U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIORBUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT
 
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Camping

A photo of Illipah Reservoir's campground area.Camping is a popular activity on the Ely District, either in established campgrounds or as dispersed camping. Dispersed camping is allowed anywhere on public lands for up to a 14-day limit. Please follow Leave No Trace camping principles including camping in already established campsites, disposing of waste at least 100 feet away from water sources, minimizing campfire impacts by using existing rings respecting others and wildlife, and cleaning up your camp when you leave. This will ensure a great camping experience in the future. The best campsites are found, not made - use existing campsites where possible will prevent unnecessary impacts our natural resources.  Several developed recreation sites, listed below, are also available throughout the District. The BLM does not offer hook-ups at any sites.

General restrictions:

  • Hunting/shooting is not allowed within developed recreation sites.
  • No wood cutting inside designated recreation sites.
  • Motorized travel is not allowed within Wilderness Areas.

Goshute Creek

Goshute Creek provides a primitive camping experience, and is located near the lower end of Goshute Creek, elevation 6,230 feet. It is located in northern Steptoe Valley at the base of the Cherry Creek Range. Goshute Creek flows past site originating higher up in the Goshute Canyon Wilderness Area. Anglers may catch small trout in this stream. This site is located outside of the wilderness boundary where the lower elevations are thickly forested by pinyon pine and juniper. Bristlecone and limber pine blanket the higher elevations. Aspens and cottonwoods in the moist drainages provide for a pleasant, cool retreat for hikers willing to travel a bit further (or off the beaten path).

Things to note: 3 primitive sites, large trailers not recommended. Other amenities: A single picnic table and two fire grills are provided for day use. No restrooms, no potable water, no trash cans: pack-it-in, pack-it-out. Restrictions: Motorized travel is not permitted within the Wilderness area. Hunting/shooting is not allowed within developed recreation sites.

How to get there: This site is located 45 miles north of Ely off of U.S. 93. Seven miles west on Nevada State Route 489 a gravel road heads north. Travel this road 10.7 miles to a signed road, which will take you the last 1/2 mile into Goshute Canyon.

Meadow Valley

Meadow Valley Campground is located in Lincoln County east of Pioche. The main campground lies in a narrow side canyon called Nicanor Canyon in the Mt. Wilson Range, at 5,800-foot elevation. Fishing, hiking and bird watching are popular in the area. This recreation site borders Spring Valley State Park, which provides additional fishing and hiking opportunities.

Things to note: 6 campsites with picnic tables & fire grills. 3 walk-in primitive sites for tents. Restrooms available but no potable water. Trash cans are provided. Limited access for large RV’s but overflow site across the road for larger vehicles. Restrictions: Hunting/shooting is not allowed within developed recreation sites.

How to get there: Take State Route 322, east out of Pioche, NV. Meadow Valley Recreation Site is located a few miles past the town of Ursine.

Sacramento Pass

The Sacramento Pass Recreation Area has reopened to the public following upgrades that improve visitor access and safety.  The improved facilities more closely comply with Americans with Disabilities Act requirements and are designed to be environmentally friendly, where practical.

Sacramento Pass Recreation Area is centrally located between the Osceola Mining Town and Weaver Creek. The Blackhorse Mining District in the Sacramento Pass area was booming in 1906 with hard rock mining for gold. There are ghost town remains north of the recreation site across the highway.

The Osceola Town site is still an active mining community that has unique mining equipment present. A network of signed two-track roads allows hikers, bicyclists, horseback riders and OHV enthusiasts a chance to explore some beautiful country and see some historic mining ruins. There is approximately three miles of single-track trails that explore the unique rock formations near the campsite. These trails are not open to motorized use.

Nearby, Weaver Creek is located in a beautiful canyon drainage offering wildlife viewing, mountain biking and hiking opportunities. Sacramento Pass Recreation Area also has a small pond for fishing. This pond is stocked with trout from the nearby Spring Creek Fish Hatchery.

The Sacramento Pass Recreation Area was initially constructed in 1993 with federal highway funding obtained through the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, and Efficient Transportation Equity Act – A legacy for Users program.  It was reconstructed through Round 12 of the Southern Nevada Public Land Management Act, or SNPLMA.  The reconstruction cost approximately $375,000.

