U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIORBUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT
Montana/Dakotas
 
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Special Places in the Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument

 

Missouri Breaks Back County Byway
The Missouri Breaks Back Country Byway was designated in 1993. The Byway has over 75 miles of gravel and unimproved roads that traverse portions of the Missouri River Breaks and lead the to scenic overlooks of the UMNSWR.  Click here for more information. 


Cow Creek WSA
This WSA covers 34,050 acres on the north side of the Missouri River. Of this total, 21,590 acres were recommended as suitable for wilderness designation. The size of the area, opportunities for solitude and primitive recreation, and the attractiveness of the setting combine to provide excellent wilderness quality. A diversity of recreational opportunities makes this area excellent for primitive recreational use, and a four-mile long sheer wall of sandstone is an outstanding scenic feature. 
Woodhawk WSA
This WSA covers 4,800 acres on the north side of the Missouri River. More than 90 percent of the WSA is within the UMNWSR corridor, located in a very rugged portion of the Missouri Breaks. None of this WSA was recommended for wilderness designation because of the combination of small size and configuration of the WSA which are affected by offsite sights and sounds and have a high potential for natural gas development. This WSA does contain isolated areas that offer outstanding opportunities for solitude, but does not contain outstanding primitive recreation opportunities. 
Stafford WSA
The WSA covers 10,200 acres on the north side of the Missouri River. Approximately 5,060 acres along the southern boundary of the WSA lay within a wild segment of the UMNWSR corridor. None of this WSA was recommended for wilderness designation due to a variety of resource conflicts and manageability concerns including a high potential for natural gas development. The WSA contains few opportunities for outstanding solitude and primitive recreation. However, the area is very scenic and rugged, combining steep slopes with narrow ridges. 
Ervin Ridge WSA
The WSA is on the south side of the Missouri River and contains 5,150 acres. Just over 3,900 acres are within the UMNWSR corridor. None of this WSA was recommended as suitable for wilderness designation due to the high potential for natural gas development and the potential for wilderness management conflicts. The small size of this area, along with terrain that opens to major off-site influences just beyond its boundaries, limits the opportunities for outstanding solitude to isolated areas in the deeper drainages. The area also lacks outstanding opportunities for primitive recreation, the scenic quality is lacking for designation. 
Dog Creek WSA
This 8,100-acre WSA is on the south side of the Missouri River. About 3,500 acres of the WSA are within the UMNWSR corridor. None of the WSA was recommended as suitable for wilderness designation due to a combination of the unit's small size, the a cherry-stemmed road running through the WSA, and several resource conflicts. It has a high potential for natural gas reserves. The WSA does not contain outstanding primitive and unconfined recreational opportunities, but does have colorful broken topography. It also contains several prehistoric occupation sites. During the steamboat era, woodhawkers (wood cutters) cut timber to fuel steamboats plying the Missouri River. Chief Joseph's Nez Perce Indians probably traversed the area in their attempt to escape to Canada in 1877. 
Antelope Creek WSA
The WSA covers about 12,350 acres on the north side of the Missouri River. Of this total, 9,600 acres were recommended for wilderness. This WSA offers outstanding opportunities for solitude and provides a diversity of primitive recreational opportunities such as hiking, photography, hunting, and rock climbing. The area is rich in historical significance, including Kid Curry's outlaw hideaway. 
Cow Creek ACEC
The 19,746-acre Cow Creek ACEC contains a segment of the Nez Perce National Historic Trail, the Cow Island Trail and the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. It also includes portions of the Cow Creek Wilderness Study Area. 
 Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge
The western end of the Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge borders the last 10 miles of the scenic segment of the Upper Missouri National Wild and Scenic River. It includes native prairies, forested coulees, river bottoms and badlands that were often portrayed in cowboy artist Charles M. Russell's paintings. The refuge is managed primarily for wildlife habitat and includes large populations of elk, sharptail grouse,and many other wildlife species. The refuge also preserves cultural, archeological and paleontological resources and provides wildlands recreation opportunities.
Nez Perce National Historic Trail
The western end of the Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge borders the last 10 miles of the scenic segment of the Upper Missouri National Wild and Scenic River. It includes native prairies, forested coulees, river bottoms and badlands that were often portrayed in cowboy artist Charles M. Russell's paintings. The refuge is managed primarily for wildlife habitat and includes large populations of elk, sharptail grouse,and many other wildlife species. The refuge also preserves cultural, archeological and paleontological resources and provides wildlands recreation opportunities.  Click here for more information.
James Kipp Recreation Management Area
The Kipp Recreation Management Area is a campground at the terminus of the 149-mile UMNWSR. The 210-acre site is totally surrounded by lands managed by the U.S.Fish and Wildlife Service. The existing recreation area is located on Corps of Engineers land. The BLM has a long-term lease to manage the recreation area, which includes a boat ramp and fish cleaning station,campsites for tents and recreational vehicles, potable water, sewage dump station, and vault toilets.  Click here for more information. 

 

 

 

 


 
Last updated: 08-23-2013