Table 4 - Buffering of Special Habitats


Special Habitat   Buffer (feet)
Natural Ponds/lakes/vernal pools/slump ponds
Constructed water bodies > 1 acre
  1-2 site trees or 300' slope distance (ROD, p. 9)
1 site tree or 150' slope distance (ROD, C-30, p. 9)
Bogs, Swamps   1 site tree or 100' slope distance (ROD, C-31)
Mesic (wet) Meadows/Prairie   1 site tree or 100' slope distance (ROD, C-31)
Moist Rock Gardens   1 site tree or 100' slope distance (ROD, C-31)
Dry Rock Gardens, Dry Meadows/prairie   100' to 200'
Rock Outcrops, Talus habitats   100' to 200'
Caves, Rock Overhangs   250' (if occupied by bats) (SEIS, p. D-10) or 100-200'
Mines   250' (if occupied by bats) (SEIS, p. D-10) or 100-200'
Man-made structures (bridges, buildings)   250' (if occupied by bats) (SEIS, p. D-10) or 100-200'
Mineral deposits
(e.g., mineral springs, salt licks, etc.)
  100-200' (or as required under wetland in SEIS/ROD)
Other unique vegetative types, geological features, and small patches of diverse habitat that occur within larger areas of more homogeneous habitat and that have special value to wildlife or plants (including sand dunes/coastal deflation plains, ponderosa pine stands, oak and oak woodlands, ash swales, cottonwood patches, madrone woodlands, etc.) will be maintained throughout the landscape as compatible with land use objectives and special status species management. No inventories of these areas have been conducted with wildlife or plant requirements in mind, although TPCC areas have been delineated for timber purposes. As additional field work is conducted and unique areas are located, they will be identified as special habitats (BLM manual 6602.12D) and incorporated into watershed analysis. Although no standard buffer is recommended for these types, buffers are one of many management techniques that may be suggested through watershed analysis to maintain or protect the values that make these areas unique. See Chapter 3 description.