Things to note: The remodeled site includes 10 new “pull-thru” and/or “back- in” campsites with low maintenance furnishings, interpretive kiosks and displays, toilet buildings and concrete walkways, pond-accessible trails and fully-accessible fishing deck, a hiking and biking trail, and an equestrian trailhead, as well as road improvements. 

The new Pond Campground Loop includes six new campsites and a vault toilet building, interpretive displays and a trailhead area.  Five of the sites provide single family sun-shelters and furnishings, and the larger group campsite includes a group shelter, multiple tables and other furnishings.  One of the single family units is fully-accessible.

The Upper Trailhead/Campground offers four new camp sites, a vault toilet building, interpretive displays and a trailhead area.  The trailhead/campground was especially designed to accommodate equestrian trail users with easy access to a multitude of trails just outside Great Basin National Park boundaries. One of the four campsites is fully accessible. Restrictions: Hunting/shooting is not allowed within developed recreation sites.

How to get there: Sacramento Pass Recreation Area is located along Highway 50 about 40 miles east of Ely or 15 miles west of the Utah border.  Approximately 30 miles from Great Basin National Park.  Look for the sign on the south side of the Hwy.

Cleve Creek 

Cleve Creek Recreation Area is located in Spring Valley near the mouth of a major drainage on the east side of the Schell Creek Range and the High Schells Wilderness Area. Elevation is 6,233 feet. Cleve Creek is a year-round stream that supports lush greenery around the campsites. Rainbow trout as well as brooks and browns can be caught in the stream. Tall tales can be told at the liar’s bench. The road continues up the canyon offering hikers and horseback riders plenty of areas to explore. OHV enthusiasts can find plenty of established roads to enjoy outside the Wilderness boundary. For more information regarding the Wilderness boundary and routes available for motorized use contact the Humboldt/Toiyabe National Forest, Ely Ranger District. 

Things to note: 12 campsites and 1 group site with picnic tables & fire grills. Most sites suitable for trailers 24 ft. maximum. Restrooms available but no potable water. Trash cans are provided. Restrictions: Hunting/shooting is not allowed within developed recreation sites. Motorized travel is not allowed within Wilderness Areas. 
How to get there: Located 43 miles from Ely. Go 28.3 miles southeast of Ely on US 6/50, head north on NV 893 (North Spring Valley Road), then go 2.5 miles west on signed a graded road.  

Illipah Reservoir

Illipah Reservoir campground is located at the base of the White Pine Range and includes reservoir popular for fishing. Elevation is 6,840 feet. Illipah is a popular spot to catch rainbow trout and brown trout throughout the year. Ice fishing is a popular activity during the winter. Exploring the nearby ghost town of Hamilton and the extensive road network are popular summer activities in the area. For more information about Hamilton and scenic driving in this area please contact the Humboldt/Toiyabe National Forest, Ely Ranger District. 

Things to note: 14 campsites suitable for large trailers and RVs. Grills, picnic tables, and shade structures are available at most of the sites. Restrooms are available, but no potable water. Trash cans are provided. Restrictions: Hunting/shooting is not allowed within developed recreation sites.

How to get there: Illipah Reservoir is 37 miles west of Ely on Highway 50, turn at the sign for Illipah Reservoir and continue 1 mile to a road junction, turn left and continue 1.3 miles to the campground.  

Ward Mountain

Ward Mountain Recreation Area is jointly administered by the BLM and the US Forest Service. A developed campground is located at the US Forest Service recreation site. Trails are available for hikers, bikers, cross-country skiers, and horses. Warming/rest shelters are available along several of the trails. Restrooms are available at the trailheads. For more information you can contact the Humboldt/Toiyabe National Forest, Ely Ranger District or at Recreation.gov. 
Things to note: Motorized travel is not permitted within the USFS Recreation area. Hunting/shooting is not allowed within developed recreation sites. Please respect others by not snowshoeing or hiking on existing cross-country ski tracks, whenever possible. 
How to get there: Ward Mountain Recreation Area is located approximately 6 miles south of Ely off Highway 6. When you reach the summit on US 6 take the spur road to the west to reach the North Trailhead. Ward Mountain Campground, located on US 6, is marked with a sign along the highway 

Patterson Pass

Patterson Pass Trailhead and campground sits at the base of Patterson Pass on the Schell Creek Range. It is along the Silver State Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trail system. Although the Silver State Trail is a designated OHV trail, it is used for many different activities. Some of these include hunting, access routes for ranching, sightseeing, hiking, and firewood gathering. Elevation is 6,240 feet.

