lands should be to derive economic benefit from the "interest" of our forests without liquidating the "principal".  The Siuslaw National Forest has recently shown how this be done by using thinning to gain marketable timber and provide jobs while also promoting the development of diverse, healthy forests with many of the characteristics of old growth. 
 
    The best way to serve the "mixed use" concept that BLM is charged to achieve is to protect the old growth while focusing management on restoring forest health in less ecologically valuable forest stands.  This calls for adopting the "Maintain Currest Management, No Action" alternative.
 
    Thank you for your attention to this critical issue.
 
Sincerely,
Susan C. Wolling
85219 S. Willamette
Eugene OR  97405
(541)345-2110
EM-1766 "Alicia Palmquist" <angelalicat@yahoo.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/16/2007 22:02:01 December 16, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management?s (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM?s process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM?s analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM?s legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness ? Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Alicia Palmquist
516 Atlantic Ave #2
Pittsburgh, PA 15221
USA
angelalicat@yahoo.com


EM-1767 "Margaret-Anne Morrison" <mamckibben@comcast.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/17/2007 4:02:01 December 17, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management�s (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas,
despite a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The
BLM�s process for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness
recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild
places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM�s analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM�s legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness � Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and
Coast Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Margaret-Anne Morrison
2612 Sample Road
Allison Park, PA 15101
USA
mamckibben@comcast.net


EM-1768 Heidi Kienia <hkienia@yahoo.com> Protect BLM Forests 12/17/2007 5:38:57 Bureau of Land Management
Oregon/Washington State Office
ATTN: Western Oregon Planning Revision (OR930.1)
PO Box 2965
Portland, Oregon 97208

Dear BLM,

Please accept these comments on the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am a citizen concerned with the management of these lands.

For the last ten years, the Bureau of Land Management administered forests in western Oregon under the Northwest Forest Plan. This ensured these forests continued to provide important public values. These forests can also provide jobs and wood products as a by-product of forest restoration such as thinning young plantation forests.

I am concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating may lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy. Many of these forests are currently protected for water quality, salmon and wildlife concerns.

Much of the BLM forests in western Oregon are adjacent to private landowners who would like to see nearby forest managed to protect their home from wildfire and to preserve their water supply, scenery, and recreation opportunities.

Please continue to protect the western BLM forests that are now protected.

Sincerely,

Heidi Kienia
#9 Second st.
Berwick, ME 03901
EM-1769 "S&N Killingsworth" <snkworth@gmail.com> Fw: WOPR 12/17/2007 7:34:09 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 12/17/2007 07:33 AM -----

"S&N Killingsworth" <snkworth@gmail.com>

12/16/2007 04:53 PM

To
Alan_Hoffmeister@blm.gov
cc

Subject
WOPR








Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue Portland, Oregon
Portland, OR 97208

CC: Oregon Congressional delegation

Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions

Dear BLM,

I am very concerned with the direction the Bush Administration is headed in with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of Oregon's federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and may lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

The Bush Administration's preferred alternative proposes to clear-cut 140,000 acres of Oregon's old-growth every decade, build 1,000 mile of new logging roads, and create over 100,000 miles of new Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas-all at the expense of roadless areas, threatened species, water quality and non-motorized recreation.

Most Americans want federal land managers to embrace thinning second growth forests, safeguard communities from wildfire and protect what remains of our nation's ancient forests. Indeed, many Oregon forest managers are already moving beyond the conflicts of the past. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - they are providing wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

In contrast, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clear-cutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at-risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clear-cut these natural treasures as the WOPR proposes to do.

It is disappointing that at a time when public consensus for old-growth protection and second-growth thinning has never been stronger, the BLM is proposing to clear-cut forests older than our nation and turn complex ecosystems into flammable tree farms.

Please protect remaining old-growth forests, focus active management of BLM lands in already logged-over areas, and concentrate job opportunities in restoration thinning projects that benefit watersheds and generate wood products without multiplying past mistakes.

Sincerely,

Serge Killingsworth
322 E Jessie St.
MT. Shasta, CA  96067
EM-1770 John D Calandrelli <connecticut.chapter@sierraclub.org> Protect BLM Forests 12/17/2007 7:55:07 Bureau of Land Management
Oregon/Washington State Office
ATTN: Western Oregon Planning Revision (OR930.1)
PO Box 2965
Portland, Oregon 97208

Dear BLM,

Please accept these comments on the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am a citizen concerned with the management of these lands.
Since when does the BLM stand for Bureau of Lumber Money? Either we haven't learned or don't care about the lessons of clearcuts in California. We don't need the lumber, neither does the rest of the world. I'm sick and tired of money being the measure of all.
No logging of old growth...period! I'm taking back my tax money. This conversation has ended...if there ever was one in the first place.



John D Calandrelli
645 Farmington Ave.
Hartford, CT 06105

860-236-4405
EM-1771 feldfour@hotmail.com Fw: WOPR Draft DEIS Information Request Form - Question Only 12/17/2007 9:00:21 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 12/17/2007 08:59 AM -----

feldfour@hotmail.com

12/14/2007 08:45 PM

To
orsowopr@blm.gov
cc

Subject
WOPR Draft DEIS Information Request Form - Question Only









Requestor: Joe Feldhaus

Street:

Location: , OR

E-mail address: feldfour@hotmail.com

Comments/Question: To whom it may concern,My famiy and I travel to the medford, OR area about once a year to ride our off road cycles in the johns peak and lake creek riding areas.  We strongly oppose the proposed elimination of orv/ohv vehicles in these and the other areas being considered.  We travel to your state from the Seattle area and enjoy these activities very much.  please leave the ohv designation for these areas as is.Sincerely,Joe Feldhaus103 182nd st swBothell, WA 98012425-386-3432
EM-1772 alpine.const@earthlink.net Fw: WOPR Draft DEIS Information Request Form - Question Only 12/17/2007 9:01:01 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 12/17/2007 09:00 AM -----

alpine.const@earthlink.net

12/15/2007 05:39 AM

To
orsowopr@blm.gov
cc

Subject
WOPR Draft DEIS Information Request Form - Question Only









Requestor: Keith Brenenstuhl

Street: 14530 NE North Valley Road

Location: Newberg, OR 97132

E-mail address: alpine.const@earthlink.net

Comments/Question: I would just like to voice my concerns with the Western Oregon Plan Revision.  I represent the responsible side of offroad motorcycling and hope that our voice is being heard.  We are a family of four that ride regulary in several BLM designated riding areas.  We spend money in the communities surrounding these areas.  We want our voice to be heard during these plan revisions and hope that all offroad uses will be carefully considered.  Thank you for your time.
EM-1773 Robert Mutter <mutterworks@yahoo.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/17/2007 9:02:59 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Robert Mutter
12529 26th Ave NE
Seattle, WA 98125
EM-1774 "Eben Fodor" <eben@fodorandassociates.com> Comments on the WOPR 12/17/2007 9:27:03 Dear BLM,

 

I am writing to urge you to maintain all existing old growth forest. We have been logging non-renewable old growth in the Northwest in an unsustainable manner for 160 years. What little remains should not be touched. Instead, our timber industry should operate in a sustainable manner using "second growth" forests for all future needs.

 

The concept of "sustained yield" should be translated to mean sustainable forestry. Old growth logging is not sustainable and these remnant forests should be preserved for their enormous ecological value.

 

Thanks for considering my comments.

 

Eben Fodor

**************
Eben Fodor
394 East 32nd Ave
Eugene, OR  97405
541-345-8246
**************

 
EM-1775 jarvisflin@yahoo.com Fw: WOPR Draft DEIS Information Request Form - Electronic Copy Request 12/17/2007 9:46:54 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 12/17/2007 09:46 AM -----

jarvisflin@yahoo.com

12/17/2007 06:48 AM

To
orsowopr@blm.gov
cc

Subject
WOPR Draft DEIS Information Request Form - Electronic Copy Request









Requestor: Jason FLinders

Street: 5272 Lakeshore Dr.

Location: Selma, OR 97538

E-mail address: jarvisflin@yahoo.com

Requested Item: Electronic Draft EIS

Comments/Question: As much as I know about the OHV designated areas being considered near my house, the plan seems to be a good idea.I dont know if there is an underlying reason driving the mad rush to designate these areas as \OHV parks\ other than that of a way to bring in more revenue. I do hope that these areas will actually be OHV friendly areas, where as in Canada and in some other states in the US, there are ATV clubs and or four wheel drive clubs. These clubs usually have a tread lightly policy, keeping trash picked up, staying with in the designated trails, maintaining trails, etc.If managed properly it can become a very attractive area once overlooked.
EM-1776 "Caroline Pierce" <midnitewriter1@hotmail.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/17/2007 9:52:01 December 17, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management�s (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas,
despite a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The
BLM�s process for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness
recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild
places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM�s analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM�s legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness � Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and
Coast Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Caroline Pierce
3040 Springview Meadows Dr
NEOPIAN CENTRAL
Rocklin, CA 95677
USA
midnitewriter1@hotmail.com


EM-1777 Erika Rundiks <emrundiks@aol.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/17/2007 14:11:54 Dear BLM,
Our natural habitats must be protected. The cause and affect of natual habitat destruction will devestate all humans in the end. Do what is right for everyone and everything. Don't destroy nature. We have enough parking lots! See the value in our natual resources for everyone concerned.

Erika Rundiks
4200 Zuni St.
Denver, CO 80211
EM-1778 Timothy Hinkle <thinkle@wesleyan.edu> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/17/2007 15:16:54 Dear BLM,
I recently moved to Oregon for a variety of reasons, including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and old growth forest ecosystems on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy. I have been informed of these issues by OregonWild. I encourage you to thin areas already cut rather than recklessly destroying old growth forests that I want my children and grandchildren to enjoy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won't be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon's spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

Timothy Hinkle
185 E 24th Ave. #1
Eugene, OR 97405
EM-1779 Sean Brady <sa_brady@comcast.net> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/17/2007 21:03:53 Dear BLM,
I am an avid fly-fisherman and hiker. Wilderness and wild place protect critical habitat for fish and wildlife. As a recent father, it is imperative that we manage our resources for the future, not just the present. We owe it to our chidlren and grandchildren to manager our resources responsibly. The best fishing and best hiking are in places that have been managed to protect fish and wildlife. Protecting streams and critical wildlife habitat should be our first priority for us and future generations.

I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Sean Brady
1124 E 14
Lafayette, OR 97127
EM-1780 Elaine Nelson <elaine_nelson47@yahoo.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/17/2007 21:18:17 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. Please protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Elaine Nelson
6786 SW 204th Ave.
Aloha, OR 97007
EM-1781 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/18/2007 10:11:38 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Alan Collins
PO Box 9321
Portland, OR 97207-9321
in_scapes65@hotmail.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1782 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/18/2007 10:12:33 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I have read the statement below and I agree with it.

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Jennifer Sargent
1921 SE 42nd Ave.
Portland, OR 97215
sargentjj@yahoo.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1783 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/18/2007 10:13:14 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


David Wilson
4350 Sunnybrook Road
Kent, Ohio, 44240
Daitheflu25@aol.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1784 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/18/2007 10:13:57 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Brandon Paul Jebediah Landis
704 NE 61st Ave
Portland, OR 97213
bpaulbusiness@gmail.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1785 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/18/2007 10:14:53 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Kylie Keppler
450 W 8th Ave #2
Eugene, OR 97401
ky87@aol.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1786 "Denee Scribner" <deneec@yahoo.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/18/2007 12:22:01 December 18, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management�s (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas,
despite a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The
BLM�s process for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness
recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild
places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM�s analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM�s legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness � Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and
Coast Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Denee Scribner
1113 E 2Nd Ave
Ellensburg, WA 98926
USA
deneec@yahoo.com


EM-1787 "Whitney Coleman" <stinkybojangles@cox.net> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/18/2007 18:32:01 December 18, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management�s (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas,
despite a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The
BLM�s process for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness
recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild
places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM�s analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM�s legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness � Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and
Coast Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Whitney Coleman
1479 Primrose dr.
El Cajon, CA 92020
USA
stinkybojangles@cox.net


EM-1788 Betty Jean Keele <bjkeele@epud.net> Comments on WOPR 12/19/2007 10:20:26 These are the same comments that are in the attachment. Wasn't sure if you
would be able to access the attachment. Its easier to read the attachement.
bj


Western Oregon Plans Revision (WOPR)
Comments by Betty Jean Keele
33485 Hampton Rd.
Eugene, Or, 97405


I support the North West Forest Plan (NWFP) Alternative or no the change
alternative. BLM¹s Preferred Alternative 2 has so many problems that I
feel it will never survive the legal challenges that it will have to endure.
The other alternatives do not change the problems that I see in the WOPR.

* Cutting the protection of the water by halving the riparian zone is not a
viable alternative.
* Some of the fish are just now starting to show some recovery since the
NWFP was put into place. Let the fish recovery continue.
* Halving the riparian zones also means there are no natural corridors to
allow owls or other wildlife to travel from one habitat to the next.
* And clear cutting on the slopes with little stream protection will surely
cut water quality for the many small and not so small communities that get
their water supply from the streams. Dirty water is very expensive to the
communities.

* The appeal of the 9th Circuit Courts of Appeals ruling that the Aquatic
Conservation Strategy of the NWForest Plan was withdrawn. This continues to
provide protection for Salmon streams. Alternative 2 may not be in
compliance with the Aquatic Conservation Strategy.

* Clear Cutting or Regenerative Cutting has been shown to be very
detrimental to the forests health.
* It means all the regrowth is the same size and often the same type of
tree which provides an easy dinner for whatever species of bug or disease
happens to like nice young tender trees.
* It means the same size stands are easy to burn, no large trees to resist
the fire.
* It means the plants and animals that need a varied forest size are
without habitat.
* Clear cutting has shown to increase habitat for invasive species.
* It causes more flooding, slides and erosion than selective or thinning
logging practices. Some terrible examples were the early Dec. 2007
flooding and slides that may have been made worse by Weyerhaeuser clear
cutting on steep slopes in the Chehalis, Wash and by OSU¹s clear cutting
near HWY 30. Both of these entities felt they had studied the slopes but
both had slope failures.
* The Spotted owl and Marble Murrelet cannot live in clear-cuts. Both as
endangered need all the protection possible.

* There is no owl activity centers retained in any of the alternatives.
This is critical to expanded owl populations.

* No green trees left after regenerative cutting means there is absolutely
no large trees left for animal habitat or natural reseeding.

* Increased ATV activity as proposed in Alternative 2 in the Ashland area
without proper public input or even adjacent neighbor input is sure to bring
law suites.

* Recreation is not recognized for its economic value to the areas where
expanded logging has been proposed. The economic value of coastal and
forest beauty can be seen by the influx of second homes, Florence as the
best place in the US to retire, and the raising value of properties
especially view properties. These are some of the same communities that
have had a depressed logging industry. The economic bases change with
changes in demographic makeup in the communities.

* Salvage logging is allowed in all Alternatives. In my opinion, if logging
was not allowed in an area before the catastrophic event, it should not be
allowed after the event. Its too easy for nefarious activities to burn a
forest to allow cutting. And if Salvage logging is allowed it should never
be allowed in trees that are healthy. The Prescription for cutting should
be specific about what could be cut.



- WOPR-Comments.doc
EM-1789 "Denise Horning" <dah309@pennswoods.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/19/2007 10:52:01 December 19, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management�s (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas,
despite a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The
BLM�s process for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness
recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild
places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM�s analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM�s legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness � Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and
Coast Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Denise Horning
309 North Street
Meyersdale, PA 15552
USA
dah309@pennswoods.net


EM-1790 "Fumiko Sakoda" <wolffirst@hotmail.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/19/2007 17:12:01 December 19, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management s (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM s process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM s analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM s legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Fumiko Sakoda
PO Box 104
Rosston, OK 73855-0104
USA
wolffirst@hotmail.com


EM-1791 "gary christensen" <gchris36@yahoo.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/20/2007 6:02:01 December 20, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management?s (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM?s process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM?s analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM?s legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness ? Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

gary christensen
PO Box 308
Springerville, AZ 85938-0308
USA
gchris36@yahoo.com


EM-1792 lawjsw@charter.net Fw: WOPR Draft DEIS Information Request Form - Question Only 12/20/2007 7:40:54 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 12/20/2007 07:40 AM -----

lawjsw@charter.net

12/19/2007 07:29 PM

To
orsowopr@blm.gov
cc

Subject
WOPR Draft DEIS Information Request Form - Question Only









Requestor: Scott wilson

Street: 1904 sw G st

Location: Grants Pass, OR 97526

E-mail address: lawjsw@charter.net

Comments/Question: Sir, I hope I\m in the right place to sumbmit my comments on the Johns Peak proposed closure. I am a motorcycle rider and feel that this is one of the few places left to openly ride and enjoy this type of recreation. This is a place to teach my kids hoe to handle a bike,with the current state of fuel prices I think more poaple will turn to street bike riding and dirt riding is the best way to learn how to ride so that when they do get an endorsement to ride on the street they know how to ride. Riders also contribute to communities in terms of dollars spent on equipment food etc, and what a great way to keep your kids of drugs and out of trouble.I hope you will look at both sides of this issue . Bottom line is riders need a place to ride. Thanks in advance for your timeScott wilsonlawjsw@charter.net
EM-1793 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/20/2007 16:09:35 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Steve Geiger
4804 SE Knapp st.
Portland Oregon 97206
stevethegreen@riseup.net
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1794 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/20/2007 16:10:10 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


dan kelley
112 ring st.
providence, ri 02909
organic_matters@yahoo.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1795 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/20/2007 16:10:55 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

This are is my home. It is so incredibly special. I know that there
are other viable solutions to logging this area. Let's work together
to find them.

Sincerely,


Aaron Derwingson
1228 Polk St
Eugene, OR 97402
derwingson@gmail.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1796 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/20/2007 16:11:48 Dear BLM guys,

How about if you LEAVE OUR OLD GROWTH FORESTS ALONE!

Logging doesn't belong there.


Teena Hubbard
20565 Conifer Ave
Bend, OR 97702
teenahubbard@earthlink.net
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1797 "Kit Kirkpatrick" <kitkirkpatrick@gmail.com> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision 12/20/2007 17:06:12 To Whom it may concern:
 
The Western Oregon Plan Revision will not be a prudent way to manage the forests of western Oregon for many reasons.  Taking the older trees that grace the coastal mountains will make the survival of the spotted owl and the marbled murrelet even more precarious.  The forests of western Oregon provide cover for countless other animals and their welfare should be considered paramount.  The trees keep our watersheds healthy and our water clean.  Recently we have seen how even a 10-year rain event can cause major landslides in areas that have been clearcut.  Those slides foul the water and damage public works and private property and at worst can put human lives at risk.  The 1000 miles of extra roads that will have to be built to forward the Plan are sure to further damage the streams and threaten to precipitate more landslides.
 
