Coos Bay Record of Decision and Resource Management Plan

Acronyms and Abbreviations

Coos Bay Record of Decision

Coos Bay District Resource Management Plan Table of Contents:

- Tables

- Figures

- Maps

- Appendices

Wildlife Habitat


Objectives

See objectives for Late-Successional Reserves, Riparian Reserves, and the Matrix.

Enhance and maintain biological diversity and ecosystem health to contribute to healthy wildlife populations.

Land Use Allocations

The land use allocations in this RMP are designed to benefit wildlife species—in the aggregate— that use the various seral stages and other habitat areas of the forest.

Management Actions/Direction - All Land Use Allocations

Use the watershed analysis process to address wildlife habitat issues for individual watersheds. The analysis will help to resolve any concerns identified in applying management actions/direction in this section and those in the Special Status and SEIS Special Attention Species and Habitat section. Where appropriate, wildlife habitat enhancement opportunities will be identified through this process.

Coordinate with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife during planning and implementation of wildlife habitat enhancement projects.

Cooperate with federal, tribal, and state wildlife management agencies to identify and eliminate impacts associated with habitat manipulation, poaching, and other activities that threaten the continued existence and distribution of native wildlife inhabiting federal lands.

Management Actions/Direction - Riparian Reserves

Design and implement wildlife habitat restoration and enhancement activities in a manner that contributes to attainment of Aquatic Conservation Strategy objectives.

Design, construct, and operate wildlife interpretive and other user-enhancement facilities in a manner that does not retard or prevent attainment of Aquatic Conservation Strategy objectives. For existing wildlife interpretive and other user-enhancement facilities inside Riparian Reserves, ensure that Aquatic Conservation Strategy objectives are met. Where Aquatic Conservation Strategy objectives cannot be met, relocate or close such facilities.

Cooperate with federal, tribal, and state wildlife management agencies to identify and eliminate wild ungulate impacts that are inconsistent with attainment of Aquatic Conservation Strategy objectives.

Management Actions/Direction - Late-Successional Reserves

Design projects to improve conditions for wildlife if they provide late-successional habitat benefits or if their effect on late-successional associated species is negligible.

If introduction of a non-native species is proposed, complete an assessment of impacts and avoid any introduction that would retard or prevent achievement of Late-Successional Reserve objectives.

Evaluate impacts of non-native species existing within Late-Successional Reserves.

Develop plans and recommendations for eliminating or controlling non-native species that are inconsistent with Late-Successional Reserve objectives. Include an analysis of effects of implementing such programs on other species within Late-Successional Reserves.

Management Actions/Direction - Matrix, including General Forest Management Area and Connectivity/Diversity Blocks

Retain snags within a timber harvest unit at levels sufficient to support species of cavity-nesting birds at 40 percent of potential population levels. Meet the 40 percent minimum throughout the Matrix with per acre requirements met on average areas no larger than 40 acres.

General Forest Management Area

Retain late-successional forest patches in landscape areas where little late-successional forest persists. This management action/direction will be applied in fifth field watersheds (20 to 200 square miles) in which federal forest lands are currently comprised of 15 percent or less late-successional forest. (The assessment of 15 percent will include all federal land allocations in a watershed.) Within such an area, protect all remaining late-successional forest stands. Protection of these stands could be modified in the future when other portions of a watershed have recovered to the point where they could replace the ecological roles of these stands.

Retain 6-8 green conifer trees per acre after regeneration harvest. Retained trees will be distributed in variable patterns (e.g., single trees, clumps and stringers) to contribute to stand diversity.

In addition to the green tree retention management action/direction, retain green trees for snag recruitment in harvest units where there is an identified, near-term (less than 3 decades) snag deficit. These trees do not count toward green-tree retention requirements.

A minimum of 120 linear feet of logs per acre, averaged over the cutting area and reflecting species mix of the unit, will be retained in the cutting area. All logs shall have bark intact, be at least 16 inches in diameter at the large end, and be at least 16 feet in length. Logs shall be distributed throughout the cutting area, and not piled or concentrated in a few areas. Decay class 1 and 2 logs will be credited toward the total. Where this management action/direction cannot be met with existing coarse woody debris, merchantable material will be used to make up the deficit.

Connectivity/Diversity Blocks

Provide Connectivity/Diversity Blocks spaced throughout the BLM land base. Manage the blocks as follows:

-   Maintain 25 to 30 percent of each block in late-successional forest at any point in time. The percentage of habitat will include habitat in other allocations, such as Riparian Reserves. Blocks may be comprised of contiguous or noncontiguous BLM-administered land. The size and arrangement of habitat within a block should provide effective habitat to the extent possible.
-   Retain 12-18 green conifer trees per acre when an area is regeneration harvested. Distribute the retained trees in variable patterns (e.g., single trees, clumps and stringers) to contribute to stand diversity. The management goal for the retained trees and subsequent density management is recovery of old-growth conditions in approximately 100 to 120 years.
-   A minimum of 120 linear feet of logs per acre, averaged over the cutting area and reflecting species mix of the unit, will be retained in the cutting area. All logs shall have bark intact, be at least 16 inches in diameter at the large end, and be at least 16 feet in length. Logs shall be distributed throughout the cutting area, and not piled or concentrated in a few areas. Decay class 1 and 2 logs will be credited toward the total. Where this management action/direction cannot be met with existing coarse woody debris, merchantable material will be used to make up the deficit.

Special Habitats

Using interdisciplinary teams, identify special habitat areas and determine relevant values for protection or management on a case-by-case basis. Of particular importance in these determinations will be the habitat of species that have protection buffers specified in the SEIS ROD.

Use management practices—including fire—to obtain desired vegetation conditions in special habitats.

Raptors and Great Blue Herons

Maintain the integrity of nest sites, centers of activity, or rookeries.

Install nesting platforms, nest boxes, and other structures to enhance habitat as appropriate.

Establish the following buffers:

Species Buffer

Osprey   1 to 5 acres, depending on site characteristics.
Golden Eagle   Protect sufficient acreage around nest site to avoid human disturbance.
Red-tailed Hawk   Up to 1 acre around nest site.
Sharp-shinned Hawk   10-acre management area surrounding nest site.
Cooper's Hawk   15-acre management area surrounding nest site.
Great Blue Heron/Great Egret   250-yard no-disturbance buffer around heron and egret colonies.

Roosevelt Elk

In elk habitat areas, close and rehabilitate roads unneeded for continued resource management or use. Within the ODFW Tioga Big Game Management Area (approximately 190,200 acres), the goal will be to maintain 1.1 miles of road per section per watershed with a maximum density of 2.9 miles per section per watershed when all classes of road are considered. In the remainder of the district, the goal will be to maintain a density of 2.9 miles of road per section per watershed. Roads to be closed or with restricted access would be primarily local roads and secondary or collector roads.

Close the following habitat areas to public motorized vehicle use: Dean Creek Elk Viewing Area, except for the developed parking area and uncontrolled access roads.

Use seasonal restrictions on public use and management activities where needed to minimize disturbance and harassment of herds.

Keep major game trails clear of slash accumulations caused by thinning projects.

Conduct forage seeding in habitat areas with appropriate seed beds and where compatible with other management objectives.

Maintain visual barriers along roads in high use big game areas.

Consider utilization of landings and roads for the creation of temporary (not to exceed 20 years) or permanent foraging areas where forage is lacking.