Things to note: 10 campsites suitable for large trailers and RVs. Grills, picnic tables, and shade structures are available at most of the sites. Restrooms are available, but no potable water. Trash cans are provided. Restrictions: Hunting/shooting is not allowed within developed recreation sites. Motorized travel is not allowed within Wilderness Areas. 

How to get there: The Patterson Trailhead is located approximately 47 miles northwest of Pioche, Nevada. Traveling north from Pioche on Highway 93, turn left (west) at the Silver State OHV Trail sign and proceed west on the maintained dirt road for 1.1 miles to the campground.  

Pahroc Wash

Pahroc Wash Trailhead sits on the north end of the Hiko Range near Big Rocks Wilderness. It is along the Silver State OHV Trail system. Although the Silver State Trail is a designated OHV trail, it is used for many different activities. Some of these include hunting, exploring, scenic viewing and hiking. Elevation is 4600 feet.

Things to note: 1 campsite suitable for small trailers. Grill, picnic table, and shade structure are available. Restrooms available, but no potable water. Trash cans are provided. Restrictions: Hunting/shooting is not allowed within developed recreation sites. Motorized travel is not allowed within Wilderness Areas. 
How to get there: The Pahroc Wash Trailhead is located approximately 60 miles northwest of Caliente, Nevada and 15 miles north of the town of Hiko, Nevada. Head north on State Route 318 from Hiko, turn east at the Silver State OHV trail sign. Proceed on the gravel road for about a mile to the campground. 

Stampede

Stampede Trailhead is on the east side of the Bristol Range. It is along the Silver State OHV Trail system. Although the Silver State Trail is a designated OHV trail, it is used for many different activities. Some of these include hunting, exploring, scenic viewing and hiking. Elevation is 6060 feet.

Things to note: 4 campsites with shade shelters, fire rings and grills. Sites are suitable for large trailers and RVs. Restrooms are available but no potable water. Trash cans are provided.
Restrictions: Hunting/shooting is not allowed within developed recreation sites.
 
How to get there: The Stampede Trailhead is approximately 8 miles northwest of Pioche, Nevada. To reach this trailhead, travel north on US Highway 93, and turn left at the Silver
State OHV Trail Sign. Proceed west on the maintained dirt road for 2 miles. The
trailhead is in a large open area on the south end of the gravel pit complex. 

Chief Mountain West

Chief Mountain West Trailhead is west of Caliente and lies on the west side of the Burnt Springs Range. It is along the Silver State OHV Trail system and there is a designated OHV practice loop just outside of the campground perimeter fence. Elevation is 4920.

Things to note: 4 campsites (3 singles and 1 group) suitable for large trailers and RVs. Grills, picnic tables, and shade structures are available at most of the sites. Restrooms are available but no potable water. Trash cans are provided. Restrictions: Hunting/shooting is not allowed within developed recreation sites.
 
How to get there: The Chief Mountain West Trailhead is located approximately 21 miles west of Caliente, Nevada. Traveling on US Highway 93 west from Caliente, turn right at the Silver State OHV Trail sign and proceed north on the dirt power line road for 3.5 miles. Turn east on the Silver State Trail and travel another 0.5 mile to the trailhead. This trailhead has a riding practice area. 

Chief Mountain South

Chief Mountain South Trailhead is directly west of the town Caliente and lies just below Oak Springs Summit. It is the gateway to the south edge of the Silver State OHV Trail system. There is a designated OHV riding practice area here and excellent access to Burnt Springs Range. Elevation is 6240 feet.

Things to note: 6 campsites suitable for large trailers and RVs. Grills, picnic tables, and shade structures are available at most of the sites. Restrooms are available, but no potable water. Trash cans are provided. Restrictions: Hunting/shooting is not allowed within developed recreation sites.

How to get there: The Chief Mountain South Trailhead is located approximately 9 miles west of Caliente, Nevada. Traveling west on US Highway 93, turn off at the Silver State OHV Trail sign. Proceed north on the maintained dirt road for 0.5 mile to the trailhead. There is a riding practice area here.


 
Last updated: 09-30-2014