 The older and larger trees in Oregon's forests sequester carbon dioxide at a rate that serves to stave off global warming.  The animal habitat and clean water that they make possible encourages tourism in the state bringing much needed revenue.  Healthy, mature forests ensure that our children will have a more secure future in a cleaner environment.
 
Naturally there are alternatives to the wholesale logging of the oldest trees in the Coast Range.  The Willamette and Umpqua National Forests are advancing massive plantation-thinning projects that are creating jobs and restoring degraded landscapes.  Those smaller-diameter logs are providing income for the county governments as well.  There is no reason that such a model could not be replicated in the forests of the coastal mountains as well.  
 
I believe that the funding gap in Oregon counties dependent on logging revenues must be filled by our federal government, as every landowner must do his part to defray the costs of maintaining the county services. The US Government is, of course, short on cash, thanks to its unpopular foray into the realm of  unending wars and unspeakable horrors.  I suggest that our government extricate itself from the dirty wars and focus on the needs of its people and the environment in the United States.
 
Sincerely, Kit D. Kirkpatrick
 
 
EM-1798 Tamera Campbell <tamerac@e3live.com> Fw: Oregon's forests - Western Plan for Old Growth Trees 12/21/2007 9:04:18 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 12/21/2007 09:03 AM -----

"Tamera Campbell" <tamerac@e3live.com>

12/21/2007 07:39 AM

To
<alan_hoffmeister@blm.gov>
cc

Subject
Oregon's forests - Western Plan for Old Growth Trees








Dear Mr. Hoffmeister,

This letter is to let you know that we adamantly disagree with the harvesting of the remaining old growth trees in our beautiful state.  If we want to look
like all the other states in our nation, we are headed that way.   Oregon is pristine, nature, bountiful, and why should we ruin that forever?  For the money?
Who benefits?  A few select.  We as citizens are NOT interested in anything other than to protect our trees and our future beautification of Oregon.
Leave things alone.  Harvest the trees that were planted for that purpose and leave our streams, our earth and our trees they way it is in these precious
remaining areas.  I've lived here all my life, as has my family, and I have seen tremendous destruction and devastation of some forests which were not managed correctly, and I've seen beautiful forests which have been allowed to remain in place, untouched.  We cherish our old growth timber and one day it will be the only remaining old growth in the USA, and it will bring tourism and long term dollars....not short term dollars to a select few people!!!!!!

I lost my job to the decline of available timber in Oregon.  My husband lost his job, as did many of our family and friends.  But we adjusted and we made
our living somewhere else.  I understand the need for timber, I understand forest management, I understand a lot about it.  Would anyone go cut down the Redwood Forest?  Maybe if someone thought there was enough financial gain.  And this is what I see in this situation.  Only financial gain for a few select.

So Leave our Old Growth Forests Alone!  Please!  

I have a better idea, why don't we put this on the Oregon ballet and see what people really want?  Not leave it up to a select few people in a government position with power to ruin what others cherish deeply.

Sincerely,

Tamera Campbell
CEO
Michael Saiber
President

Tamera Campbell
Vision
P.O. Box N
Klamath Falls, OR  97601
Off. 541-273-2212
Fax 541-273-9213
cell:  310-908-3535
http://www.E3Live.com <http://www.e3live.com/>

EM-1799 joan morin <jomojole@yahoo.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/21/2007 12:26:54 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

We must start making decisions that ensure the health and vitality of our forests, wildlife and future.

joan morin
25358 cherry creek road
monroe, OR 97456
EM-1800 Donald Aulenbach <aulied@juno.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/21/2007 14:08:14 Dear BLM,
Our son lives near Monroe, Oregon. We try to visit him once a year, but as we get older, that becomes somewhat more difficult. He enjoys hiking, and when we visit him he likes to take us hiking and show us some of the unique beauty spots in Oregon. This includes the old-growth forests near Alsea Falls. While there we are always impressed with the huge old-growth trees that have existed there for centuries. Now he advises us that there are plans to destroy these sentinels for the benefit of the logging industry. (Our President seems to have a habit of acquiescing to industry in return for its support, monetarily or otherwise.) To me, these trees standing are much more imortant than the lumber, paper, or energy that can be derived from them. It can take hundreds of years to regrow them, not until my great-great-great grandchildren will they reach their present stature. Meanwhile they may never see the great productivity of an old-growth forest.

You may say the wood is more valuable in dollars than leaving the trees to stand so that future generations may be awed by them. But how can you put a dollar mark on such a treasure? Would you support tearing down the Washington Monument because the stone is worth more than just an obelisk that is not even bringing in any money; actually costing for maintenance? There are some things that have more value remaining just as they are. I consider old-growth trees in this category.

In addition to losing these stately trees, one must consider the impact on the environment. I taught Environmental Engineering for 30 years at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Forests are an important part of our environment. Standing forests hold back runoff from rainfall, lessening floods and preventing landslides. Removing trees allows more sediment to be carried to streams, thereby clogging them and causing greater flooding. Trees absorb nutrients and prevent them from being carried into streams where they can support excessive algal growths. When you add all the indirect benefits of forests, you might find that their standing value is greater than their value as wood.

I could go on for the rest of this 50-minute lecture, but I know you will soon tire of my admonitions. So I will close by entreating you to reconsider your ideas for destroying the few old-growth forests left in Oregon. I am sure that if you look at the total picture you will see that they are worth more as standing forests than the one-time monetary value to the lumber industry.

Donald B. Aulenbach, PhD, P.E., BCEE, P.H.







Donald Aulenbach
28 Valencia Lane
Clifton Park, NY 12065
EM-1801 CN=Alan Hoffmeister/OU=ORSO/OU=OR/OU=BLM/O=DOI Fw: WOPR 12/21/2007 14:59:59 ----- Forwarded by Alan Hoffmeister/ORSO/OR/BLM/DOI on 12/21/2007 02:59 PM -----
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Bill Mordan <mordanwj@earthlink.net>
Date: Dec 21, 2007 12:48 PM
Subject: WOPR
To: info@daylightdecisions.com


Please review and amend the WOPR to protect all mature and old-growth
forests from clearcutting and leave them for future generations to
enjoy,
to continue to protect threatened and endangered species such as the
marbled murrelet and the Northern spotted owl,
to promote forest restoration rather than  intensive industrial
logging. Develop sustainable forestry rather than clearcuttingadn to
protect trout, salmon and clean water by shielding watersheds, rivers
and streams from sedimentation and temperature changes.

William Mordan
3022 Cameron Way
Santa Clara, CA 95051
EM-1802 Nancy <Nancfritz@cox.net> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 12/21/2007 16:09:07  
I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks.

Sincerely,

YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS
EM-1803 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/21/2007 16:58:53 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Chris Breecher
543 Vista Flora Newport Beach, CA, 92660
breecherm@aol.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1804 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/21/2007 16:59:29 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,

Mayo Finch
Mayo Finch
434 E 13th #2
Eugene, OR 97401
mayofinch@yahoo.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1805 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/21/2007 17:00:14 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Jacob Ritley
35551 Hood Canal Dr. NE
Hansville, WA 98340
jacobritley@gmail.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1806 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/21/2007 17:01:13 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Mark Rutherford
124 Sunshine Acres Dr.
Eugene, OR 97401
rutherfordmark@yahoo.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1807 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/21/2007 17:01:53 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Heather Buley
1282 Monroe St.
Eugene, OR 97402
heatherbuley@yahoo.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1808 Morgan Heckman <moheckman@yahoo.com> Protect BLM Forests 12/21/2007 21:50:35 Bureau of Land Management
Oregon/Washington State Office
ATTN: Western Oregon Planning Revision (OR930.1)
PO Box 2965
Portland, Oregon 97208

Dear BLM,

Please accept these comments on the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am a citizen concerned with the management of these lands.

For the last ten years, the Bureau of Land Management administered forests in western Oregon under the Northwest Forest Plan. This ensured these forests continued to provide important public values. These forests can also provide jobs and wood products as a by-product of forest restoration such as thinning young plantation forests.

I am concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating may lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy. Many of these forests are currently protected for water quality, salmon and wildlife concerns.

Much of the BLM forests in western Oregon are adjacent to private landowners who would like to see nearby forest managed to protect their home from wildfire and to preserve their water supply, scenery, and recreation opportunities.

Please continue to protect the western BLM forests that are now protected.

Sincerely,

Morgan Heckman
2306 N. Kilpatrick
Portland, OR 97217
EM-1809 Cheryl Vallone <clvallone@aol.com> Comments on the Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process 12/22/2007 19:02:01 December 22, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to respectfully urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas
that should be recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR).
The Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five
areas, despite a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan.
The BLM's process for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness
recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild
places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM's analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM's legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness - Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared.

I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations in the WOPR and to expand
the recommendations to include the wild places listed above that should be managed
to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Thank you for your consideration and for accepting these comments.

Sincerely,

Cheryl Vallone
10 Ivy Ln
Ashland, MA 01721-1020
USA
clvallone@aol.com


EM-1810 Diana Wales <dwales@jeffnet.org> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/23/2007 17:06:40 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Diana Wales
215 LaDonna Lane
Roseburg, OR 97470
EM-1811 Gene R. Trapp & Jo Ellen <grtrapp@comcast.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/23/2007 22:42:01 December 23, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management�s (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas,
despite a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The
BLM�s process for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness
recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild
places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM�s analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM�s legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness � Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and
Coast Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Gene R. Trapp & Jo Ellen
2313 Isle Royale Lane
Davis, CA 95616
USA
grtrapp@comcast.net


EM-1812 Jerry Bobbe <jbobbe@comcast.net> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 12/24/2007 9:06:31 I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest being horribly "managed" by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM, an anti-life crony organization of the killers Bush and Cheney) in Oregon. The BLM, a phony subsidiary of the Bush Crime Family, is moving forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision (a bullshit title which means their intended utter destruction of the natural environment of our state while they steal everything; similar to their deadly and sick Iraqi plan), which will increase logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks.  Please understand that if we allow this, they will not stop their senseless destruction until everything is dead and gone, and they are safely in Dubaicounting their precious stolen money.

On a daily basis, the sociopathic Bush Crime Family is revealing their horrific and maniacal end-of-the-world behavior to the citizens of Americaand our planet.  We here in the Northwest must stop them on every front, especially when considering the future of our once pristine environment.  If necessary, these monstrous criminals must be kept out of our state with force, as now that their loyal stooges have sworn allegiance to the criminal family, no good can possibly come from any of their actions.  Nothing from the Bush Crime Family could ever benefit Oregon, or anyone in it. 

We simply must stop Bush and his killers, just as we would any thief or murderer who might attempt senseless criminal behavior where we live.  We must all be very strong in the next year.  It is a critically dangerous time for our species and planet.

Sincerely,

Jerry Bobbe

PO Box25817

Portland, OR97298
EM-1813 Bobbee Murr <bobbeemurr@mac.com> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 12/24/2007 10:08:35 Protect our commonwealth and natural heritage -- no cutting in public
lands. Work for the people and nature, not corporations.

Sincerely,
Bobbee Murr
31 NW 22d Pl
Portland, OR 97210
EM-1814 Sylvan <sylvan@spiritone.com> Stop the Western Oregon Plan Revisions - BLM Forests are forests, too! 12/24/2007 12:57:07 I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks. As a result, I do not support the agency's 'preferred alternative' and urge you to instead select the 'no action' alternative or abandon the current planning process.

The BLM needs to be responsive to the broader public who uses these landsfor recreation, drinking water, hunting, and fishing and to those who derive economic value from greater protection for these forests and rivers and wild salmon.

The BLM should not remove its forests in western Oregonfrom the scientific framework of the Northwest Forest Plan in order to increase logging and clearcutting. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, many rivers in western Oregondo not meet basic water quality standards, and further clearcut logging combined with less protection for streamside areas will undermine improvements to water quality seen since the adoption of the Northwest Forest Plan in 1994.

Here are a few of the main reasons the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revision is flawed:

. Clean water - Oregon's wild rivers provide critical habitat for salmon, steelhead and trout, as well as recreational opportunities and drinking water. This is a legacy we should be improving and passing on to future generations. Under the BLM's proposal, water quality in many of Oregon's rivers ands streams would be degraded as current riparian protections are abandoned in order to increase logging.

. Global warming - Ancient forests on BLM land in western Oregonsequester tremendous amounts of carbon dioxide annually, helping to mitigate global warming. The loss of these forests from increased clearcutting and roadbuilding would release massive amounts of CO2 into the atmosphere.

. Fire risk - The BLM's plans would increase fire risk and severity as healthy stands of fire-resistant old growth trees are converted into dense, flammable tree plantations full of logging slash.

Again, I urge you to abandon efforts to increase logging of old growth forests on BLM lands in Oregon, and instead seek ways to provide greater protection for forests, streams, fish and wildlife, while identifying and investing in ways to create new jobs in restoring the damage from past decades of over-logging and road-building.

Sincerely,

Sylvan Thompson
6502 SE 17th Ave
Portland OR 97202

EM-1815 Jenny McGhehey <saladbar7@msn.com> Western Oregon Plan Revision Comments 12/24/2007 13:25:05  
 

To Whom It May Concern: 

 

As a longtime resident of Oregon, I am concerned about the Bureau of Land Management's proposal to increase logging as a way to help fund our county services and public schools.  This seems to me to be a very short-sighted approach since the harvesting of particularly older and mature trees is not a resource that can be quickly replaced.  The following are additional concerns I have regarding any changes to our current forest management plan. 

 

Oregon mills have been faced with the reduction of old growth logs to harvest for the past number of years, and as a result, they have adapted their machinery and techniques to working with smaller diameter trees and be able to still return a profit. We should continue to thin and harvest smaller, younger trees for commercial use.   

 

The removal of our older growth trees will further reduce the habitat for both the marbled murrelet and northern spotted owl both of which have already been negatively impacted by past timber harvesting.

 

New road building to allow access for the removal of more timber will likely cause erosion, possible slides and sediment buildup in our waterways.  The increase in sediment in our rivers and streams along with a rise in water temperatures from additional loss of the tree canopy will result in lower salmon populations. 

 

Increased timber harvest will improve the conditions for the introduction and spread of invasive plants and hasten the decline of valuable native plants, lichen and fungi.  In addition, herbicide spraying may be used more heavily in logged areas to try to control the growth of weeds.  This further increases the chance for contamination of our waterways and groundwater supplies.

 

In light of the global warming crises, should our state begin to increase the harvest of Oregonforests and, therefore, knowingly contribute to the problem?   Oregonhas long been a leader in promoting environmental awareness and protection of its natural resources.  Our state is known for its natural beauty and recreational opportunities, and tourism is an important economic factor.  A decline in tourism would be likely due to the negative visual impact as well as publicity from the media.  I strongly urge the BLM to continue to follow the current forest management plan and take no alternative action.

 

Sincerely,

 

Jenny McGhehey

Marcola, Oregon      

 

      .      .   
EM-1816 Jane Olson <tigercat4@gmail.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/24/2007 18:12:01 December 24, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management�s (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas,
despite a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The
BLM�s process for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness
recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild
places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM�s analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM�s legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness � Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and
Coast Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Jane Olson
2025 Sage Lily Dr
Sidney, MT 59270
USA
tigercat4@gmail.com


EM-1817 Tom Taber <hikertom@sbcglobal.net> Protect our old-growth forests 12/24/2007 18:36:54 BLM:
My sister, who lives in Florence, Oregon, and I went camping and hiking last summer in the Oregon Coast Range. I was appalled by the extent of clearcutting in this area and how little is left of your state's magnificent old-growth forests. There is no comparison between old-growth forests and the tree farms that replace them.
 
I am strongly opposed to the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR) plan to allow destruction of some of the few remaining old-growth forests in Oregon.
 
Please protect all the old-growth forests in the Northwest Forest Plan reserve system.
 
Sincerely,
Tom Taber
1643 Fillmore Avenue
San Mateo, CA 94403
(650)574-4470
hikertom@sbcglobal.net
 
 
 
EM-1818 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/24/2007 19:10:22 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Vonda Welty
4096 E 17th/PO Box 3266
Eugene OR 97403-0266
vwelty@uoregon.edu

--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1819 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/24/2007 19:11:04 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Name: Kara Leonard
Street: 860 NW Van Buren Ave. Apt. 2
City,_State,_Zip: Corvallis, OR 97330
Email_Address: kara.leonard@gmail.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1820 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/24/2007 19:11:46 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am opposed to the elimination of old-growth and streamside reserves
on western Oregon BLM lands. These forests provide habitat for many
wildlife species, clean drinking water to rural communities,
recreation for outdoor enthusiasts, and a legacy for future
generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Do not open older
forests on our public lands to logging. There is simply no need to.

Sincerely,


Name: Ryan Talbott
Street: 2805 SE Franklin Street
City,_State,_Zip: Portland, OR 97202
Email_Address: rtalbott@alleghenydefense.org
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1821 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/24/2007 19:12:16 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Name: Judyth Hyll
Street: 3795 Wilshire Lane
City,_State,_Zip: Eugene, OR 97405
Email_Address: Judythhyll@yahoo.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1822 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/24/2007 19:12:40 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Name: Jeannette Lawrence
Street: 81821 Lost Valley Lane
City,_State,_Zip: Dexer, OR 97431
Email_Address: gjlaw@efn.org
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1823 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/24/2007 19:13:18 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Name: Paul Cziko
Street: 1355 Bailey Ave.
City,_State,_Zip: Eugene, OR 97402
Email_Address: pcziko@gmail.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1824 Kathleen Cole <crazymonkey@wildglobe.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/25/2007 4:02:01 December 25, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management?s (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM?s process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM?s analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM?s legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness ? Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Kathleen Cole
16404 Florence Chapel Pike
Circleville, OH 43113-9553
USA
crazymonkey@wildglobe.com


EM-1825 Lauri Peacock <Peacockalante@juno.com> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/25/2007 5:32:01 December 25, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management�s (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas,
despite a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The
BLM�s process for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness
recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild
places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM�s analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM�s legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness � Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and
Coast Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Lauri Peacock
718 N Burk St
Hobbs, NM 88240-4936
USA
Peacockalante@juno.com


EM-1826 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/25/2007 11:06:15 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Name: Gwen Wolfram
Street: 1525 NW 23rd Street
City,_State,_Zip: Corvallis, OR 97330
Email_Address: gewolfram@yahoo.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1827 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/25/2007 11:06:37 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Name: Jessica Rojas
Street: 1282alton DR
City,_State,_Zip: Eugene OR 97404
Email_Address: xuyroja@yahoo.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1828 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/25/2007 11:07:22 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Name: Dione Armand
Street: 2250 Patterson St
City,_State,_Zip: Eugene, OR 97405
Email_Address: dionear@gmail.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1829 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/25/2007 11:07:49 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Name: Stuart Phillips
Street: 212 Benjamin
City,_State,_Zip: Eugene, Or. 97404
Email_Address: stulips@hotmail.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1830 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/25/2007 11:08:12 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

This kind of short-sighted decision making hurts everyone in the long
run. These old growth forests cannot be replaced, not in our
lifetime. I truly feel it would be a tragedy to destroy them, and
really for what? A little money, compared to the devastating impact
such a loss would mean to so many?

