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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT

Oregon / Washington

Prineville Overview

Prineville District Locator Map

Prineville Office
3050 N.E. 3rd Street Prineville, OR 97754  (541) 416-6700
Email: Prineville

Overview

The Prineville District consists of over 1.65 million acres of public lands. These lands are scattered throughout central Oregon, south from The Dalles to the high desert, west to Sisters, and east to the Grant/Harney County line. The Crooked, Deschutes, White, and John Day Rivers make up over 385 miles of wild and scenic river in the District. Riparian improvement, grazing management, and steelhead and salmon habitat improvement are some of the primary management emphases.

Recreation opportunities abound from rock hounding to bass fishing. The Historic Oregon Trail can be witnessed by remnants of wagon ruts, tree scars, and other evidence in many areas of the District. The District office is located on the east end of the city of Prineville and is staffed with an energetic and knowledgeable staff prepared to help you with your area of interest.

Attractions & Recreation Opportunities

Recreation opportunities abound from rock hounding to bass fishing. The Historic Oregon Trail can be witnessed by remnants of wagon ruts, tree scars, and other evidence in many areas of the District. The District office is located on the east end of the city of Prineville and is staffed with an energetic and knowledgeable staff prepared to help you with your area of interest.

rafters on the Lower Deschutes River

Lower Deschutes River

The Lower Deschutes River is an increasingly popular river for all kinds of recreationists. Thousands of people visit each year to enjoy its incredible fishing, exciting whitewater, and beautiful scenery. The river offers a variety of opportunities for both day and overnight trips. The most popular types of recreation include fishing, hunting, boating, mountain biking, and hiking.

View along the John Day River

John Day River

The John Day River basin drains nearly 8,100 square miles of central and northeast Oregon. It is one of our nationís longest free-flowing river systems. Elevations range from 265 feet at the confluence with the Columbia River to over 9,000 feet at the headwaters in the Strawberry Mountain Range.

Recreation opportunities include hunting, fishing, sightseeing, horseback riding, hiking, snowmobiling, skiing, camping, and whitewater rafting.

Detailed Map

To better visualize the extent of our District and the public lands we manage, look at this detailed map that shows major public lands, major roads and the boundary of both our District and Resource Areas.