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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT NEWS RELEASE
Havre Field Office
 
Release Date: 08/21/13
Contacts: Jonathan Moor, 406-538-1943    

BLM Employee named to the Montana Weed Management Advisory Council


Kenny Keever was recently selected to join the Noxious Weed Management Advisory Council as the representative for biological control and research perspectives.

 Keever, the invasive plant specialist for the Bureau of Land Management’s Havre Field Office and Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument, takes the place of Jim Story on the Noxious Weed Management Advisory Council.

 “Jim is a living legend in the world of biological control of noxious weeds,” said Keever.

 Biological control of noxious weeds involves identifying insects and plant pathogens from a plant’s native range, ensuring they will only attack the target plant species, and finding ways to establish them in high numbers in problematic areas where the size of infestation or environmental conditions make it impossible or cost prohibitive to address.  

“Story spent his career with Montana State University researching insects that attack one of Montana’s most abundant and persistent noxious weeds, spotted knapweed,” Keever elaborated. “The fruits of his lifelong work are now being realized in the huge knapweed population crashes being attributed to the agents he helped introduce to western Montana.”

 “It’s truly an honor to be a part of this council,” Keever added.

 Keever has served as the chair of the Montana Weed Control Associations Integrated Weed Management Committee and currently serves as the interim chair of the Montana Biological Weed Control Working Group. 

 Keever’s history with biological control of noxious weeds spans over two decades and began when he was a high school student. In the early 1990’s the BLM partnered with his high school vo-ag program to collect and send out leafy spurge red headed stem borers and flea beetles. 

 According Keever, the introduction and expansion of invasive plants across the western states is one of the most challenging issues land managers face. “Montana has led the charge against these alien invaders for decades, in part thanks to the Montana Noxious Weed Trust Fund,” he explained.    

 As overseer of the Montana Noxious Weed Trust Fund, the Noxious Weed Management Advisory Council is tasked with reviewing applications, hearing applicant testimony, and providing recommendations to the Director of the Montana Department of Agriculture for final funding approval.

 The Montana Noxious Weed Trust Fund grant program was established by the 1985 Montana Legislature to provide funding for the development and implementation of weed management programs. It also provides for research and development of innovative weed management techniques including biological control, and supports research and education projects.

 The grant program is designed to assist counties, local communities, researchers, and educators in their efforts to solve a variety of noxious weed problems in Montana. 

 The program provides assistance in the form of a 50 percent cost-share, with landowner matching funds, for herbicides and commercial application to participating landowners in a local cooperative weed management area.  

 Other types of projects involve noxious weed education and research, including non-chemical research and demonstration projects.

 Keever stated, “I look forward to seeing the innovative projects and ideas folks from Montana are using in their weed programs and maybe even apply some of that to our public lands in North Central Montana.”

For the latest BLM news and updates visit us on the web at www.blm.gov/mt, on Facebook at www.facebook.com/BLMMontana, or follow us on Twitter @BLM_MTDKs.
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Photo of: Kenny Keever, the Invasive Plant Specialist for the Bureau of Land Management’s Havre Field Office and Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument, talks about the Standardized Impact Monitoring Protocol for biological control agents during a field tour. Keever was recently selected to join the Noxious Weed Management Advisory Council as the representative for biological control and research perspectives.Kenny Keever, the Invasive Plant Specialist for the Bureau of Land Management’s Havre Field Office and Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument, talks about the Standardized Impact Monitoring Protocol for biological control agents during a field tour. Keever was recently selected to join the Noxious Weed Management Advisory Council as the representative for biological control and research perspectives.
Photo of: Kenny Keever, the invasive plant specialist for the Bureau of Land Management’s Havre Field Office and Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument, replaced Jim Story on the Noxious Weed Management Advisory Council. Story pioneered the technique of controlling spotted knapweed through the targeted releases of the knapweed root boring weevil (Cyphocleonus achates), being used by Stephen Smith, a rangeland management specialist at the Lewistown Field Office, at Limekiln Canyon.Kenny Keever, the invasive plant specialist for the Bureau of Land Management’s Havre Field Office and Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument, replaced Jim Story on the Noxious Weed Management Advisory Council. Story pioneered the technique of controlling spotted knapweed through the targeted releases of the knapweed root boring weevil (Cyphocleonus achates), being used by Stephen Smith, a rangeland management specialist at the Lewistown Field Office, at Limekiln Canyon.
Photo of: These weevils are highly effective in reducing spotted knapweed populations in areas where it is difficult to use herbicides.  This was a proactive release to control knapweed populations on BLM lands.These weevils are highly effective in reducing spotted knapweed populations in areas where it is difficult to use herbicides.  This was a proactive release to control knapweed populations on BLM lands.



The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land, the most of any Federal agency. This land, known as the National System of Public Lands, is primarily located in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The BLM's mission is to manage and conserve the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations under our mandate of multiple-use and sustained yield. In Fiscal Year 2013, the BLM generated $4.7 billion in receipts from public lands.
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Havre Field Office   3990 Highway 2 West      Havre, MT 59501   

Last updated: 08-21-2013