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Name: Bruce Bunderson
Street: 23426 Caminito Flecha
City,_State,_Zip: Laguna Hills, CA 92653
Email_Address: brucebunderson@yahoo.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1831 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/25/2007 11:08:39 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Name: Sara Pritt
Street: 343 W. 16th Ave.
City,_State,_Zip: Eugene, OR 97401
Email_Address: winds4sw@yahoo.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1832 Claire Watson <sorchasibeal@sbcglobal.net> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/25/2007 20:32:01 December 25, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management?s (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM?s process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM?s analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM?s legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness ? Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Claire Watson
246 Peppertree Way
Pittsburg, CA 94565
USA
sorchasibeal@sbcglobal.net


EM-1833 Jim & Dana Belisle <dananjim@peak.org> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 12/26/2007 9:46:57  
I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks.

Sincerely,
Dana Belisle
3811 NW 25th Ave.
Albany, OR 97321
EM-1834 Christopher <daymaker@essentiallivingfoods.com> WOPR RULING JAN 11th - CRITICAL MASS DECLINES RULING 12/26/2007 11:02:31 Alan:

Hope you had a great Holiday & Happy New Years! This matter is far reaching and I pray our words are heard. 


Our old growth forests are the most valuable national treasure we have.  It is absolutely unacceptable to me that our government would even consider allowing these national treasures to be destroyed by the logging industry.  You must do everything in your power to stop this immediately.  The nation depends on you and more importantly, the health of this planet depends on you.  Do not fail in this greater obligation to all of existence -- certain corporate entities do not understand that profits are of no value in a world destroyed by global warming and resource elimination.  A brutally short-sighted decision to destroy our longest term national contributors is a failure of incalculable proportions. 

Embrace these forests as a part of your legacy of preservation and restoration rather than allow your legacy to be one of degradation and destruction. 

I pray that you have the strength to stand up to those who do not understand.  I pray that you accept this challenge. 

Sincerely,

Dr. Christopher Daugherty

Founder & Chairman

BeOn Holdings Inc. & ELF Inc.

& Concerned Ashland Citizen

  - _Remaining-Forests.jpg - _Operation-Clearcutter.jpg
EM-1835 Arnie & Katie <mountnhigh@bmi.net> wopr 12/26/2007 11:32:43 I     As a concerned citizen I am opposed to BLM's efforts to revise the current management plan.I'm an avid hiker and see remote areas during all seasons and as beautiful as Oregon is,there are appalling activities already taking place.Forests that have been logged are left looking as if a bomb has occurred,motor cycles on hiking trails(in spite of signs),as well as atv's.These motorized environmental terrorists tare through creeks, and have so much more fun if they can check the limits of their vehicle by going in areas where no vehicle has been before.It is mind boggling how deep into the pristine forest these guy's can get to.It was last Feb.07.,we were on red dog trail here came a motor cycle that sounded like a train.He said he was from Bandon and rides frequently in this area.(thru creeks,and any where he can).We see evidence of this activity every where.Briggs Creek,some men who were camped  for mining had atvs and sat in the middle of the creek with their filth vehicles to wash and cool off.We had a conversation with them they think nothing of this.We live on property  that borders blm,currently it has become a motorized play ground for another border property owner.The meadows are unrecognizable he has torn thru creeks and made obstacle courses for himself.So ,you are the professional,right? Considering that, I assume your organization has the best interest for our land as your internal compass for making decisions! When you give people an inch they will take a mile.The forests are already in need of repair.Why open up a new avenue AVENUE , I said , for these people who think that Oregon has such vast amount of land ,why not use it for land fill(Yes ,refrigerator,T.V.s,mattress all matter of trash).I came to Oregon in the 70's, and realize time marches on but,if those decision makers can't see the forest for the trees what will happen to our great state?Please take this personal.We are common people that are out in the forest and see first hand on a regular basis what is happening.Now it's in our back yard literally. Do you see very many people driving the speed limit on the freeway?That is what this revision will do!
 
 
                                                                 Thank you,
                                                                  Katie Mount
                                                                  530 Ewe Cr. Rd.
                                                                  Grants Pass Or.97526
                                                                   5414710871
EM-1836 Corwin DiMeo-Ediger <corwinjde@gmail.com> Western Oregon Plan Revision 12/26/2007 12:24:06  
I am very concerned about the Western Oregon plan revision for the BLM in Oregon. Please, please, reconsider this revision.
We are a unique state! Please do not betray the environment that sets us apart!

Sincerely,

Corwin DiMeo-Ediger
EM-1837 Elvira Floran-Bernier <elvira80304@gmail.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/26/2007 15:52:01 December 26, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management�s (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas,
despite a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The
BLM�s process for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness
recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild
places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM�s analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM�s legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness � Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and
Coast Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Elvira Floran-Bernier
4500 19th St Lot 386
Boulder, CO 80304-0663
USA
elvira80304@gmail.com


EM-1838 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/26/2007 17:29:02 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Name: Marshell Woodgates
Street: 4620 Tripp Ln
City,_State,_Zip: Stevensville MT 59870
Email_Address: melainw@hotmail.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1839 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/26/2007 17:29:35 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations. As a part time OTR
driver, I have occasions to be in these woods so I would like to see
them protected so I can continue to enjoy them.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.
Also paper can be made from so many things that it hardly seems
justifiable to be cutting down these big trees just to make paper.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Name: Doug Goodall
Street: PO Box 6567
City,_State,_Zip: Reno, NV 89513
Email_Address: sunandsage@wwdb.org
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1840 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/26/2007 17:30:14 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

This is my second letter regarding the Western
Oregon Plan Revision, which I am strongly opposed
to. Your response to me was disappointing as it
minimized my concerns and the reality of the
impacts that increasing clear-cutting 700% of our
irreplaceable old growth forest would bring.

I was pleased to hear that the record will be
held open until January 11th 2008 given that some
revealing news has surfaced (thanks to Senator
Ron Wyden) regarding the Bush administration
officials in 2004 overruled federal scientists,
determining that marbled murrelets in the
Northwest did not need protection under the
Endangered Species Act because plenty of the
murrelets remain in Canada and Alaska. This is
absolutely absurd logic not to mention callous
and insensitive to Oregonís endangered wildlife
population.

Former deputy assistant secretary of fish,
wildlife and parks, Julie MacDonald is under
investigation for altering scientific findings
and bullying biologist. This is not the first
time that biologist and scientist have been
bullied under the Bush administration. Also under
investigation is a series of misconduct committed
by Interior Department officials which include
bribery.

With respect to the ongoing investigations in the
scandalous and corrupt performance of these
officials I think it prudent for the BLM to
discontinue any action to move forward with the
WOPR as it was created with manipulated
information, corruption and lies. I would think
that if BLM were to move forward with the WOPR
then BLM would be held accountable in this case
of criminal activity.

These forests provide habitat for many wildlife
species, clean drinking water to rural
communities, recreation for outdoor enthusiasts,
and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is
critical that we protect them for future
generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for
generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public
lands to logging. We need to move in opposite
direction in order to live more sustain-ably
rather than less.

Sincerely,


Name: Lisa Warnes
Street: 5020 Nectar Way
City,_State,_Zip: Eugene, OR. 97405
Email_Address: lisawarnes@efn.org
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to
defending the forests, waters, and wildlife of
the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org to
learn more about wildlands issues and our
leadership in the conservation movement. Become a
member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support
makes a difference!
EM-1841 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/26/2007 17:30:43 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Name: Karrie Lange
Street: 1512 Camino Del Oro
City,_State,_Zip: Yuba City, CA 95993
Email_Address: rainforests1st@yahoo.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1842 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/26/2007 17:31:15 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Name: Isaac McCoy-Sulentic
Street: 1355 Bailey Ave
City,_State,_Zip: Eugene, OR 97402
Email_Address: imccoysulent@yahoo.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1843 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/26/2007 17:31:53 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Name: Roy Ahl
Street: 161 W Hilliard, Eugene Or. 97404
Email_Address: akdmann@yahoo.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1844 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 12/26/2007 17:32:20 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Name: Anne Mann
Street: 161 W Hilliard, Eugene Or. 97404
Email_Address: akdmann@yahoo.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1845 Hedy Lou <hedylou@charter.net> Old growth 12/26/2007 19:55:49 Let's just take the old growth off the table.   No "harvesting" of old growth -- it can never be replaced.   As for the other 98% of the forest -- that's negotiable.   The old growth is not.   I'm not anti-logging.   Just anti-logging of the tiny bit of old growth that still remains.
 
Hedy Schoonover
P.O. Box 323
Jacksonville, OR 97530
541 899-6903
EM-1846 trout <troutmask420@hotmail.com> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 12/26/2007 22:21:48  
I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks.

Sincerely,

Rev. Jim Dancing Trout
EM-1847 Paul and Nancy Cooke <nancooke@peak.org> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 12/27/2007 12:18:44 We are very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by
the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving
forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase
logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in
currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon
bearing rivers and creeks.

We live adjacent to a BLM tract in western Oregon and there are
several old growth trees that help anchor the soils on these steep
slopes. Removal of these trees would be damaging to the creek that
runs below this area and encourage soil erosion. Please later the
proposed plan to spare all the trees that area over 50 years of age.

Sincerely,

Paul Cooke
Nancy Cooke
19587 Alsea Hwy
Alsea, OR 97324
EM-1848 Jeffrey Thieret <jthieret@hotmail.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/27/2007 13:22:01 December 27, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management�s (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas,
despite a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The
BLM�s process for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness
recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild
places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM�s analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM�s legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness � Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and
Coast Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Jeffrey Thieret
2900 Kozy St
Stevens Point, WI 54481-5441
USA
jthieret@hotmail.com


EM-1849 Eric Jacoby <ericjacoby@earthlink.net> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision 12/27/2007 14:50:44 Eric Jacoby
2363 Mosquito Lake Road
Deming, WA 98244-9706


December 27, 2007

Edward Shepard
OR/WA State Director
Bureau of Land Management
PO Box 2965
Portland, OR 97208


Dear Edward Shepard:

Please accept the following comments on the BLM's Draft Environmental
Impact Statement for the Revision of the Resource Management Plans for
Western Oregon.

I firmly believe that timber production and wildlife protection are not
mutually exclusive policies. It is the federal government's obligation to
live up to the NWFP by moving forward with timber management strategies
that enhance rural economics and meet basic tenets of understood wildlife
needs. Please employ a plan that increases measurable benefits both to
the economies western states and their citizens dependant on rational
federal policy.

In summary, the economic viability of our rural communities and the
overall health of our federal forests are of vital importance to me. I
ask that you give these comments full consideration as you prepare the
final Environmental Impact Statement and select the final management plans
for the Western Oregon BLM Districts.

Sincerely,


Eric Jacoby
360-927-5763

EM-1850 R. Hudnut <roger_hudnut@northwestoutdoor.com> Stop WOPR - Protect our OLD GROWTH BLM forests 12/27/2007 15:55:21 To the BLM
I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks. 
 
I am not in favor of the WORP!  Old Growth is a treasure that should remain untuched.  Please leave these 2.6m acres of forest alone, for me, my friends, my state and for future generations.  These protected temperate forests are far to beautiful to cut up.  Please keep the natural habitat for water creatures and land dwelling creatures untouched.  Please allow mother nature to take her natural course and allow these protected tracks of land to develope and mature with out foresting or human tampering.
 
 

Sincerely,

Roger Hudnut
2055 SE 154th. Ave.
Portland, OR 97233
EM-1851 Mike Davis <mikedavis@hamptonaffiliates.com> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision 12/28/2007 4:57:04 Mike Davis
1655 S. Market Blvd. suite A
Chehalis, WA 98532-3826


December 28, 2007

Edward Shepard
OR/WA State Director
Bureau of Land Management
PO Box 2965
Portland, OR 97208


Dear Edward Shepard:

Please accept the following comments on the BLM's Draft Environmental
Impact Statement for the Revision of the Resource Management Plans for
Western Oregon.

None of the three alternatives presented in the DEIS meet the requirements
of the O&C Act because they do not manage the land for the dominant use of
timber production. Reserving the majority (52%) of the suitable
timberlands for the purpose of a listed species is contrary to the O&C Act.

Because of the unique nature of the O&C Lands, by law these lands are not
available to be part of a reserve system designed to recover a listed
species. The BLM should consider active management for the protection of
listed and sensitive species and their habitat before adopting passive,
reserve strategies. The alternative selected by the BLM, however, should
be one that will not jeopardize the continued existence of listed species
within the species entire habitat range.

The BLM must develop and analyzes at least one alternative that maximizes
the amount of land in timber production and receipts to local county
governments, and meets its no jeopardy obligation.

Congress and the Administration must ensure that when the Plan is
finalized that the BLM receives adequate funding so that it can be fully
implemented.

When implemented, the Plan should live up to the full commitment that was
made to local counties.

Timber sale revenues must generate at least an amount equal to the funding
that was provided to local counties through the Secure Rural Schools and
Community Self-Determination Act on a yearly basis.

All BLM administered land should be managed to minimize the threat of
catastrophic wildfire on these lands and surrounding state and private
lands.

Access should be maintained through BLM administered lands for private
land access, fire suppression, as well as recreational uses, such as
hunting, fishing, boating and sightseeing.

Access should be maintained through BLM administered lands for private
land access, fire suppression, as well as recreational uses, such as
hunting, fishing, boating and sightseeing.

In summary, the economic viability of our rural communities and the
overall health of our federal forests are of vital importance to me. I
ask that you give these comments full consideration as you prepare the
final Environmental Impact Statement and select the final management plans
for the Western Oregon BLM Districts.

Sincerely,


Mike Davis

EM-1852 Matthew Haskett <matthewhaskett@charter.net> Dismay 12/28/2007 7:47:59 I'm totally dismayed at the Bush administration's attempt to clearcut Oregon's forests. WOPR will increase the amount of acarbon in the atmosphere by converting moist old growth forests into dry flammable tree plantations, it will harm the economy, destroy habitat, and threaten peace and quiet. There are better ways!!

-- Matthew Haskett
EM-1853 Paul and Nancy Cooke <nancooke@peak.org> STOP WOPR-Protect BLM Forests 12/28/2007 8:26:02 We are very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by
the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving
forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase
logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in
currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon
bearing rivers and creeks.

We live adjacent to a BLM tract in western Oregon and there are
several old growth trees that help anchor the soils on these steep
slopes. Removal of these trees would be damaging to the creek that
runs below this area and encourage soil erosion. Please alter the
proposed plan to spare all the trees that are over 50 years of age.

Sincerely,

Paul Cooke
Nancy Cooke
19587 Alsea Hwy
Alsea, OR 97324
EM-1854 Julie Harris <moon.magick@verizon.net> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 12/28/2007 9:51:30 I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by the
Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving forward
with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in
Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in currently
protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers
and creeks.

Sincerely,
Julie Harris
3964 SW Dilley Road
Forest Grove, OR 97116

EM-1855 roy fuller <rfuller2@nycap.rr.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/28/2007 10:42:01 December 28, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management?s (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM?s process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM?s analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM?s legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness ? Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

roy fuller
PO Box 392
Caroga Lake, NY 12032-0392
USA
rfuller2@nycap.rr.com


EM-1856 Stan Jewett <stanjiii@verizon.net> Opposed to WOPR 12/28/2007 11:21:59 I strenuously object to the WOPR. The 2.6 million acres of forest at peril, which include old growth and streamside trees, are irreplaceable. Execution of the revised plan would forever destroy sources of clean water and habitat for many native species, including critical wild salmon.

The timber at issue is the property of the people of the United States, and the BLM is entrusted by the public as its steward. I call on the BLM to take the only responsible course. Drop the WOPR entirely. Act consistently with the overwhelmingly majority of Americans who value conservation.

Regards,

 

Stan Jewett

8605 SW BrightfieldCircle

BeavertonOR97223
EM-1857 Joel Kenney <pan@panix.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/28/2007 13:51:34 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Joel Kenney
1185 W 7th Aly #1
Eugene, OR 97402

541-343-0722
EM-1858 Daniel Parker <danielparker@mail.com> forest plan 12/28/2007 13:53:24 I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks.

The Northwest Forest Plan's protections should remain in place for BLM lands, not sacrificed in an out-of-court deal between the timber industry and the White House. Oregon ancient forests deserve permanent protection and should be managed to maintain important public assets such as clean drinking water, habitat for fish and wildlife, diverse recreation opportunities, stunning scenery, and jobs in forest restoration, fire safety and tourism.

Ancient forests in Oregon also serve as an important carbon storage and sequestration resource to help mitigate global warming. The BLM's plans for increased logging in these ancient forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revision will take America backwards in efforts to prevent global climate change. Clearcutting and damage to soils from logging has been shown to release tremendous amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, while old forests absorb and store carbon dioxide.

I am concerned that the changes the BLM has proposed in its Western Oregon Plan Revision will lead to the loss of Oregon's irreplaceable ancient forests, water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Much of the BLM forests in western Oregon are adjacent to private landowners who would like to see nearby forest managed to protect their home from wildfire and to preserve their water supply, scenery, and recreation opportunities. Additionally, these forests are owned by Americans across the nation, who would like to see them strongly protected for future generations to enjoy.

Please protect western BLM forests and maintain the Northwest Forest Plan reserve system. Please use your power in Congress to rein in the Bush administration and prevent them from spending money to log old growth forests, and stop the BLM from selling off Oregon's ancient forest heritage.

Sincerely,

Daniel Parker

--
Got No Time? Shop Online for Great Gift Ideas!
mail.com Shopping
EM-1859 Marta J Coston <mjcoston@hotmail.com> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 12/28/2007 14:07:41  
I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks.

