U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIORBUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT
 
Elko Field Office
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CONTACT: Mike Brown, 775-753-0386
email: mbrown@nv.blm.gov
ELKO FIELD OFFICE NO. 2007-46


BOY SCOUTS, 4-WHEEL CLUB HELP FIRE RECOVERY

Portions of Sherman Creek 10 miles east of Elko got a helping hand with new trees courtesy of an Elko Boy Scout Eagle Project and volunteers from Bangin’ Bones.

Elko Boy Scout Shawn Howe, troop members, Bangin’ Bones 4-wheeler club members, and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) volunteers planted approximately 140 aspen and narrow leaf cottonwood trees on Sherman Creek on April 7, 2007.

“Combined effects of fires, floods and livestock overgrazing in the past severely damaged Sherman Creek,” said BLM Elko Fisheries Biologist Carol Evans. “Much of the native aspen/cottonwood riparian corridor along the creek was lost. Because aspen do not effectively reproduce by seed in the Great Basin, new stock must be planted for the trees to become reestablished.”

The Scouts started the project by digging up 50 aspen tree sprouts from U.S. Forest Service land near Wells, Nev. They cared for the sprouts for two weeks until they were transplanted along Sherman Creek. In addition, 75 nursery-grown aspen seedlings and 12 narrow leaf cottonwood trees were planted. The trees were carried to the site in backpacks and on horseback.

“This was a great project,” Evans added. “Sherman Creek is important habitat for Lahontan Cutthroat Trout. Trees are critical to health of the stream and will help prevent any further gullying caused by fire and flooding. Recent grazing management changes and reseeding of areas burned during the 2005 Sherman Fire will also help recover the drainage. The Boy Scouts and Bangin’ Bones club members kindly accomplished this much needed project.”


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Last updated: 04-07-2008