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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT NEWS RELEASE
Battle Mountain District Office
 
Release Date: 07/17/12
Contacts: Shawna Richardson , 775-635-4181 , slrichar@blm.gov
News Release No. BMDO 2012-029

BLM Hauling Water to Aid Wild Horses in the Fish Creek Herd Management Area


 BLM fills water troughs at McCullough Spring.     There are as many as 35-45 horses using the area as well as pronghorn, elk and deer as confirmed by the game camera, which clocked the temperature at 102 degrees in this photo on June 30.

Battle Mountain, Nev. – Drought conditions have intensified in much of Nevada and natural surface water sources in the Fish Creek Herd Management Area (HMA) south of Eureka, Nev. are being adversely affected and are disappearing. In an effort to ensure the health of wild horses in this HMA, water is being hauled by the Battle Mountain District to two locations where the water has already dried up.

With the cooperation of several livestock grazing permittees, two developed water sources have been repaired and activated to give the horses added sources of water. The wild horses are not in poor body condition at this time; however, that could change in a very short period of time due to extended drought conditions. Some horses are showing signs of drought stress and losing weight, and the BLM is concerned about their health, particularly the foals.

The Fish Creek HMA encompasses Antelope Valley and the Antelope and Fish Creek Mountains. The Appropriate Management Level (AML) is 107 to 180 wild horses. The current population is approximately 256 wild horses. Water was hauled to this HMA in 2000 and 2004 due to severe drought conditions and subsequently an emergency wild horse gather was implemented in order to save them from suffering due to lack of forage and water.

“We are frequently monitoring the condition of the wild horses, forage and water availability,” said Battle Mountain District Manager Doug Furtado. “If drought conditions worsen, water-trapping or other drought response actions such as moving wild horses to other areas within the HMA that have suitable water and forage, could be implemented. A large-scale emergency drought gather would be used as a last resort if conditions significantly deteriorate as the summer progresses.”

For more information call Shawna Richardson, Wild Horse & Burro Specialist, at 775-635-4181 or email at s1richar@blm.gov.

Photo captions: 
BLM fills water troughs at McCullough Spring. There are as many as 35-45 horses using the area as well as pronghorn, elk and deer as confirmed by the game camera, which clocked the temperature at 102 degrees in this photo on June 30. This is the only water for miles. 

Editor’s Note: Pictures are available in larger size upon request.



The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land, the most of any Federal agency. This land, known as the National System of Public Lands, is primarily located in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The BLM's mission is to manage and conserve the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations under our mandate of multiple-use and sustained yield. In Fiscal Year 2013, the BLM generated $4.7 billion in receipts from public lands.
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Battle Mountain District Office   50 Bastian Road,      Battle Mountain, NV 89820  

Last updated: 07-17-2012