Sincerely,

Marta Coston
16958 NW St Helen's RD            
Portland OR 97231
 
EM-1860 Julia Craig <jrdcraig@lmi.net> Wilderness evaluation and recommendation process has fallen short 12/28/2007 15:02:01 December 28, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). I am very
disappointed that the Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) preferred alternative
includes only five areas, despite a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands
managed by the plan. The BLM should include ke3eping many more areas from being
developed. The BLM�s process for evaluating and determining wilderness resources
and wilderness recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known
wild places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM�s analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM�s legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness � Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and
Coast Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Julia Craig
2337 Parker St Apt 7
Berkeley, CA 94704-2841
USA
jrdcraig@lmi.net


EM-1861 Andrea King <ajking@aceweb.com> OHV areas 12/28/2007 15:35:06  Dear BLM:
 
The following letter has been sent to my county commissioners; Raffenberg, Ellis, and Toler, federal and state senators and representatives, and the Illinois Valley News. 
 
 
Dear Josephine County Commissioners:
 
At your December 5, 2007 meeting you disallowed an activity that would disturb a residential neighborhood.
 
May I assume, then, that you also disapprove of the Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) Western Oregon Plan Revisions (WOPR) proposed Off Highway Vehicle (OHV) Emphasis Areas that abut residential lands in Josephine County?  I am particularly concerned that the Deer Creek Watershed, the community of Selma, is sandwiched north and south by the Elliot Creek and Illinois Valley OHV Emphasis Areas.  These proposed Emphasis Areas are interspersed with privately owned land where many residents treasure the quiet.
 
Will you charge the BLM to uphold Executive Order 11644, Section 3 (3) ". . . to ensure the compatibility of such uses (off-road vehicles) with existing conditions in populated areas, taking into account noise and other factors."?
 
Will you call on your constituents' other elected officials, Senator Jason Atkinson and Representative Ron Maurer at the state level, and Senators Ron Wyden and Gordon Smith and Representative Peter DeFazio on the national level, to remind the Medford District of the BLM of its own Rural Interface Area directive in their Resource Management Plan, page 88, to "Consider the interests of adjacent and nearby rural residential land owners . . . to avoid/minimize impacts to health, life, property and quality of life."?
 
Perhaps you have considered how you would respond if a government agency encouraged OHV users to ride through your back yard.  I appreciate your efforts to protect that valuable and fast disappearing commodity, the peaceful neighborhood.
 
Sincerely,
 
Andrea King-Brockman
 
 
 
 
EM-1862 Geezerpower <mosnas@gmail.com> Stop using our valuable resources. 12/28/2007 16:30:58 Why log off our forest lands in a failing economy. The housing boom is
over. Bu$hco's "Ownership Society" and "Healthy Forest's Iniative"
were used to promote the economy, but they have managed to bankrupt
the country anyway. You and I know that there will be no $ in the
hands of the working people for a long time. These crooks are planning
on shipping our resources to the highest bidder against a falling US
dollar. The only thing I can equate this with is for me too run all my
credit cards to the max so I can invest in gold...Beside that I really
do believe in the environment and appreciate things like pure water
and clean air, not to mention that whether global warming exists or
not (which it does!), we all need to get off our asses and work toward
making this a better planet...G:
EM-1863 Cody Donahue <donahuec@gmail.com> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 12/28/2007 16:31:01 I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks.

Sincerely,

  Cody Donahue
31760 Eastway St.
Lebanon, OR 97355-8904

--
Cody N. Donahue
E-mail: donahuec@gmail.com
Tel: +1.541.905.1245
Skype: donahuec

******************************************************
MA Sustainable Development, Candidate
PIM 66 - School for International Training
******************************************************
EM-1864 Kristopher Prusko <kprusko@yahoo.com> WOPR 12/28/2007 17:15:54 I am e-mailing the Bureau of Land Management, as well as Sen. Ron Wyden, Sen. Gordon Smith and Rep. Greg Walden regarding WOPR, which is a plan proposed by BLM to "revise" the Northwest Forest Plan.  I am very concerned that the BLM, which is supposed to be protecting the ecosystems that it manages, is instead jumping straight back in time to a policy of clear-cutting, with little regard to the ecological consequences.  In terms of appropriate logging policies, fire safety and ecosystem protection should be the primary concerns.  Clear-cut logging is not the best way to prevent wildfires, and its effect on erosion and plant life cycles is virtually always negative.

In addition to the problems of clear-cutting, I am also concerned about the BLM's apparently ardent desire to provide more opportunities for OHV parks.  Why is the BLM so interested in sacrificing natural resources that are enjoyed WITHOUT air, noise and land pollution by hikers and mountain bikers so that the VERY small minority of people who, for some unfathomable reason, enjoy ripping the earth to shreds on noisy, oil-guzzling ATVs can have yet more space on which to do so?  My husband and I have worked very hard to be able to live on our little piece of QUIET heaven.  If I have to drive 20 miles out of town, through snowy mountainous roads just to spend my summers listening to the endless roaring buzz of ATV's cruising through the BLM lands which  adjoin my property, I will be EXTREMELY upset. We specifically moved here for the peace, quiet and wildlife.  PLEASE, BLM, do NOT ruin Oregon.  These kinds of mistakes are almost impossible to repair.


Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
EM-1865 Jack & Suzan Shipley <rockycreekfarms@apbb.net> Applegte Partnership response to the Draft WOPR 12/28/2007 17:45:56 The Applegate Partnership is submitting the attached documents for our
response to the Draft WOPR.
We have also attached,as reference, a copy of our original proposal
that was submitted in October 2005.

Electronic and hard copies have been submitted to the following
individuals:

Dirk Kempthorne, Secretary of the Interior
Jim Caswell, BLM National Director
Ed Shepard, BLM State Director
Alan Hoffmeister, WOPR, Portland, Oregon
Tim Reuwsaat, BLM Medford District Manager
John Gerritsma, BLM Ashland Resource Area Manager
Abbie Jossie, BLM Grants Pass Resource Area Manager
Scott Conroy, USFS Rogue/Siskiyou Forest Supervisor
Linda Duffy, USFS Applegate District Ranger

Hard copies have been submitted to the following individuals:

Senator Ron Wyden
Senator Gordon Smith
Representative Greg Walden


Respectfully submitted,


Jack Shipley
Applegate Partnership, Chair
1340 Missouri Flat Rd.
Grants Pass, OR 97527
Phone/Fax: (541) 846-6917
AIM Account: jack@mac.com
Skype Address: jackshipley
rockycreekfarms@apbb.net

- Applegate Partnership draft WOPR Response.doc - 2005 WOPR Proposal.rtf
EM-1866 Jack & Suzan Shipley <rockycreekfarms@apbb.net> Applegate Partnership's response to the BLM WOPR 12/28/2007 18:55:44 The Applegate Partnership is submitting the attached documents as our response to the Draft WOPR.
We have also attached,as reference, a copy of our original proposal that was submitted in October 2005.

Electronic and hard copies have been submitted to the following individuals:

Dirk Kempthorne, Secretary of the Interior
Jim Caswell, BLM National Director
Ed Shepard, BLM State Director
Alan Hoffmeister, WOPR, Portland, Oregon
Tim Reuwsaat, BLM Medford District Manager
John Gerritsma, BLM Ashland Resource Area Manager
Abbie Jossie, BLM Grants Pass Resource Area Manager
Scott Conroy, USFS Rogue/Siskiyou Forest Supervisor
Linda Duffy, USFS Applegate District Ranger
Senator Ron Wyden
Senator Gordon Smith
Representative Greg Walden


Respectfully submitted,


Jack Shipley
Applegate Partnership, Chair
1340 Missouri Flat Rd.
Grants Pass, OR 97527
Phone/Fax: (541) 846-6917
AIM Account: jack@mac.com
Skype Address: jackshipley
rockycreekfarms@apbb.net - Applegate Partnership draft WOPR Response.doc - 2005 WOPR Proposal.rtf
EM-1867 Bonnie Merchant <bonnie@fabulousstuff.com> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 12/29/2007 7:56:43 I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks.  We already have overflowing creeks, floods and landslides.  Unnecessary logging will only compound these problems--the price of timber is depressed, why flood the market with more--is it all about tax breaks?


Sincerely,

Bonnie Merchant

PO Box 865

Beavercreek, OR 97004




Bonnie
http://www.FabulousStuff.com

EM-1868 stu o'neill <oneill.stu@gmail.com> Protect Public Forests, Rivers and Wildlife 12/29/2007 10:17:08 Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue Portland, Oregon
Portland, OR 97208

CC: Oregon Congressional delegation

Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions

Dear BLM,

I am very concerned with the direction the Bush Administration is headed in with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes that the BLM is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and may lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Your current proposal is unacceptable. The agency proposes to increase old-growth logging on public lands in western Oregon by 700%, build 1,000 miles of new logging road in the next decade and clearcut at a 9-1 ratio to thinning. This is a myopic and backwards proposal that depletes our natural resource base for future generations by weakening protections for forests, creeks and salmon. Shockingly, the proposal ignores the role that these forests play in regulating the climate.

Most Americans want federal land managers to embrace thinning second growth forests, safeguard communities from wildfire and protect what remains of our nation's ancient forests. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - they are providing wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

In contrast, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clear-cutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at-risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clear-cut these natural treasures as the WOPR proposes to do.

It is disappointing that at a time when public consensus for old-growth protection and second-growth thinning has never been stronger, the BLM is proposing to clear-cut forests older than our nation and turn complex ecosystems into flammable tree farms.

Please protect remaining old-growth forests, focus active management of BLM lands in already logged-over areas, and concentrate job opportunities in restoration forestry that would benefit watersheds and generate wood products without multiplying past mistakes.

Sincerely,

Stuart O'Neill
5758 Sterling Creek Road
Jacksonville, OR 97530
EM-1869 Michael Kemp <michael@kempclan.com> Please protect old-growth remnants 12/29/2007 12:37:40 Dear BLM,
I was born and raised in Oregon. As a boy and young man I enjoyed our forest, rivers, lakes, grasslands, mountains, and coastline.

I've lived elsewhere - Washington State, Upstate New York, Boston Massachusetts. I came back to Oregon to raise a family. My boys are grown now, and Oregon has changed. The forests are definitely shorter and skinnier. You get up on a high point and the Coast Range looks like it has a bad case of the mange. But there are still bits and pieces of majestic forest scattered around.

Enough of our public forest land is "in production." Manage what is already in timber rotation. Leave the stands of old growth alone.

The BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revision is a slap in the face. It promises to destroy any good will between the public and BLM that was hammered out in the Northwest Forest Plan.

Please consider me to be one of the "public" that owns the land you manage.

Michael Kemp
85009 Territorial Hwy
Eugene, OR 97402
EM-1870 kirsten potter <kpottermom@yahoo.com> "WOPR" comments 12/29/2007 13:57:55 My wife, Kirsten, and I are very concerned that Draft
Environmental Impact Statement for the WORP is
extremely damaging to what we Oregon people love:
tall, old growth forests; living space for deep forest
wildlife plants and animals; clear salmon creeks and
rivers; solitude; quiet and high quality watersheds.

Cutting down old growth forest, except in very limited
special cases, is wrong. I read the WOPR will do just
that. It will clear-cut much, much too much old
forest stands. This will do direct and extreme damage
to the above listed values. [And these values, in the
long term, are more valuable to society than the logs
to be taken off the land one time!]

Opening up our public land to noise, erosion and being
torn-up by off-road-vehicle tires is wrong too. It,
like logging, benefits a few at the great expense of
the majority. BLM presently is unable to police the
off road use - and damage - on its land now; do not
authorize more, please!

Please, please change the Draft EIS [or scrap the
whole politically driven process entirely] to stop
increased large scale ATV use of public lands and
logging of old growth - essentially irreplaceable -
forests.

Your political masters, Mr. Bush and company, are fast
losing power and sliding off into high paying industry
jobs. As a professional natural resource manager, I
appeal to you in authority to stop, derail, delay this
BAD plan. You grand-kids will thank you for standing
tall in the saddle. In retirement, you will have a
great deal of satisfaction for having corrected this
WOPR.

Thanks!
Dave & Kirsten Potter
3930 Rio Vista Way
Klamath Falls, OR 97603



____________________________________________________________________________________
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EM-1871 Arlene Fiorini <wolfdreamer30@hotmail.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/29/2007 17:11:41 Dear BLM,

I am against any more of this logging. It destroys everything including the balance of ecology. Everything from plants to animals.
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Arlene Fiorini
245 Wilson Rd
Oakland, OR 97462
EM-1872 Chuck McLauchlin <coastrunr@mycomspan.com> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 12/29/2007 20:30:54 I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by
the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving
forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase
logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in
currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon
bearing rivers and creeks.
This is horrible! The trees that are protected are protected for many
reasons. We can't lose sight of that, and we can't let the Western
Oregon Plan Revision come into effect.

Sincerely,

Caitlyn McLauchlin
P.O. Box 913 Bandon, OR, 97411
EM-1873 BatteryStuff <steve@batterystuff.com> WOPR concerns 12/29/2007 21:28:17 I am writing to express support for increased OHV use on land that is currently under review in the WOPR.  While there are litererally thousands of acres under review, there still seems to be the overall desire to limit access to OHV's.  I do not believe that OHV's should have unrestriced access to all public lands, but I even more believe that public land shoud be available for the entire public. To continue to reduce the acreage avaialble for OHV use, while at the same time OHV is growing among the public is only inviting disaster. As areas get smaller and use increases, the environmental impact will increase until it is a problem that can only be solved by shutting down areas. This seems to be a recurring issue over the last few decades, and could easily be solved by no longer disallowing more use on more acreage.
 
In specifics,  there are no proposed trails for OHV recreation, in spite of dozens of proposed trails for non-motorized uses.(page 134, volume 1) This is an embarrassing omission. Motorized use is increasing at a much faster rate than non-motorized, especially in this area. Motorized recreation also has a greater proven ability to pay for the mileage required for it. Proposed trails and trail mileage for motorized recreation should greatly exceed trail quantity for other uses.Most all trails on public land were originally established by OHV users, only to be taken away and designated non motorized use only. This establish and snatch policy needs to be stopped.  I support all of the OHV emphasis areas. I do not feel the 13 areas in the preferred alternative number 2 are enough to accommodate existing and future OHV recreation, especially accounting for its popularity and the growth of the area. I need specific information about the decision making process employed for final selection of the OHV emphasis areas. What specifically are the criteria for final selection of an area? Comment numbers? Complaint? Funding? What is the process? Enforcement seems to be hit and miss, and driven by individual preferences, rather than workable, real policy.
 
The Greyback Mountain Trail should also bear a Class III OHV designation for continuity with the Boundary Trail system, which it intersects. It is also an important connection corridor from the Boundary System to the Ferris Gulch OHV use area to the north.  Again, these trails were clearly established by OHV users, and we are now being denied access. This is clearly wrong.
 
Thanks for your consideration,
 
Steve DeGeyter
BatteryStuff.com
467 Clewis Lane
Grants Pass Or
 
 
This Email answered by Steve@batterystuff.com
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Hours Monday -Friday 7am to 3:30PM Pacific
Phone 541-582 4521 Fax 541 582-9178
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EM-1874 Kadaj The Ruiner <acid.drip@hotmail.com> Bush Administration Old Growth Logging Plans 12/30/2007 1:28:04 I was shocked to hear that such a thing would even be considered by such an already unpopular administration. I absolutely refuse to allow this to happen and should this plan go into action you WILL see me on site actively protesting and doing everything in my power to prevent it.

Don't get caught with egg on your face. Play Chicktionary! Check it out!
EM-1875 l gols <evlkg@yahoo.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 12/30/2007 7:02:01 December 30, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management�s (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas,
despite a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The
BLM�s process for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness
recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild
places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM�s analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM�s legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness � Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and
Coast Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

l gols
6 Walden Dr
Natick, MA 01760-3859
USA
evlkg@yahoo.com


EM-1876 Dominic Lovato <dominiclovato5@yahoo.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/30/2007 9:51:55 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Dominic Lovato
2930 SW Charity Ct
Troutdale, OR 97060
EM-1877 Erik - RecordsByMail <erik@recordsbymail.com> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 12/30/2007 9:57:39  
I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks.

Sincerely,
erik engelke
1509 ne 10th ave #104
portland or 97232
EM-1878 Lindon Schultz <lindonsterling@sbcglobal.net> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions 12/30/2007 18:52:38 December 30, 2007

 


Bureau of Land Management,

Western OregonPlan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue, Portland, OR97208

orwopr@or.blm.gov

 

 

Re: BLMWestern OregonPlan Revisions

 

 

Dear BLM,

 

I have been very disaponted with the Bush Adminsitration's management of America's public lands and I am am very concerned with the Administration's proposals to increase logging and off-road use on 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions.   The changes the Bureau of Land Management is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

 

[IMAGE]The Bush Administration would place half of the public land that the BLMmanages - and most of our best old-growth BLMforests - in "Timber Management Areas" to be clearcut every 80 years. The Bush Administration's preferred alternative proposes to clearcut 110,000 acres of Oregon's old-growth (120+ years) and build 1,000 mile of new logging roads every decade while creating over 100,000 miles of new Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas - all at the expense of roadless areas, threatened species, water quality and non-motorized recreation. Shockingly, the proposal ignores the role that these forests play in regulating the climate.

 

Most Americans want federal land managers to embrace thinning second growth forests, safeguard communities from wildfire and protect what remains of our nation's ancient forests. Indeed, many Oregonforest managers are already moving beyond the conflicts of the past. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - they are providing wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

 

In contrast, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

 

It is disappointing that at a time when public consensus for old-growth protection and second-growth thinning has never been stronger, the BLMis proposing to clearcut forests older than our nation and turn complex ecosystems into tree plantations most susceptible to severe wildfire.

 

Please protect remaining old-growth forests, focus active management of BLMlands in already logged-over areas, and create job opportunities in restoration thinning projects that benefit watersheds and generate wood products without multiplying past mistakes.

 

 

Sincerely,

 

 

Lindon Schultz

1809 1/2 Edgecliffe Dr

Los Angeles, CA90026-1145

  - image001.gif
EM-1879 slyfam <slyfam@earthlink.net> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 12/30/2007 18:57:46  
I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks.

Sincerely,

Alex Sylvester
 
big-footed@earthlink.net
EM-1880 Gordon Lyford <guinda@frontiernet.net> WOPR Comments 12/30/2007 20:48:18 WPOR comments.

