U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIORBUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT
 
Wells Field Office
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Three HMA Water/Bait Trap Environmental Assessment

Interested Party Letter (5/13/13)

Decision Record

Finding of No Significant Impact

Environmental Assessment

Appendicies

  1. Standard Operating Procedures
  2. 2012 Inventory Waypoint and Wild Horse Numbers Central Portion of the Antelope Valley HMA
  3. Migratory Birds by Ecotype
  4. Wildlife Stipulations
  5. Comments and Responses

Interested Party Letter (9/4/12)

Environmental Assessment

Appendicies:

  1. Standard Operating Procedures
  2. Migratory Birds by Ecotype
  3. Wildlife Stipulations

Project Area Map

Public Scoping Letter (6/21/12)

Photos from 2013

WIld Horses gather around a trough at Cherry SpringsWild horses gather around a trough at Cherry Springs. The springs natural flow is approximately 14 gallons per hour. The Elko District BLM has been hauling water to supplement the wild horse population since May. To date, approximately 15,000 gallons have been delivered. Wild horses become agressive with each other when competing for the limited water flow at the springs. Photo taken June 11, 2013.A view of a pond at Cherry Spring in the Maverick-Medicine Herd Management AreaBLM Wild Horse & Burro Specialist, Bruce Thompson, provides an overview of water trap operations at Cherry Spring in the Maverick-Medicine HMA July 27, 2013. The overflow pond is in the foreground with six troughs in the background all together hold 3,000 gallons of water.
Wild Horses as seen from a distance converging on a water trough at Cherry Spring within the Maverick Medicine Herd Management AreaWild horses gather around a trough at Cherry Springs. The springs natural flow is approximately 14 gallons per hour. The Elko District BLM has been hauling water to supplement the wild horse population since May. To date, approximately 15,000 gallons have been delivered to the an estimated 80 (Observed on July 2, 2013) wild horses in this area. This photo was taken from Ruby Wash road on June 10, 2013. Public gather around Cherry Spring during a tour of the site July 27, 2013 The Elko District BLM hosted a public tour of Cherry Spring in the Maverick-Medicine HMA to discuss range conditions and water trap operations. The natural flow is about 10-15 gallons an hour which can sustain approximately 20-24 wild horses. Water hauling efforts to this spring began in late May and approximately 80 wild horses have been observed frequenting here.
Water tricling from a pipe at Cherry Springs within the Maverick Medicine Herd Management AreaThe flow of water at Cherry Springs within the Maverick Medicine Herd Management Area. This flow is approximately 14 gallons an hour which can accomodate 20 wild horses. This spring has been observed to have more than 80 wild horses frequenting it. This photo was taken June 28, 2013. Bruce Thompson talks about the degradation of desirable vegetation during a public tour of the Maverick-Medicine HMA July 27, 2013 BLM Wild Horse & Burro Specialist, Bruce Thompson, talks about vegetation in the area of Ruby Wash in the Maverick-Medicine HMA during BLM's public tour of a future water trap wild horse gather in the HMA. Thompson points to the remnants of winter fat that has been grazed down while Kristine Dedolph (BLM Range Technician), Elyse Gardner and Laura Leigh look on.
Three wild horses with their heads in a trough while four wild horses look on.Wild horses gather around a trough at Cherry Springs within the Maverick Medicine Herd Management Area. The springs natural flow is approximately 14 gallons per hour. The Elko District BLM has been hauling water to supplement the wild horse population since May. To date, approximately 15,000 gallons have been delivered to the an estimated 80 (Observed on July 2, 2013) wild horses in this area. Photo taken July 2, 2013. Cliff Gardner and Elyse Gardner pull out a metal fence post at Cherry SpringCliff Gardner works on removing an old metal fence post from Cherry Spring while Elyse Gardner (no relation) watches. The spring provides enough water to support 20-24 wild horses; however there are approximately 60-80 wild horses currently utilizing it. The BLM hosted a public tour of the area July 27, 2013 in preparation for an upcoming wild horse water trap gather.
Two sets of wild horse mares and foals stand behind hard plastic troughsWild horses mares and foals at Cherry Springs within the Maverick Medicine Herd Management Area. A water trap gather is planned for this area Aug. 1 to remove approximately 60 wild horses leaving an appropriate number that can be sustained by the naturally flowing springs. The Elko District BLM has been delivering water to this area since May 2013 and has delivered almost 15,000 gallons of water to date. Photo taken July 2, 2013.A group of finches takes a sip of water at the pond in Cherry SpringWild horses are not the only beneficiaries to the BLM's water hauling efforts. This group of finches takes advantage of the wild horses not being present to get a quick sip of water.


 
Last updated: 08-15-2013