Wildlife Conservation

BLM New Mexico manages wildlife habitat on over 13 million acres of public land. These lands are incredibly rich and diverse, providing essential habitat for our states fish, wildlife, and special status species of plants and animals. Explore some of the tools we use to balance our multiple land use mandate while also protecting and restoring important wildlife habitat.


Sand Dune Lizard

 

Species of Concern
Species that are declining or appear to be in need of conservation.

   
Lesser Prairie Chicken 

Candidate Conservation Agreements
Candidate Conservation Agreements are formal agreements that address the conservation needs of animals before they become listed as endangered or threatened species. The participants voluntarily commit to implementing specific actions that will remove or reduce the threats to these species, thereby contributing to stabilizing or restoring the species. BLM is working closely with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to encourage participation in Candidate Conservation Agreements and Candidate Conservation Agreements with Assurances for the Lesser Prairie Chicken and the Sand Dune Lizard.

   
Habitat Restoration 

Habitat Restoration Efforts
Impacts from population growth, transportation networks, oil and gas development and livestock grazing have taken their toll on New Mexico’s natural landscape.  Learn what’s being done to bring back millions of acres of the state’s native grasslands, woodlands and riparian areas to their pre-1900 ecological states.

Restore New Mexico Initiative

 

Photo of Little Brown Bat with White-Nose Syndrome

 

 

White-nose Syndrome is a disease that has killed over one million hibernating bats in the East and Southeast in the past four years.  Learn what is being done in New Mexico to reduce it's threat.