- WOPRComments.pdf
EM-1881 Not Stuart Mitchell, but someone else! <sonofamitchell@gmail.com> Deforestation in Oregon 12/30/2007 20:55:27  
I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks.

Sincerely,

Stuart Mitchell
 
3695 N Shasta Loop


EM-1882 Leslee Doner <leslee_doner@hp.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/30/2007 21:02:01 December 30, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management?s (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM?s process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM?s analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM?s legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness ? Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Leslee Doner
2500 Millway Dr
Boise, ID 83709-2354
USA
leslee_doner@hp.com


EM-1883 Kymberly Dena <ilovelucy70@hotmail.com> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 12/30/2007 22:01:49  
I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clear cutting in currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks.

Sincerely,

Kymberly Winchell
EM-1884 robert thompson <mckarob@earthlink.net> comments 12/30/2007 22:41:21 Dear BLM,
It has come to my attention that the Northwest Forest Plan might be replaced with an alternative that would put timber production far ahead of all the other values of our forests.  The proposed plan would dramatically increase clearcut logging, establish noisy OHV parks, and construct logging roads in forests.  Your preferred alternative proposes logging forests that are over 200 years of age.  Such logging in the past has caused landslides and stream pollution, which impact property owners downstream and downhill.  I have seen that degradation living adjacent to Forest Creek.  I support responsible logging and encourage BLM to move forward with projects to thin forests, while protecting our most valuable and scenic lands.  I believe that most Oregonians want you to protect older forests on public lands, thin the second growth forests, and protect communities from wildfire.  I'm sure you are aware that deforestation is a major cause of! global warming.  There is plenty of logging that can be done in the vast tree plantations in the Northwest.  My other concern is that motorized recreation takes priority in the WOPR.  We live in the Johns Peak/Timber Mountain area and know first hand how detrimental those recreational vehicles can be.  I understand that 13 potential OHV emphasis area sites will be established.  These areas were never identified through any public process, but strictly chosen because they were currently receiving a moderate to high level of OHV use!!  Good grief!  OHV's create an incredible amount of noise and pollution, and the damage caused by irresponsible riders can be alarming.  We should be able to use the public lands to hike, fish, hunt, camp, view wildlife and enjoy quiet-type recreation.  Why do OHV's get the go-ahead?  I invite you to come and sit with us on our porch some weekend and try to carry on a conversatio! n while the dirt bikes serenade us.  I know that the Administrati on has received millions of dollars from timber companies in Oregon.  Hopefully the WOPR isn't a way to pay back big timber donors who contributed to Bush's election cmpaign?  Our American treasures deserve to be protected, not squandered for political gain.  I'm sure there is a better way to design projects with community support.  Thanks for listening,  Sincerely,  Karen Mitchell  (3680 Forest Creek Road  Jacksonville,  Or  97530)
 
 
 
 
 

EM-1885 Mary Dyer <marydyer2@netzero.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/31/2007 6:02:01 December 31, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management?s (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas, despite
a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The BLM?s process
for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild places exhibiting
excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM?s analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM?s legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness ? Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and Coast
Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Mary Dyer
834 Robinwood Dr
Troy, MI 48083-1869
USA
marydyer2@netzero.com


EM-1886 liz capizzi <eacapizz@peak.org> Please protect our old-growth forests! 12/31/2007 6:25:57 Dear BLM,
I live in Oregon for a variety of reasons, including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won't be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon's spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

liz capizzi
p.o. box 1534
philomath, OR 97370
EM-1887 Timothy F. Brewer <tim@tfbrewer.com> Protect Public Forests, Rivers and Wildlife 12/31/2007 10:12:45 Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office

333 SW 1st. Avenue Portland, Oregon

Portland, OR 97208


CC: Oregon Congressional delegation


Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions


Dear BLM,


I am very concerned with the direction the Bush Administration is headed in with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes that the BLM is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and may lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.


Your current proposal is unacceptable. The agency proposes to increase old-growth logging on public lands in western Oregon by 700%, build 1,000 miles of new logging road in the next decade and clearcut at a 9-1 ratio to thinning. This is a myopic and backwards proposal that depletes our natural resource base for future generations by weakening protections for forests, creeks and salmon. Shockingly, the proposal ignores the role that these forests play in regulating the climate. 


Most Americans want federal land managers to embrace thinning second growth forests, safeguard communities from wildfire and protect what remains of our nation's ancient forests. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - they are providing wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.


In contrast, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clear-cutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at-risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clear-cut these natural treasures as the WOPR proposes to do.


It is disappointing that at a time when public consensus for old-growth protection and second-growth thinning has never been stronger, the BLM is proposing to clear-cut forests older than our nation and turn complex ecosystems into flammable tree farms.


Please protect remaining old-growth forests, focus active management of BLM lands in already logged-over areas, and concentrate job opportunities in restoration forestry that would benefit watersheds and generate wood products without multiplying past mistakes.


Sincerely,


Tim Brewer


PSThe existing Northwest Forest Plan works. It was created with substantial input and compromise from all stakeholders. There is no need or reason to gut it now, and doing so represents a breach of faith with the thousands of people who contributed to and believed in the plan. Thank you for considering the long-term ramifications of the WOPR and for protecting and nurturing this valuable resource for future generations.


Timothy F. Brewer
Timothy F. Brewer, P.C.
590 West 13th Avenue
Eugene, OR 97401
telephone: 541-683-1814
fax: 541-484-3926
email: tim@tfbrewer.com



EM-1888 patrick & sally brodigan <85samdub@comcast.net> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 12/31/2007 11:39:00  
I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks.
 
I would like to protect our clean drinking water as well as offset the increasing effects of global warming.

Thank you, Sally A. Brodigan
                  888 Fairview Ave. S.E..
                  Salem, OR. 97302
EM-1889 tfielden@pdx.edu Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 12/31/2007 12:40:56 Dear BLM,

I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by
the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving
forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase
logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in
currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon
bearing rivers and creeks.

Sincerely,

Tom Fielden
615 SW Rustica Ter
Portland, Oregon 97225
EM-1890 Donna Crane <d.crane@care2.com> Wild Rogue Additions should be recommended wilderness 12/31/2007 18:52:01 December 31, 2007

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management�s (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas,
despite a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The
BLM�s process for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness
recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild
places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM�s analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM�s legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness � Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and
Coast Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Donna Crane
1576 Beebe Ln
Eugene, OR 97404
USA
d.crane@care2.com


EM-1891 Megan Dewey <megan_dewey@mac.com> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 12/31/2007 20:27:59 I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by
the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving
forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase
logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in
currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon
bearing rivers and creeks.

Sincerely,

Megan Dewey
EM-1892 Barbara Singer <barbsinger6260@aol.com> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 1/1/2008 4:02:01 January 01, 2008

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management�s (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas,
despite a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The
BLM�s process for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness
recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild
places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM�s analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM�s legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness � Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and
Coast Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

Barbara Singer
8731 W Summerdale Ave Unit 3C
Chicago, IL 60656-2330
USA
barbsinger6260@aol.com


EM-1893 David Kizer <david@kizergroup.com> WOPR comments 1/1/2008 10:18:22 My concern for whatever plan adopted, is that it provide adequate
protection for all streams (not just listed quality limited) and habitat
for all native fish (not just listed threatened or endangered). I would
like for the adopted plan, regarding any proposed land use,
1) First repair damage done to streams and habitat as a result of
previous land uses;
2) Identify possible adverse consequences to streams and habitat as a
result of proposed future land uses;
3) Provide for monitoring for those adverse consequences during
implementation of the land uses proposed in the plan;
4) Provide for restoration of streams damaged as a result of land uses
implemented under the plan, and
5) Cease or modify any land uses that cause stream damage that can not
be mitigated under the plan.

The reason is simply the importance played by our native fish and
streams in the culture and economy of our region. For a large segment
of our population, it is a quality of life issue (refer to the number of
fishing licenses for example). For a larger segment, our native fish
are a cornerstone their livelihood, affecting those not only those
employed directly such as in guide services, but also indirectly such as
in things like bait & tackle production and sales, boat building and
sales, RV industry, campgrounds, food services, lodging, and all the
rest associated with recreational fishing and tourism.

Thanks,

David Kizer
13080 Three Oaks Drive
White City, OR 97503
EM-1894 kathleen blevins <katblev@earthlink.net> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 1/1/2008 12:40:20 I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks.  Please stop this action now.   Short term greed is not worth long term loss.   Sincerely,  Kathleen Blevins,   394 E. Vine Street,  Lebanon, Oregon  97355
 
 
kathleen blevins
katblev@earthlink.net
Why Wait? Move to EarthLink.
 

EM-1895 Manor Reception <reception@willametteview.org> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 1/1/2008 18:03:41 I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clear cutting in currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks.

 
I beg of you, please put a stop to this apprehensible revision plan. These stately old growth forests are precious and few. We should all be working to protect and preserve what is left of them for future generations. Like the giant redwoods in California that were threatened, these forests need permanent protection. What a tragedy if the loggers and timber industry had been allowed to carry out their devastating plans years ago. If they had there would be no magnificent redwoods to see today and be amazed by. Past generations cared enough to protect the redwood forests for us and we have the same obligation to protect the old growth forests for those that follow us. These forests are irreplaceable, priceless treasures to be loved not logged!

Sincerely,

P.M. Gustafson
5510 SE Oetkin Road
Portland, Oregon  97267
 

 
 























EM-1896 Kristy Lee Reddick <paintchip4@hotmail.com> Protect BLM Old Growth Forests 1/1/2008 20:27:18 To whom this may concern:
 
I am writing in regards to the  2.6 million acres of forest managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. I have been informed that the BLM is moving forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clear cutting in currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks. This should not be tolerated as this portion of the ecosystem is so vital to the health, stability and beauty of our state. I hope that measures will be taken to prevent the devastation of Oregon's old growth forests.
 
 
Sincerely,
Kristy Reddick   
 
2736 Main Street Apt. 92
Forest Grove, Oregon 97116


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EM-1897 courtney@scottwork.com Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 1/1/2008 21:36:26 I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by the
Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving forward with
the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in Oregon's
old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in currently protected old
growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks.

Sincerely,
Courtney Scott
2106 NE Flanders
Portland, ROR 97232

EM-1898 William Turner <billt@sor.timbeerproducts.com> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision 1/2/2008 7:01:38 William Turner
P.O. Box 766
Yreka, CA 96097-0766


January 2, 2008

Edward Shepard
OR/WA State Director
Bureau of Land Management
PO Box 2965
Portland, OR 97208


Dear Edward Shepard:

Please accept the following comments on the BLM's Draft Environmental
Impact Statement for the Revision of the Resource Management Plans for
Western Oregon.

None of the three alternatives presented in the DEIS meet the requirements
of the O&C Act because they do not manage the land for the dominant use of
timber production. Reserving the majority (52%) of the suitable
timberlands for the purpose of a listed species is contrary to the O&C Act.

Because of the unique nature of the O&C Lands, by law these lands are not
available to be part of a reserve system designed to recover a listed
species. The BLM should consider active management for the protection of
listed and sensitive species and their habitat before adopting passive,
reserve strategies. The alternative selected by the BLM, however, should
be one that will not jeopardize the continued existence of listed species
within the species entire habitat range.

The BLM must develop and analyzes at least one alternative that maximizes
the amount of land in timber production and receipts to local county
governments, and meets its no jeopardy obligation.

Congress and the Administration must ensure that when the Plan is
finalized that the BLM receives adequate funding so that it can be fully
implemented.

Timber sale revenues must generate at least an amount equal to the funding
that was provided to local counties through the Secure Rural Schools and
Community Self-Determination Act on a yearly basis.

All BLM administered land should be managed to minimize the threat of
catastrophic wildfire on these lands and surrounding state and private
lands.

Access should be maintained through BLM administered lands for private
land access, fire suppression, as well as recreational uses, such as
hunting, fishing, boating and sightseeing.

In summary, the economic viability of our rural communities and the
overall health of our federal forests are of vital importance to me. I
ask that you give these comments full consideration as you prepare the
final Environmental Impact Statement and select the final management plans
for the Western Oregon BLM Districts.

Sincerely,


William Turner

EM-1899 Zach Haas <zachhaas@hamptonaffiliates.com> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision 1/2/2008 7:31:52 Zach Haas
P.O. Box 2315
Salem, OR 97308-2315


January 2, 2008

Edward Shepard
OR/WA State Director
Bureau of Land Management
PO Box 2965
Portland, OR 97208


Dear Edward Shepard:

Please accept the following comments on the BLM's Draft Environmental
Impact Statement for the Revision of the Resource Management Plans for
Western Oregon.

None of the three alternatives presented in the DEIS meet the requirements
of the O&C Act because they do not manage the land for the dominant use of
timber production. Reserving the majority (52%) of the suitable
timberlands for the purpose of a listed species is contrary to the O&C Act.

Because of the unique nature of the O&C Lands, by law these lands are not
available to be part of a reserve system designed to recover a listed
species. The BLM should consider active management for the protection of
listed and sensitive species and their habitat before adopting passive,
reserve strategies. The alternative selected by the BLM, however, should
be one that will not jeopardize the continued existence of listed species
within the species entire habitat range.

The BLM must develop and analyzes at least one alternative that maximizes
the amount of land in timber production and receipts to local county
governments, and meets its no jeopardy obligation.

Congress and the Administration must ensure that when the Plan is
finalized that the BLM receives adequate funding so that it can be fully
implemented.

When implemented, the Plan should live up to the full commitment that was
made to local counties.

Timber sale revenues must generate at least an amount equal to the funding
that was provided to local counties through the Secure Rural Schools and
Community Self-Determination Act on a yearly basis.

All BLM administered land should be managed to minimize the threat of
catastrophic wildfire on these lands and surrounding state and private
lands.

Access should be maintained through BLM administered lands for private
land access, fire suppression, as well as recreational uses, such as
hunting, fishing, boating and sightseeing.

In summary, the economic viability of our rural communities and the
overall health of our federal forests are of vital importance to me. I
ask that you give these comments full consideration as you prepare the
final Environmental Impact Statement and select the final management plans
for the Western Oregon BLM Districts.

Sincerely,


Zach Haas
5033658400

EM-1900 Dave Ivanoff <daveivanoff@hamptonaffiliates.com> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision 1/2/2008 8:16:52 Dave Ivanoff
PO Box 2315
Salem, OR 97308-2315


January 2, 2008

Edward Shepard
OR/WA State Director
Bureau of Land Management
PO Box 2965
Portland, OR 97208


Dear Edward Shepard:

Please accept the following comments on the BLM's Draft Environmental
Impact Statement for the Revision of the Resource Management Plans for
Western Oregon.

None of the three alternatives presented in the DEIS meet the requirements
of the O&C Act because they do not manage the land for the dominant use of
timber production. Reserving the majority (52%) of the suitable
timberlands for the purpose of a listed species is contrary to the O&C Act.

Because of the unique nature of the O&C Lands, by law these lands are not
available to be part of a reserve system designed to recover a listed
species. The BLM should consider active management for the protection of
listed and sensitive species and their habitat before adopting passive,
reserve strategies. The alternative selected by the BLM, however, should
be one that will not jeopardize the continued existence of listed species
within the species entire habitat range.

The BLM must develop and analyzes at least one alternative that maximizes
the amount of land in timber production and receipts to local county
governments, and meets its no jeopardy obligation.

Congress and the Administration must ensure that when the Plan is
finalized that the BLM receives adequate funding so that it can be fully
implemented.

When implemented, the Plan should live up to the full commitment that was
made to local counties.

Timber sale revenues must generate at least an amount equal to the funding
that was provided to local counties through the Secure Rural Schools and
Community Self-Determination Act on a yearly basis.

All BLM administered land should be managed to minimize the threat of
catastrophic wildfire on these lands and surrounding state and private
lands.

All BLM administered land should be managed to minimize the threat of
catastrophic wildfire on these lands and surrounding state and private
lands.

Access should be maintained through BLM administered lands for private
land access, fire suppression, as well as recreational uses, such as
hunting, fishing, boating and sightseeing.

In summary, the economic viability of our rural communities and the
overall health of our federal forests are of vital importance to me. I
ask that you give these comments full consideration as you prepare the
final Environmental Impact Statement and select the final management plans
for the Western Oregon BLM Districts.

Sincerely,


Dave Ivanoff
503-365-8400

EM-1901 Darrell Alvord <darrellalvord@hamptonafflitiates.com> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision 1/2/2008 8:38:41 Darrell Alvord
1655 S. Market suite A
Chehalis, WA 98532-3826


January 2, 2008

Edward Shepard
OR/WA State Director
Bureau of Land Management
PO Box 2965
Portland, OR 97208


Dear Edward Shepard:

Please accept the following comments on the BLM's Draft Environmental
Impact Statement for the Revision of the Resource Management Plans for
Western Oregon.

None of the three alternatives presented in the DEIS meet the requirements
of the O&C Act because they do not manage the land for the dominant use of
timber production. Reserving the majority (52%) of the suitable
timberlands for the purpose of a listed species is contrary to the O&C Act.

The BLM must develop and analyzes at least one alternative that maximizes
the amount of land in timber production and receipts to local county
governments, and meets its no jeopardy obligation.

When implemented, the Plan should live up to the full commitment that was
made to local counties.

Access should be maintained through BLM administered lands for private
land access, fire suppression, as well as recreational uses, such as
hunting, fishing, boating and sightseeing.

In summary, the economic viability of our rural communities and the
overall health of our federal forests are of vital importance to me. I
ask that you give these comments full consideration as you prepare the
final Environmental Impact Statement and select the final management plans
for the Western Oregon BLM Districts.

Sincerely,


Darrell Alvord
360-748-4566

EM-1902 mark eneret <markeneret@hotmail.com> STOP LOGGING OLD GROWTH ! 1/2/2008 8:41:47 The BLM is moving forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision :
 
STOP THIS ! You are raping the land for selfish, personal economic gains.
 
As living creatures (for a short time), it is our obligation to SUSTAIN life for future generations.
 
The only reason to destroy the small old growth forests left is $$$$$$$$$$
 
   Time to ADAPT : do sustainable logging of the fast growing woods: poplar, etc.
 
LEAVE THE OLD GROWTH ALONE !!


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EM-1903 Rachel Goodman <rachron@frontiernet.net> Protect Public Forests, Rivers and Wildlife 1/2/2008 8:57:30 Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st.
Avenue Portland, Oregon
Portland, OR 97208

CC: Oregon Congressional
delegation

Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions
Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the Bush Administration is headed in
with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the
Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes that the BLM is contemplating
will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and may
lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and
controversy.

