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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT NEWS RELEASE
Elko District Office
 
Release Date: 11/26/13
Contacts: Lesli Ellis , 775-753-0386 , lellis@blm.gov
News Release No. ELDO 2014-005

Love it and Leave it on your public lands


ELKO, Nev. – The Bureau of Land Management, Elko District would like to remind the public that it is illegal to remove archaeological artifacts from public lands.

Artifacts are most often thought of as prehistoric (pre-European contact) – items such as arrowheads, grinding stones, and artistically modified stones. But, artifacts are also historic–they are the remains of American history across the landscape. Historic artifacts can range from old gun casings to railroad ties, glass bottles and fragments to mining tools and equipment, horse tack to enamelware bowls, tools and farming gear, and any form of household goods.

Archaeological artifacts on public lands belong to all American citizens – not just the person who finds them on the ground. But even more important, they are an essential tool in the understanding of how we as people have - through time - related to our landscape. Often these small pieces of history give us our only tools to know what a site was used for, how old the site is, who lived there, and many other questions.

By collecting artifacts, you deprive others the pleasure of seeing our history. A collected artifact in a personal home may only allow for 10 to 20 visitors, whereas an artifact left for all to see will be seen by an indefinite amount of people.

The Archaeological Resources Protection Act protects artifacts more than 100 years in age, with few exceptions. So, if you find an artifact, please admire it, take a picture, enjoy the location where you found it, but LEAVE IT THERE! If you aren’t sure if it is too old to pick up legally…leave it there! Please set the right example for all who visit public lands.

An old button found on public lands.An old bottle from a mining camp on public lands.Old mining machinery left on public lands.
These are examples of artifacts to be left on public lands.
 
Remnants of a camper discarded on public lands outside Carlin, Nev.An empty beer can stuffed in sage brush.A liquor bottle left on public lands outside Elko, Nev.
These are examples of trash that can be picked up.



The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land, the most of any Federal agency. This land, known as the National System of Public Lands, is primarily located in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The BLM's mission is to manage and conserve the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations under our mandate of multiple-use and sustained yield. In Fiscal Year 2013, the BLM generated $4.7 billion in receipts from public lands.
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Elko District Office   3900 E. Idaho St.      Elko, NV 89801  

Last updated: 11-27-2013