Your current proposal is unacceptable. The agency proposes to
increase old-growth logging on public lands in western Oregon by 700%, build
1,000 miles of new logging road in the next decade and clearcut at a 9-1
ratio to thinning. This is a myopic and backwards proposal that depletes our
natural resource base for future generations by weakening protections for
forests, creeks and salmon. Shockingly, the proposal ignores the role that
these forests play in regulating the climate.

Most Americans want federal
land managers to embrace thinning second growth forests, safeguard
communities from wildfire and protect what remains of our nation's ancient
forests. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which
are now overgrown and in need of thinning - they are providing wood to local
mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping
saws out of precious old-growth forests.

In contrast, the WOPR proposes to
inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clear-cutting for a
short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at-risk and would
destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our
remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clear-cut these
natural treasures as the WOPR proposes to do.

It is disappointing that at a
time when public consensus for old-growth protection and second-growth
thinning has never been stronger, the BLM is proposing to clear-cut forests
older than our nation and turn complex ecosystems into flammable tree
farms.

Please protect remaining old-growth forests, focus active management
of BLM lands in already logged-over areas, and concentrate job opportunities
in restoration forestry that would benefit watersheds and generate wood
products without multiplying past mistakes.
Sincerely,
Rachel Goodman
11265 Takilma Rd.
Cave Junction, OR 97523
EM-1904 David Garvida <davidgarvida@hamptonaffiliates.com> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision 1/2/2008 9:04:09 David Garvida
1655 S. Market Blvd., Suite A
Chehalis, WA 98532-3826


January 2, 2008

Edward Shepard
OR/WA State Director
Bureau of Land Management
PO Box 2965
Portland, OR 97208


Dear Edward Shepard:

Please accept the following comments on the BLM's Draft Environmental
Impact Statement for the Revision of the Resource Management Plans for
Western Oregon.

Because of the unique nature of the O&C Lands, by law these lands are not
available to be part of a reserve system designed to recover a listed
species. The BLM should consider active management for the protection of
listed and sensitive species and their habitat before adopting passive,
reserve strategies. The alternative selected by the BLM, however, should
be one that will not jeopardize the continued existence of listed species
within the species entire habitat range.

None of the three alternatives presented in the DEIS meet the requirements
of the O&C Act because they do not manage the land for the dominant use of
timber production. Reserving the majority (52%) of the suitable
timberlands for the purpose of a listed species is contrary to the O&C Act.

The BLM must develop and analyzes at least one alternative that maximizes
the amount of land in timber production and receipts to local county
governments, and meets its no jeopardy obligation.

Congress and the Administration must ensure that when the Plan is
finalized that the BLM receives adequate funding so that it can be fully
implemented. When implemented, the Plan should live up to the full
commitment that was made to local counties.

Timber sale revenues must generate at least an amount equal to the funding
that was provided to local counties through the Secure Rural Schools and
Community Self-Determination Act on a yearly basis.


In summary, the economic viability of our rural communities and the
overall health of our federal forests are of vital importance to me. I
ask that you give these comments full consideration as you prepare the
final Environmental Impact Statement and select the final management plans
for the Western Oregon BLM Districts.

Sincerely,


David Garvida
360.7484566

EM-1905 Mark Kemp <markkemp@hamptonaffiliates.com> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision 1/2/2008 9:23:34 Mark Kemp
P.O.Box 2315
Salem, OR 97308-2315


January 2, 2008

Edward Shepard
OR/WA State Director
Bureau of Land Management
PO Box 2965
Portland, OR 97208


Dear Edward Shepard:

Please accept the following comments on the BLM's Draft Environmental
Impact Statement for the Revision of the Resource Management Plans for
Western Oregon.

None of the three alternatives presented in the DEIS meet the requirements
of the O&C Act because they do not manage the land for the dominant use of
timber production. Reserving the majority (52%) of the suitable
timberlands for the purpose of a listed species is contrary to the O&C Act.

Because of the unique nature of the O&C Lands, by law these lands are not
available to be part of a reserve system designed to recover a listed
species. The BLM should consider active management for the protection of
listed and sensitive species and their habitat before adopting passive,
reserve strategies. The alternative selected by the BLM, however, should
be one that will not jeopardize the continued existence of listed species
within the species entire habitat range.

The BLM must develop and analyzes at least one alternative that maximizes
the amount of land in timber production and receipts to local county
governments, and meets its no jeopardy obligation.

Congress and the Administration must ensure that when the Plan is
finalized that the BLM receives adequate funding so that it can be fully
implemented.

When implemented, the Plan should live up to the full commitment that was
made to local counties.

Timber sale revenues must generate at least an amount equal to the funding
that was provided to local counties through the Secure Rural Schools and
Community Self-Determination Act on a yearly basis.

All BLM administered land should be managed to minimize the threat of
catastrophic wildfire on these lands and surrounding state and private
lands.

Access should be maintained through BLM administered lands for private
land access, fire suppression, as well as recreational uses, such as
hunting, fishing, boating and sightseeing.

In summary, the economic viability of our rural communities and the
overall health of our federal forests are of vital importance to me. I
ask that you give these comments full consideration as you prepare the
final Environmental Impact Statement and select the final management plans
for the Western Oregon BLM Districts.

Sincerely,


Mark A. Kemp
1-503-365-8400

EM-1906 Beth Hindman <bether97219@yahoo.com> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 1/2/2008 9:33:37 I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks. Considering the recent flooding and mudslides in the Vernonia area and along Hwy30, most likely caused by clearcutting and the resulting inability for the land to "hold" the rain, it is most urgent that you reconsider this Western Oregon Plan Revision.


Sincerely,
Beth Hindman
3227 SW Dolph Ct.
Portland, OR 97219


Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.
EM-1907 Britt Shackelford <brittshackelford@hamptonaffiliates.com> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision 1/2/2008 10:22:44 Britt Shackelford
PO Box 2315
Salem, OR 97308-2315


January 2, 2008

Edward Shepard
OR/WA State Director
Bureau of Land Management
PO Box 2965
Portland, OR 97208


Dear Edward Shepard:

Please accept the following comments on the BLM's Draft Environmental
Impact Statement for the Revision of the Resource Management Plans for
Western Oregon.

Because of the unique nature of the O&C Lands, by law these lands are not
available to be part of a reserve system designed to recover a listed
species. The BLM should consider active management for the protection of
listed and sensitive species and their habitat before adopting passive,
reserve strategies. The alternative selected by the BLM, however, should
be one that will not jeopardize the continued existence of listed species
within the species entire habitat range.

The BLM must develop and analyzes at least one alternative that maximizes
the amount of land in timber production and receipts to local county
governments, and meets its no jeopardy obligation.

All BLM administered land should be managed to minimize the threat of
catastrophic wildfire on these lands and surrounding state and private
lands.

In summary, the economic viability of our rural communities and the
overall health of our federal forests are of vital importance to me. I
ask that you give these comments full consideration as you prepare the
final Environmental Impact Statement and select the final management plans
for the Western Oregon BLM Districts.

Sincerely,


Britt Shackelford
503-365-8400

EM-1908 Richard <randlthom@ccwebster.net> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 1/2/2008 10:31:31  
I am appalled that the Bureau of Land Management has even considered increased logging of Oregon's old-growth forests especially at a time when demand for western timber has declined.  What a narrow-minded, short-sided management plan!  I am disgusted with the BLM pandering and the current administration's greed and avarice.

Richard L. Thompson
15789 S. Bradley Rd.
Oregon City, OR 97045
EM-1909 Richard <randlthom@ccwebster.net> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 1/2/2008 10:39:22  
I am appaled that the Bush Administration and the Bureau of Land Management have taken it upon themselves to increase logging in Oregon's old-growth forests.  It appears that short-sightedness and greed will once again prevail.  Shame!  

Sincerely,

Richard L. Thompson
15789 S. Bradley Road
Oregon City, OR 97045
EM-1910 Richard <randlthom@ccwebster.net> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 1/2/2008 10:45:57  
I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks.

Sincerely,

Richard L. Thompson
15789 S. Bradley Rd.
Oregon City, OR 97045
EM-1911 Bob Beamer <bobbeamer@hamptonaffiliates.com> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision 1/2/2008 11:04:38 Bob Beamer
3218 Martin Road
Mount Vernon, WA 98273-8626


January 2, 2008

Edward Shepard
OR/WA State Director
Bureau of Land Management
PO Box 2965
Portland, OR 97208


Dear Edward Shepard:

Please accept the following comments on the BLM's Draft Environmental
Impact Statement for the Revision of the Resource Management Plans for
Western Oregon.

None of the three alternatives presented in the DEIS meet the requirements
of the O&C Act because they do not manage the land for the dominant use of
timber production. Reserving the majority (52%) of the suitable
timberlands for the purpose of a listed species is contrary to the O&C Act.

Because of the unique nature of the O&C Lands, by law these lands are not
available to be part of a reserve system designed to recover a listed
species. The BLM should consider active management for the protection of
listed and sensitive species and their habitat before adopting passive,
reserve strategies. The alternative selected by the BLM, however, should
be one that will not jeopardize the continued existence of listed species
within the species entire habitat range.

The BLM must develop and analyzes at least one alternative that maximizes
the amount of land in timber production and receipts to local county
governments, and meets its no jeopardy obligation.

Congress and the Administration must ensure that when the Plan is
finalized that the BLM receives adequate funding so that it can be fully
implemented.

When implemented, the Plan should live up to the full commitment that was
made to local counties.

Timber sale revenues must generate at least an amount equal to the funding
that was provided to local counties through the Secure Rural Schools and
Community Self-Determination Act on a yearly basis.

All BLM administered land should be managed to minimize the threat of
catastrophic wildfire on these lands and surrounding state and private
lands.

Access should be maintained through BLM administered lands for private
land access, fire suppression, as well as recreational uses, such as
hunting, fishing, boating and sightseeing.

In summary, the economic viability of our rural communities and the
overall health of our federal forests are of vital importance to me. I
ask that you give these comments full consideration as you prepare the
final Environmental Impact Statement and select the final management plans
for the Western Oregon BLM Districts.

Sincerely,


Bob Beamer
360 416 6634

EM-1912 Drew Robertson <drobertson@csc.gen.or.us> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 1/2/2008 12:23:04 I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by the
Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving forward with
the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in Oregon's
old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in currently protected old
growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks.

The remaining acres of our nation's old growth forests are national
treasures and a national resource shared by all American citizens. It is
absolutely not the will of the people, the people you have been hired to
serve, to have the old growth forests diminished. You are suppose to serve
all American citizens, not just the citizens who make their money from the
timeber industry. Let the timber industry cut where they have already cut.
Please leave the last of America's heritage of great old growth forests
alone. To cut them is not at all your mandate.

Sincerely,
Drew C. Robertson
542 NW 2nd St.
Corvallis, OR 97330
EM-1913 susan farrell <skry@mindspring.com> Protect Public Forests, Rivers and Wildlife 1/2/2008 13:20:41 Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue Portland, Oregon
Portland, OR 97208

CC: Oregon Congressional delegation

Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions

Dear BLM,

We need a more long-range and comprehensive plan to help loggers find
employment. Cutting more old-growth is not only going to be
ineffective in saving logging jobs in the long term, it will create
irreversible damage to already threatened delicate environments.

I am very concerned with the direction the Bush Administration is
headed in with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal
forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes that the
BLM is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark
Northwest Forest Plan, and may lead to water pollution, degraded
habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Your current proposal is unacceptable. The agency proposes to
increase old-growth logging on public lands in western Oregon by
700%, build 1,000 miles of new logging road in the next decade and
clearcut at a 9-1 ratio to thinning. This is a myopic and backwards
proposal that depletes our natural resource base for future
generations by weakening protections for forests, creeks and salmon.
Shockingly, the proposal ignores the role that these forests play in
regulating the climate.

Most Americans want federal land managers to embrace thinning second
growth forests, safeguard communities from wildfire and protect what
remains of our nation's ancient forests. By focusing on previously
logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in
need of thinning - they are providing wood to local mills while
actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws
out of precious old-growth forests.

In contrast, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by
increasing old-growth clear-cutting for a short-term economic fix.
The WOPR puts water quality at-risk and would destroy some of
Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature
and old-growth forests on public land, not clear-cut these natural
treasures as the WOPR proposes to do.

It is disappointing that at a time when public consensus for old-
growth protection and second-growth thinning has never been stronger,
the BLM is proposing to clear-cut forests older than our nation and
turn complex ecosystems into flammable tree farms.

Please protect remaining old-growth forests, focus active management
of BLM lands in already logged-over areas, and concentrate job
opportunities in restoration forestry that would benefit watersheds
and generate wood products without multiplying past mistakes.

Sincerely,

Susan Farrell
PO Box 80825
Portland OR 97280
EM-1914 The Boy Who Apparently Goes by Luke. <snooplukeyluke@gmail.com> save our forests 1/2/2008 13:34:36 please do not let Bushs administration destroy any of our endangered old growth forests,
anywhere in the state of Oregon.
I am so fed up with his administration, this is just the straw that broke the camels back.
sincerely Emma A Stotler

EM-1915 David Hampton <davidhampton@hamptonaffiliates.com> BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision 1/2/2008 15:31:29 David Hampton
PO box 2315
Salem, OR 97308-2315


January 2, 2008

Edward Shepard
OR/WA State Director
Bureau of Land Management
PO Box 2965
Portland, OR 97208


Dear Edward Shepard:

Please accept the following comments on the BLM's Draft Environmental
Impact Statement for the Revision of the Resource Management Plans for
Western Oregon.

None of the three alternatives presented in the DEIS meet the requirements
of the O&C Act because they do not manage the land for the dominant use of
timber production. Reserving the majority (52%) of the suitable
timberlands for the purpose of a listed species is contrary to the O&C Act.

The BLM must develop and analyzes at least one alternative that maximizes
the amount of land in timber production and receipts to local county
governments, and meets its no jeopardy obligation.

Congress and the Administration must ensure that when the Plan is
finalized that the BLM receives adequate funding so that it can be fully
implemented.

All BLM administered land should be managed to minimize the threat of
catastrophic wildfire on these lands and surrounding state and private
lands.

In summary, the economic viability of our rural communities and the
overall health of our federal forests are of vital importance to me. I
ask that you give these comments full consideration as you prepare the
final Environmental Impact Statement and select the final management plans
for the Western Oregon BLM Districts.

Sincerely,


David Hampton
5033658400

EM-1916 Karen Six <retroceramics@hotmail.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 1/2/2008 15:39:43 Dear BLM,
I am writing to express my my feelings about the current proposal to increase logging of forests which include old growth trees over 200 years old. I live in Alsea, where this harvesting would greatly impact my own quality of life, as well as that of the animals, birds, and fish which depend on the diversity in these mixed forests. I would rather pay more in property tax and other taxes than lose these precious few old trees. This is public land, and the public should have the final say about what happens to it.

I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Karen Six
P.O. Box 171
Alsea, OR 97324
EM-1917 sgardner13@comcast.net MY Voice 1/2/2008 15:45:07 Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue Portland, Oregon
Portland, OR 97208

CC: Oregon Congressional delegation

Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions

Dear BLM,
 
Human to human... Shame on you if you let this happen.  You rob your children of the beauty of this planet for money?  Think of yourself years from now.. where will you fish with your grandchildren?  What campfire will you sit around then?  What nature hike will you share with the sons and daughters of your children now?  What will YOUR future family albumes contain???  Shame on you if you let this happen.  WE share this same planet.  YOU share what's 'left over' with your furture generations as much as we do.  Step UP and do something real in your offices and in between your power meetings.  Make your story the one of  "I really DID make a difference when I had the trust of The People".  Protect what belongs to your children.  This forest, what's left of any of our Nature, is all that you really have to pass on.  We ask you to SEE that and be the champion we thought you were.! ..  ;
 
I am very concerned with the direction the Bush Administration is headed in with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes that the BLM is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and may lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Your current proposal is unacceptable. The agency proposes to increase old-growth logging on public lands in western Oregon by 700%, build 1,000 miles of new logging road in the next decade and clearcut at a 9-1 ratio to thinning. This is a myopic and backwards proposal that depletes our natural resource base for future generations by weakening protections for forests, creeks and salmon. Shockingly, the proposal ignores the role that these forests play in regulating the climate.

Most Americans want federal land managers to embrace thinning second growth forests, safeguard commu! nities from wildfire and protect what remains of our nation's ancient forests. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - they are providing wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

In contrast, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clear-cutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at-risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clear-cut these natural treasures as the WOPR proposes to do.

It is disappointing that at a time when public consensus for old-growth protection and second-growth thinning has never been stronger, the BLM is proposing to clear-cut forests older than our nation and turn complex ecosystems into flammable tree farms.

Please protect r! emainin g old-growth forests, focus active management of BLM lands in already logged-over areas, and concentrate job opportunities in restoration forestry that would benefit watersheds and generate wood products without multiplying past mistakes.

Sincerely,

Susan Gardner
p.o. box 24988
Denver, co 80224
EM-1918 Allan Six <retroceramics@hotmail.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 1/2/2008 15:48:20 Dear BLM,
This plan to increase logging on public lands is shameful! Don't any of the staff at BLM have serious reservations about losing these 200 year old trees that we can never replace?! Well, we here in Alsea do! We have hiked to many of these giant trees and seen the wildlife that flourishes in and around them. These are areas where much more public support could be rallied to put in trails and increase tourism than for this ugly clearcutting. We as taxpayers should be the ones who decide what happens to these public lands.

I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Allan Six
P.O. Box 171
Alsea, OR 97324
EM-1919 Chip Hall <chiphall@nehalemtel.net> Please protect our old-growth forests! 1/2/2008 16:14:39 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Chip Hall
PO Box 481
Manzanita, OR 97130-0481
EM-1920 Laska Jimsen <laska@temple.edu> Protect Public Forests, Rivers and Wildlife 1/2/2008 18:03:53 Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue Portland, Oregon
Portland, OR 97208

CC: Oregon Congressional delegation

Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions

Dear BLM,

I am a native Oregonian, recently transplanted to Philadelphia
for graduate school. As an Oregonian, I treasure our forests
and hope to preserve that legacy for my children and
grandchildren.

I am very concerned with the direction the Bush Administration
is headed in with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres
of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions.
The changes that the BLM is contemplating will unravel the
protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and may
lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased
conflict and controversy.

Your current proposal is unacceptable. The agency proposes to
increase old-growth logging on public lands in western Oregon
by 700%, build 1,000 miles of new logging road in the next
decade and clearcut at a 9-1 ratio to thinning. This is a
myopic and backwards proposal that depletes our natural
resource base for future generations by weakening protections
for forests, creeks and salmon. Shockingly, the proposal
ignores the role that these forests play in regulating the
climate.

Most Americans want federal land managers to embrace thinning
second growth forests, safeguard communities from wildfire and
protect what remains of our nation's ancient forests. By
focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of
which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - they are
providing wood to local mills while actually improving
conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of
precious old-growth forests.

In contrast, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by
increasing old-growth clear-cutting for a short-term economic
fix. The WOPR puts water quality at-risk and would destroy
some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our
remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not
clear-cut these natural treasures as the WOPR proposes to do.

It is disappointing that at a time when public consensus for
old-growth protection and second-growth thinning has never
been stronger, the BLM is proposing to clear-cut forests older
than our nation and turn complex ecosystems into flammable
tree farms.

Please protect remaining old-growth forests, focus active
management of BLM lands in already logged-over areas, and
concentrate job opportunities in restoration forestry that
would benefit watersheds and generate wood products without
multiplying past mistakes.

Sincerely,

Laska Jimsen
3721 Spring Garden St.
Philadelphia, PA 19104
EM-1921 Karin Engstrom <kengstrom@seanet.com> Protect BLM Forests 1/2/2008 18:35:56 Bureau of Land Management
Oregon/Washington State Office
ATTN: Western Oregon Planning Revision (OR930.1)
PO Box 2965
Portland, Oregon 97208

Dear BLM,

Please accept these comments on the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. I am a citizen concerned with the management of these lands.

For the last ten years, the Bureau of Land Management administered forests in western Oregon under the Northwest Forest Plan. This ensured these forests continued to provide important public values. These forests can also provide jobs and wood products as a by-product of forest restoration such as thinning young plantation forests.

I am concerned that the changes the BLM is contemplating may lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy. Many of these forests are currently protected for water quality, salmon and wildlife concerns.

Much of the BLM forests in western Oregon are adjacent to private landowners who would like to see nearby forest managed to protect their home from wildfire and to preserve their water supply, scenery, and recreation opportunities.

Learn from the terrible floods that occurred recently in Washington. The over logging of forested areas contributed to the damage affecting so many people. The damage is long term. Farmers will not recover their losses for years - if at all. Communities are impacted long after the public has moved on to another weather disaster.

If there weren't alternatives to the logging, particularly of old growth, initiating this proposal might have some strength - but we need to move on and convert our resource extraction industries toward more sustainable and renewable production techniques. The BLM has an opportunity to promote and encourage these practices.

Please continue to protect the western BLM forests that are now protected.

Sincerely,

Career & College Specialist Karin Engstrom
Career & College Specialist
PO Box 84245
Seattle, WA 98124

206.937.2605
EM-1922 joseph lian <ancientpeace@hotmail.com> Protect Public Forests, Rivers and Wildlife 1/2/2008 21:57:28 Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue Portland, Oregon
Portland, OR 97208

CC: Oregon Congressional delegation

Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions

Dear BLM,

I am very concerned with the direction the Bush Administration is
headed in with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal
forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes that the
BLM is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark
Northwest Forest Plan, and may lead to water pollution, degraded
habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Your current proposal is unacceptable. The agency proposes to
increase old-growth logging on public lands in western Oregon by
700%, build 1,000 miles of new logging road in the next decade and
clearcut at a 9-1 ratio to thinning. This is a myopic and backwards
proposal that depletes our natural resource base for future
generations by weakening protections for forests, creeks and salmon.
Shockingly, the proposal ignores the role that these forests play in
regulating the climate.

Most Americans want federal land managers to embrace thinning second
growth forests, safeguard communities from wildfire and protect what
remains of our nation's ancient forests. By focusing on previously
logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in
need of thinning - they are providing wood to local mills while
actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws
out of precious old-growth forests.

In contrast, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by
increasing old-growth clear-cutting for a short-term economic fix.
The WOPR puts water quality at-risk and would destroy some of
Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature
and old-growth forests on public land, not clear-cut these natural
treasures as the WOPR proposes to do.

It is disappointing that at a time when public consensus for old-
growth protection and second-growth thinning has never been stronger,
the BLM is proposing to clear-cut forests older than our nation and
turn complex ecosystems into flammable tree farms.

Please protect remaining old-growth forests, focus active management
of BLM lands in already logged-over areas, and concentrate job
opportunities in restoration forestry that would benefit watersheds
and generate wood products without multiplying past mistakes.

Sincerely,

ANNA LAYA LIAN
P.O. BOX 315 WILLIAMS, OR 97544
EM-1923 joseph lian <ancientpeace@hotmail.com> Protect Public Forests, Rivers and Wildlife 1/2/2008 21:58:45 Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue Portland, Oregon
Portland, OR 97208

CC: Oregon Congressional delegation

Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions

Dear BLM,

I am very concerned with the direction the Bush Administration is
headed in with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal
forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes that the
BLM is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark
Northwest Forest Plan, and may lead to water pollution, degraded
habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Your current proposal is unacceptable. The agency proposes to
increase old-growth logging on public lands in western Oregon by
700%, build 1,000 miles of new logging road in the next decade and
clearcut at a 9-1 ratio to thinning. This is a myopic and backwards
proposal that depletes our natural resource base for future
generations by weakening protections for forests, creeks and salmon.
Shockingly, the proposal ignores the role that these forests play in
regulating the climate.

Most Americans want federal land managers to embrace thinning second
growth forests, safeguard communities from wildfire and protect what
remains of our nation's ancient forests. By focusing on previously
logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in
need of thinning - they are providing wood to local mills while
actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws
out of precious old-growth forests.

In contrast, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by
increasing old-growth clear-cutting for a short-term economic fix.
The WOPR puts water quality at-risk and would destroy some of
Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature
and old-growth forests on public land, not clear-cut these natural
treasures as the WOPR proposes to do.

It is disappointing that at a time when public consensus for old-
growth protection and second-growth thinning has never been stronger,
the BLM is proposing to clear-cut forests older than our nation and
turn complex ecosystems into flammable tree farms.

Please protect remaining old-growth forests, focus active management
of BLM lands in already logged-over areas, and concentrate job
opportunities in restoration forestry that would benefit watersheds
and generate wood products without multiplying past mistakes.

Sincerely,

JOSEPH LIAN
P.O. BOX 315
WILLIAMS, OR 97544
EM-1924 Alysia Hansen <alysia@medicineflower.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 1/2/2008 22:08:22 Dear BLM,
I live in Oregon for a variety of reasons, including the old-growth forests, excellent recreation, and opportunities to view wildlife on public lands. After learning about the BLM's Western Oregon Plan Revisions, I am very concerned this plan will degrade my ability to enjoy the public lands in western Oregon. The changes the Bureau of Land Management is proposing will unravel the protections of the Northwest Forest Plan for old-growth forests and wildlife, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Some of my concerns include:
- I'm disappointed that all special areas (Research Natural Areas and Areas of Critical Environmental Concern) won't be protected from logging under WOPR. These areas contain unique values that many people seek out to enjoy. These areas should not be opened to logging.

- The increased, widespread clearcutting of forests under WOPR could reduce property values and the quality of life of thousands of Oregonians living near BLM lands. Over 1,000 miles of new logging road and 140,000 acres of clearcuts in the first decade alone would scar Oregon's spectacular landscape.

- Clearcutting of old growth forests and proposed "Off Highway Vehicle Emphasis Areas" threaten the peace and quiet for rural residents, visitors, and wildlife. Oregon needs rural residents and tourism to feed our economy - catering to the timber and motorized vehicle industry alone is not a solution.

Oregon's remaining old-growth forests are a treasure -- offering wonderful recreation opportunities, clean water, homes for wildlife, and offsetting global warming. But the WOPR is a step back to the unsustainable days of clear-cutting this amazing resource, endangering wildlife, muddying streams, and fueling public outcry. A better way is to protect our heritage forests and focus on thinning and restoration of the plentiful unhealthy plantations left over from the last logging boom. This approach would safeguard the many values of old-growth forests that make Oregon a place I want to live, while providing sustainable jobs and other economic benefits for rural communities.

Thank you for hearing the people and saving our old growth forests and our natural heritage of beauty, health and grace.

Alysia Hansen
990 Grays Creek Road
Grants Pass, OR 97527
EM-1925 R Renee Dolney <radst46@netscape.net> More areas merit wilderness recommendation 1/3/2008 4:02:02 January 02, 2008

BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue
Portland, OR 97204


Dear BLM Western Oregon Plan Revision,

I am writing to urge a reevaluation and expansion of the areas that should be
recommended as wilderness in the Western Oregon Plan Revision (WOPR). The Bureau
of Land Management�s (BLM) preferred alternative recommends only five areas,
despite a total of 146 inventoried areas in the lands managed by the plan. The
BLM�s process for evaluating and determining wilderness resources and wilderness
recommendations in the WOPR was inadequate, resulting in many well-known wild
places exhibiting excellent wilderness characteristics being improperly omitted.

The Wild Rogue Additions is a prime example of an area that clearly meets the
criteria for wilderness recommendation, and yet was not recommended. In the Wild
Rogue North Watershed Analysis, the BLM itself noted the value of the large, roadless
areas for aesthetics, solitude, undeveloped recreational opportunities, wildlife,
fisheries, water quality, and the intrinsic value of having wild, undeveloped
places (see Version 2.0 of this analysis, issued in December 1999 and available
online: http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/medford/plans/files/wild_rogue_north_wa_acc.pdf).
Despite these findings, BLM omits the Wild Rogue from its wilderness recommendations.

BLM�s analysis and recommendations must take into account the economic importance
of wilderness as well as the non-commercial values of the public lands it stewards,
instead of considering lands primarily for their timber values. This approach
demonstrates an unbalanced interpretation of the BLM�s legal obligations, and
must be reviewed. Additional areas that should be recommended for wilderness protection
include Reuben Creek, Williams Creek, Wild Rogue Additions, Whiskey Creek, Wellington
Mountain, Clackamas Wilderness � Bull of the Woods/Opal Creek Additions, and
Coast Range Wilderness - Wasson Creek.

The WOPR is a heavily forested area, and contains rare old growth with trees
that stood before our nation existed. Many of these deserving wild lands should
be recommended as wilderness to preserve these ancient giants and the beautiful
landscapes that surround them. Failure to protect these increasingly endangered
wild places from timber harvest is a mistake that cannot be undone once the old
growth trees have been cleared. I urge BLM to reexamine its wilderness recommendations
in the WOPR, and to expand the recommendations to include the wild places listed
above that should be managed to maintain their wilderness characteristics.

Sincerely,

R Renee Dolney
2315 Orlando Pl
Pittsburgh, PA 15235-2768
USA
radst46@netscape.net


EM-1926 Bobbie <cjjiggy@yahoo.com> Stop WOPR-Protect BLM forests 1/3/2008 7:40:39 I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks.
Sincerely,
 
Bobbie Hupp



Looking for last minute shopping deals? Find them fast with Yahoo! Search.
EM-1927 <smallrevolution@peoplepc.com> WOPR and OHV 1/3/2008 8:56:48 Tim,  

We purchased land and moved here for retirement, peace and quiet.  In fact noise is a medical issue for my partner.  Given our location, the quiet and views contribute to our land value and were certainly part of the value included in the price we paid. Pure water was also a reason we purchased this property.  Now under WOPR, the BLM wants to log our views, not in a reasonable way, but clear cut or virtual clear cut, risk our water quality, and let OHVs destroy our quite, quality of life and health, and our property values, and leave us at a higher risk for fire.   

The area included in the WOPR/OHV plan includes streams and rivers that produce clean water and salmon, recreation areas, scenic vistas, and some of America's last remaining ancient forests.   The WOPR would dramatically increase clearcut logging, establish noisy Off Highway Vehicle parks, and prioritize timber and OHV use at the expense of virtually all other life sustaining and community values. 

Pepper Trail, biologist and contributor to Writers on the Range, 10/07 states:  "BLM's preferred alternative offers Oregonthe worst fire future.  Alternative would accomplish almost all its logging by clearcutting, creating even-aged plantations without any standing large trees. This plan fails that fire test.  If it is adopted, we will all get burned."

I oppose the WOPR and the plan to designate massive OHV areas.  I am opposed to any OHV areas in populated areas were people reside, or without objective (the EPA, like the BLM and NFS no longer manage for Americans but for Corporations, thus an objective study must come from outside these orgs) scientific study of the environmental impact.

 

Mary Birmingham

 
EM-1928 Timothy Powell <timpowell1954@comcast.net> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 1/3/2008 9:42:46 I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by the
Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving forward with
the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in Oregon's
old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in currently protected old
growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks.

Sincerely,

Delpha Powell
819 6th St.
Oregon City, OR 97045

EM-1929 Gary Hultman <ghultman@outreachinternet.com> Protect Public Forests, Rivers and Wildlife 1/3/2008 9:48:15 Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st.
Avenue Portland, Oregon
Portland, OR 97208

CC: Oregon Congressional
delegation

Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions

Dear BLM,

I am very
concerned with the direction the Bush Administration is headed in with the
management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western
Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes that the BLM is contemplating will
unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and may lead
to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and
controversy.

Your current proposal is unacceptable. The agency proposes to
increase old-growth logging on public lands in western Oregon by 700%, build
1,000 miles of new logging road in the next decade and clearcut at a 9-1
ratio to thinning. This is a myopic and backwards proposal that depletes our
natural resource base for future generations by weakening protections for
forests, creeks and salmon. Shockingly, the proposal ignores the role that
these forests play in regulating the climate.

Most Americans want federal
land managers to embrace thinning second growth forests, safeguard
communities from wildfire and protect what remains of our nation's ancient
forests. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which
are now overgrown and in need of thinning - they are providing wood to local
mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping
saws out of precious old-growth forests.

In contrast, the WOPR proposes to
inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clear-cutting for a
short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at-risk and would
destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our
remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clear-cut these
natural treasures as the WOPR proposes to do.

It is disappointing that at a
time when public consensus for old-growth protection and second-growth
thinning has never been stronger, the BLM is proposing to clear-cut forests
older than our nation and turn complex ecosystems into flammable tree
farms.

Please protect remaining old-growth forests, focus active management
of BLM lands in already logged-over areas, and concentrate job opportunities
in restoration forestry that would benefit watersheds and generate wood
products without multiplying past mistakes.

Sincerely,
Nancy Hultman, 300
Limpy Creek Road, Grants Pass, OR, 97527


EM-1930 Gary Hultman <ghultman@outreachinternet.com> Protect Public Forests, Rivers and Wildlife 1/3/2008 9:50:33 Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st.
Avenue Portland, Oregon
Portland, OR 97208

CC: Oregon Congressional
delegation

Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions

Dear BLM,

I am very
concerned with the direction the Bush Administration is headed in with the
management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western
Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes that the BLM is contemplating will
unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and may lead
to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and
controversy.

Your current proposal is unacceptable. The agency proposes to
increase old-growth logging on public lands in western Oregon by 700%, build
1,000 miles of new logging road in the next decade and clearcut at a 9-1
ratio to thinning. This is a myopic and backwards proposal that depletes our
natural resource base for future generations by weakening protections for
forests, creeks and salmon. Shockingly, the proposal ignores the role that
these forests play in regulating the climate.

Most Americans want federal
land managers to embrace thinning second growth forests, safeguard
communities from wildfire and protect what remains of our nation's ancient
forests. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which
are now overgrown and in need of thinning - they are providing wood to local
mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping
saws out of precious old-growth forests.

In contrast, the WOPR proposes to
inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clear-cutting for a
short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at-risk and would
destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our
remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clear-cut these
natural treasures as the WOPR proposes to do.

It is disappointing that at a
time when public consensus for old-growth protection and second-growth
thinning has never been stronger, the BLM is proposing to clear-cut forests
older than our nation and turn complex ecosystems into flammable tree
farms.

Please protect remaining old-growth forests, focus active management
of BLM lands in already logged-over areas, and concentrate job opportunities
in restoration forestry that would benefit watersheds and generate wood
products without multiplying past mistakes.

Sincerely,
Gary Hultman, 300
Limpy Creek Road, Grants Pass, OR 97527


EM-1931 J.D. Kuhlman <kuhljak@verizon.net> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 1/3/2008 9:51:09 I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clear cutting in currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks.

Sincerely,

J.D. Kuhlman

19225 SW Baseline Road

Beaverton, OR 97006
EM-1932 Jennifer Kahal <jenkahal@yahoo.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 1/3/2008 10:00:42 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Jennifer Kahal
970 Grays Creek
Grants Pass, OR 97527
EM-1933 Jonathan Evans <juanito_evans@yahoo.com> Change the WOPR direction 1/3/2008 10:28:28 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Jonathan Evans
1404 Ocean Park Blvd.
Santa Monica, CA 90405
EM-1934 Erin C. Ganahl <eganahl@angellaw.com> Protect Oregon's old-growth forests 1/3/2008 10:34:39 Dear BLM,
As a former long-time resident of Oregon and an environmental attorney, I am extremely concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of almost 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes contemplated by the agency will unravel the important protections of the Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, increased conflict and controversy, and threats to human life and health.

Western Oregon's BLM lands contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Erin C. Ganahl
2601 Ocean Park
Santa Monica, CA 90405
EM-1935 Andrew Orahoske <ecolaw@gmail.com> Please protect our old-growth forests! 1/3/2008 11:04:13 Dear BLM,
I am very concerned with the direction the BLM is headed with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes the agency is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and will lead to water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

BLM lands in western Oregon contain about 1-million acres of our remaining older forests. The WOPR would increase logging of forests over 200 years sevenfold, and threatens some of Oregon's best remaining ancient forests. Two thousand square miles of forest would be put in "Timber Management Areas," where clearcutting is emphasized.

By logging closer to streams the WOPR reduces important protections for clean water and Pacific salmon. High quality drinking water originates on BLM lands for the citizens of Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, and 70 other Oregon communities. Salmon need cool, clean water, but the WOPR would remove stream buffers that shade streams and keep sediment from the water. Please leave the existing protections for riparian areas in place.

Wildlife such as elk and black bear and threatened species like the northern spotted owl and the marbled murrelet rely on BLM forests. The WOPR would reduce protections for wildlife populations and diminish habitat for countless plant and wildlife species. Please choose an alternative that leaves habitat protections for wildlife, especially in existing old-growth forests, in place.

There are many less sensitive and more practical places to generate wood fiber than our last remaining ancient forests, like the millions of acres of young, even-age tree plantations that have grown since previous clearcuts. By focusing on previously logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in need of thinning - the BLM would provide wood to local mills while actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious old-growth forests.

Instead, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by increasing old-growth clearcutting for a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality at risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-growth forests on public land, not clearcut these natural treasures.

Andrew Orahoske
2000 Missoula Ave
Missoula, MT 59802
EM-1936 K J SIMILA <similand@msn.com> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 1/3/2008 11:12:12  
I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks.

Sincerely,

Kendrick Simila
1810 - 20th Street NE
Salem OR  97301
EM-1937 Don Tipping <sevenseedsfarm@yahoo.com> WOPR 1/3/2008 11:22:19 Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan
Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue Portland, Oregon
Portland, OR 97208

CC: Oregon Congressional delegation

Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions

Dear BLM,

I am very concerned with the direction the Bush
Administration is headed in with the management of
nearly 2.6 million acres of federal forests under the
Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes that the
BLM is contemplating will unravel the protections of
the landmark Northwest Forest Plan, and may lead to
water pollution, degraded habitat, and increased
conflict and controversy.

Your current proposal is unacceptable. The agency
proposes to increase old-growth logging on public
lands in western Oregon by 700%, build 1,000 miles of
new logging road in the next decade and clearcut at a
9-1 ratio to thinning. This is a myopic and backwards
proposal that depletes our natural resource base for
future generations by weakening protections for
forests, creeks and salmon. Shockingly, the proposal
ignores the role that these forests play in regulating
the climate.

Most Americans want federal land managers to embrace
thinning second growth forests, safeguard communities
from wildfire and protect what remains of our nation's
ancient forests. By focusing on previously logged
public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown
and in need of thinning - they are providing wood to
local mills while actually improving conditions for
fish and wildlife and keeping saws out of precious
old-growth forests.

In contrast, the WOPR proposes to inflame the
controversy by increasing old-growth clear-cutting for
a short-term economic fix. The WOPR puts water quality
at-risk and would destroy some of Oregon's most
special places. We should protect our remaining mature
and old-growth forests on public land, not clear-cut
these natural treasures as the WOPR proposes to do.

It is disappointing that at a time when public
consensus for old-growth protection and second-growth
thinning has never been stronger, the BLM is proposing
to clear-cut forests older than our nation and turn
complex ecosystems into flammable tree farms.

Please protect remaining old-growth forests, focus
active management of BLM lands in already logged-over
areas, and concentrate job opportunities in
restoration forestry that would benefit watersheds and
generate wood products without multiplying past
mistakes.

Sincerely,

Don Tipping
Seven Seeds Farm 3220 East Fork
Williasms, OR 97544


____________________________________________________________________________________
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EM-1938 Bonnie Johnson <blj_flag@yahoo.com> WOPR - Protect Public Forests, Rivers and Wildlife 1/3/2008 11:46:51 Bureau of Land Management, Western Oregon Plan Revisions Office
333 SW 1st. Avenue Portland, Oregon
Portland, OR 97208

CC: Oregon Congressional delegation

Re: BLM Western Oregon Plan Revisions

Dear BLM,

All the Alternatives in the WOPR ignore the 146 public proposed
Wilderness Areas for Oregon public lands. Of the minimum of 9
proposed wilderness areas that meet the BLM's extremely restrictive
criteria, still only 5 would be protected from "regeneration harvest",
your name for clear-cutting. This would be a fatal setback for
preserving biodiversity and the healthy watershed and wildlife
habitat, which humanity will need for future medicines and climate
change adjustments. It is beyond short-sighted to turn our rich,
beautiful public lands into monoculture tree farms. We can never in
our lifetime get back the biological resources that will be destroyed
by the WOPR. Species extinction is forever.
As a resident in WIlliams, OR, I especially urge you to give the
utmost consideration to the Wild Rogue wilderness proposal along with
all the other proposals, and prepare a thorough, scientific DEIS. My
scientist husband is submitting a very detailed comment on the whole
WOPR - he has actually read every bit of it! The increased ORV use
is detrimental in every way to wildlife, soils, erosion, noise and air
pollution. When gas is $10.00 a gallon, ORV users may be forced to
get bicycles instead, so please don't sacrifice our national lands NOW
to this unnecessary abuse.
I am very concerned with the direction the Bush Administration is
headed in with the management of nearly 2.6 million acres of federal
forests under the Western Oregon Plan Revisions. The changes that the
BLM is contemplating will unravel the protections of the landmark
Northwest Forest Plan, and may lead to water pollution, degraded
habitat, and increased conflict and controversy.

Your current proposal is unacceptable. The agency proposes to increase
old-growth logging on public lands in western Oregon by 700%, build
1,000 miles of new logging road in the next decade and clearcut at a
9-1 ratio to thinning. This is a myopic and backwards proposal that
depletes our natural resource base for future generations by weakening
protections for forests, creeks and salmon. Shockingly, the proposal
ignores the role that these forests play in regulating the climate.

Most Americans want federal land managers to embrace thinning second
growth forests, safeguard communities from wildfire and protect what
remains of our nation's ancient forests. By focusing on previously
logged public forestlands - many of which are now overgrown and in
need of thinning - they are providing wood to local mills while
actually improving conditions for fish and wildlife and keeping saws
out of precious old-growth forests.

In contrast, the WOPR proposes to inflame the controversy by
increasing old-growth clear-cutting for a short-term economic fix. The
WOPR puts water quality at-risk and would destroy some of Oregon's
most special places. We should protect our remaining mature and old-
growth forests on public land, not clear-cut these natural treasures
as the WOPR proposes to do.

It is disappointing that at a time when public consensus for old-
growth protection and second-growth thinning has never been stronger,
the BLM is proposing to clear-cut forests older than our nation and
turn complex ecosystems into flammable tree farms.

Please protect remaining old-growth forests, focus active management
of BLM lands in already logged-over areas, and concentrate job
opportunities in restoration forestry that would benefit watersheds
and generate wood products without multiplying past mistakes.

Sincerely,

Mrs. Bonnie L. Johnson
16282 Water Gap ROad
Williams, OR 97544-9562

541-846-6016
EM-1939 anne lubischer <annejim1@verizon.net> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 1/3/2008 12:16:15 1-2-08

United States Bureau of Land Management,

The present plan ("Western Oregon Plan Revision") by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to devastate 2.6 million acres of forest in Oregonfor commercial gain is short sighted.  The proposed logging of these areas will adversely affect our watersheds and damage our Salmon runs.  If this logging occurs, we will not only lose critical Old Growth habitat but the majesty that accompanies these ecosystems.  These are our public forests, these are my forests.  The major timber companies have millions of acres of forestland but they have pillaged their lands for quick profit.  They could have had sustainable production on their lands but they chose not to.  Now they want to continue to take from our public forests (and we subsidize them to do it too).  These timber companies try to tell us how responsible stewards they are by telling us how many millions of trees they will plant in order to somehow make us think that they are righting the wrong of cutting these forests down.  Not one of their commercials, however, tells us how many board feet of lumber their "reforestation seedlings" consist of.  I would venture to say that all of their seedlings combined would not even equal one old growth, irreplaceable fir tree.  Please keep our public forests public and not allow them to be cut and in many instances exported overseas to make paper.  The BLM is charged with managing our public forests.  For too many years the timber companies have gotten their way so that now we have only perhaps less than 5% of our old growth forests remaining.  I think that "harvesting" 95% of our old growth forests should be enough for these timber companies.  How about leaving the remaining few percent for the public.

Thank you,

Jim Lubischer   

22720 NW Quatama

Hillsboro, Or 97124
EM-1940 Erica Goldsmith <egoldsm1@uoregon.edu> the whopper! 1/3/2008 13:18:50 Hi, I wanted to write and ask that you change or suspend your plan to log the heritage forests of Oregon. My sweet young daughter needs these forests to breathe fresh air and grow to her ultimate potential. She does not need logged forests, dirty air and only pictures of what used to be pristine wilderness. Please find it in your hearts to pay no mind to the money and heed, instead our shared vision for a clean environment in which all our children and grandchildren can thrive in. Thank you, Erica Goldsmith, Eugene, Oregon.
EM-1941 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 1/3/2008 13:29:19 Dear Western Oregon BLM,I am writing to express my concern over the
possible elimination of old-growth and streamside reserves on western
Oregon BLM lands. These forests provide habitat for many wildlife
species, clean drinking water to rural communities, recreation for
outdoor enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations. With so
few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we protect them
for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree plantations
are a sustainable place for generating wood products. Please do not
open older forests on our public lands to logging. Sincerely,

Name: Marilyn Kamna
Street: 7655 ASH ST
City,_State,_Zip: Grand Ronde, OR 97347
Email_Address: skyeart@gmail.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1942 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 1/3/2008 13:29:51 Dear Western Oregon BLM,I am writing to express my concern over the
possible elimination of old-growth and streamside reserves on western
Oregon BLM lands. These forests provide habitat for many wildlife
species, clean drinking water to rural communities, recreation for
outdoor enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations. With so
few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we protect them
for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree plantations
are a sustainable place for generating wood products. Please do not
open older forests on our public lands to logging. Sincerely,

Name: Jan Roberts
Street: 6601 Fredonia
City,_State,_Zip: Las Vegas, NV
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1943 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 1/3/2008 13:30:19 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide critical habitat for endangered species and
other wildlife, clean air and water for rural communities, and
pristine places for hiking and enjoying the beauty of nature.

With so few old-growth forests remaining and so many of our
watersheds already threatened by unsustainable logging practices, it
is imperative that we act now to permanently protect these lands.

Please do not open old-growth forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Name: Amy Balint
Street: 970 W. 3rd Ave
City,_State,_Zip: Eugene, OR
Email_Address: foglark@gmail.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1944 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 1/3/2008 13:30:43 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Name: Philip Simon
Street: Box 9473
City,_State,_Zip: San rafael, Ca. 94912
Email_Address: philsimtpr@aol.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1945 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 1/3/2008 13:31:12 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Name: kendra cochran
Street: 48841 santiam highway
City,_State,_Zip: Cascadia OR 97329
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1946 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 1/3/2008 13:31:59 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Name: stuart phillips
Street: 212 benjamin
City,_State,_Zip: eugene, oregon, 97404
Email_Address: stulips@hotmail.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1947 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 1/3/2008 13:32:24 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Name: Lucy Mead
Street: 869 Fairway View Dr
City,_State,_Zip: Eugene, OR , 97401
Email_Address: lucy8@mindspring.com
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1948 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 1/3/2008 13:33:27 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I do not want any more old-growth forests logged. There are hardly
any of these splendid and necessary forests left and they cannot be
replaced for several generations, and most likely never at all. It
is totally unconscionable to cut these intact ecosystems when they
are just a remnant of the vast forests that used to be. There is
abolutely no excusable reason to cut old growth. The only people to
gain from this would be a few lumbar companies and only for a short
time (an extremely miniscule portion of the population). The losers
would be everyone else, as well as clean water, animals, birds, and
the peace of mind of people who care that these forests exist. There
are plenty of tree-plantation areas that need to be thinned, if you
must cut on public land, although it would be better if you didn't.
The Northwest Forest Plan is already a compromise. It should
definitely not be changed in favor of more logging, more road
building, destruction of riparian habitats.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Carol Stern
369 West D Street #1
Springfield, Oregon 97477
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1949 Josh Laughlin <jlaughlin@cascwild.org> WOPR comment 1/3/2008 13:33:55 Dear Western Oregon BLM,

I am writing to express my concern over the possible elimination of
old-growth and streamside reserves on western Oregon BLM lands.
These forests provide habitat for many wildlife species, clean
drinking water to rural communities, recreation for outdoor
enthusiasts, and a legacy for future generations.

With so few old-growth forests remaining, it is critical that we
protect them for future generations to enjoy. Young, even-age tree
plantations are a sustainable place for generating wood products.

Please do not open older forests on our public lands to logging.

Sincerely,


Name: Paul Safar
Street: 1885 Friendly St
City,_State,_Zip: Eugene,OR 97402
Email_Address: cblossom@efn.org
--
Josh Laughlin, Conservation Director
Cascadia Wildlands Project
P.O. Box 10455
Eugene, OR 97440
541.434.1463 (voice)
541.434.6494 (fax)

The Cascadia Wildlands Project is dedicated to defending the forests,
waters, and wildlife of the Pacific Northwest. Visit www.cascwild.org
to learn more about wildlands issues and our leadership in the
conservation movement. Become a member today at
http://www.cascwild.org/donate.html. Your support makes a difference!
EM-1950 Karen <cocreate@spiritone.com> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 1/3/2008 16:20:57  
I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks.

Sincerely,
Karen Mitzner, 136 SE 63rd, Portland OR 97215
YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS
EM-1951 Karen <cocreate@spiritone.com> Stop WOPR - Protect BLM forests 1/3/2008 16:21:11  
I am very concerned about the 2.6 million acres of forest managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon. The BLM is moving forward with the Western Oregon Plan Revision, which will increase logging in Oregon's old-growth forests sevenfold by clearcutting in currently protected old growth forest reserves and sensitive salmon bearing rivers and creeks.

Sincerely,

YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS
EM-1952 Carsten Schemel <Schemels1@comcast.net> Western Oregon Plan Revisions 1/3/2008 17:02:03 January 3, 2008
Western Oregon Plan Revisions


Dear Western Oregon Plan Revisions,

As a sportsman in western Oregon, I am deeply concerned with the Bureau of Land
Management's recently released draft version of the Western Oregon Plan Revisions.
The plans outlined in the document would dramatically alter public lands management
in western Oregon to the detriment of fish and wildlife and, by extension, hunting
and fishing.

I frequently visit Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon, and I'm
worried the BLM's plan would have a significant impact on my ability to hunt and
fish in this region, and, more importantly, my ability to pass down my sporting
heritage to the next generation of hunters and anglers in western Oregon.

For example, reduction of streamside buffers to 25 feet would most certainly
have a negative impact on our trout and salmon fisheries throughout the region.
Timber harvest in close vicinity to fish-bearing or fish-spawning waters will
contribute sediment to the systems, with the potential to smother fish eggs and
spawning gravel. Additionally, removing streamside vegetation will reduce cover
and likely result in temperature increases that could prove fatal to our fisheries.

What's more, plans to construct about 1,000 miles of new roads over the next
decade, and to allow 14,000 acres of clearcut logging annually could have drastic
impacts on the region's struggling, but recovering, fisheries.

Add in the conversion of our low-elevation oak savanna forests to conifer plantations
and the creation of new off-highway-vehicle emphasis areas, and the plan becomes
detrimental to our big-game herds and upland game bird populations.

In short, the Western Oregon Plan Revisions are unacceptable from a hunting
and angling standpoint. Ideally, the BLM would offer a full range of alternatives
when it comes to the plan revisions, with all of those alternatives providing
some measure of fish and wildlife protection.

Finally, off-highway vehicle management should not be addressed at the region-wide
level, but rather by individual BLM districts, and with a generous opportunity
for public comment at the local level.

Sincerely

Carsten Schemel
6950 SW Netarts Ct
Beaverton, OR 97007-7828

EM-1953 Lawrence Nagel <nagel@mind.net> Western Oregon Plan Revisions 1/3/2008 17:02:03 January 3, 2008
Western Oregon Plan Revisions


Dear Western Oregon Plan Revisions,

As a sportsman in western Oregon, I am deeply concerned with the Bureau of Land
Management's recently released draft version of the Western Oregon Plan Revisions.
The plans outlined in the document would dramatically alter public lands management
in western Oregon to the detriment of fish and wildlife and, by extension, hunting
and fishing.

I frequently visit Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon, and I'm
worried the BLM's plan would have a significant impact on my ability to hunt and
fish in this region, and, more importantly, my ability to pass down my sporting
heritage to the next generation of hunters and anglers in western Oregon.

For example, reduction of streamside buffers to 25 feet would most certainly
have a negative impact on our trout and salmon fisheries throughout the region.
Timber harvest in close vicinity to fish-bearing or fish-spawning waters will
contribute sediment to the systems, with the potential to smother fish eggs and
spawning gravel. Additionally, removing streamside vegetation will reduce cover
and likely result in temperature increases that could prove fatal to our fisheries.

What's more, plans to construct about 1,000 miles of new roads over the next
decade, and to allow 14,000 acres of clearcut logging annually could have drastic
impacts on the region's struggling, but recovering, fisheries.

Add in the conversion of our low-elevation oak savanna forests to conifer plantations
and the creation of new off-highway-vehicle emphasis areas, and the plan becomes
detrimental to our big-game herds and upland game bird populations.

In short, the Western Oregon Plan Revisions are unacceptable from a hunting
and angling standpoint. Ideally, the BLM would offer a full range of alternatives
when it comes to the plan revisions, with all of those alternatives providing
some measure of fish and wildlife protection.

Finally, off-highway vehicle management should not be addressed at the region-wide
level, but rather by individual BLM districts, and with a generous opportunity
for public comment at the local level.

Sincerely

Lawrence Nagel
375 Ashland Loop Rd
Ashland, OR 97520-2803

EM-1954 Karl Mueller <karlrmueller@hotmail.com> Western Oregon Plan Revisions 1/3/2008 17:02:04 January 3, 2008
Western Oregon Plan Revisions


Dear Western Oregon Plan Revisions,

As a sportsman in western Oregon, I am deeply concerned with the Bureau of Land
Management's recently released draft version of the Western Oregon Plan Revisions.
The plans outlined in the document would dramatically alter public lands management
in western Oregon to the detriment of fish and wildlife and, by extension, hunting
and fishing.

I frequently visit Bureau of Land Management land in western Oregon, and I'm
worried the BLM's plan would have a significant impact on my ability to hunt and
fish in this region, and, more importantly, my ability to pass down my sporting
heritage to the next generation of hunters and anglers in western Oregon.

For example, reduction of streamside buffers to 25 feet would most certainly
have a negative impact on our trout and salmon fisheries throughout the region.
Timber harvest in close vicinity to fish-bearing or fish-spawning waters will
contribute sediment to the systems, with the potential to smother fish eggs and
spawning gravel. Additionally, removing streamside vegetation will reduce cover
and likely result in temperature increases that could prove fatal to our fisheries.

What's more, plans to construct about 1,000 miles of new roads over the next
decade, and to allow 14,000 acres of clearcut logging annually could have drastic
impacts on the region's struggling, but recovering, fisheries.

Add in the conversion of our low-elevation oak savanna forests to conifer plantations
and the creation of new off-highway-vehicle emphasis areas, and the plan becomes
detrimental to our big-game herds and upland game bird populations.

In short, the Western Oregon Plan Revisions are unacceptable from a hunting
and angling standpoint. Ideally, the BLM would offer a f