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Homesteading in Idaho

Whiskey Springs Homestead in Thousand Springs Valley

Shaping America's History | Whiskey Springs: Learn about an early Idaho homestead | Earthquake Story at Whiskey Springs | May 2012 Idaho Archaeology and Historic Preservation MonthPresentation: Westward expansion of the American Frontier

Sharron Larter-Akers was raised on the Whiskey Springs homestead built by her grandfather ClaudiusIdaho Homesteading 
Total:
60,221 homesteads
Total acres in State: 52,960,640
Total acres homesteaded in State: 9,733,455
Total percentage of Idaho homesteaded: 18% 

Commemorating the Homestead Act's 150th Anniversary

The cry was FREE LAND! The Homestead Act of 1862 was one of the most significant and enduring events in the westward expansion of the United States. By granting free land it allowed nearly any man or woman a chance to live the American dream.

2012 marks the 150th anniversary of one of America's most influential pieces of legislation, the Homestead Act of 1862.

Homestead Act 150th AnniversaryThe 1862 Homestead Act was passed by President Abraham Lincoln. The Act was the first homestead act under which settlers could obtain up to 160 acres without cost other than filing fee. The first filings were allowed starting on January 1, 1863. The final homestead patent awarded under the Act was to Kenneth W. Deardorff in Alaska, who filed his application for the land on May 16, 1974, and patented on May 5, 1988.

 


  

Little Jack’s Creek Wilderness Area: 
Two historic homesteads are present in the newly acquired lands in the Wilderness Area. As yet, undocumented in the Architectural and Archaeological Survey of Idaho records, the U.S. Government Land Office original survey plats show that John H. Campton and Frank N. Purjue settled in the area sometime before 1915. The family records of John H. Campton show he had settled on the property by 1908. The remains of their enterprise can be seen as a log cabin, stone ruins, ditches, foundations, fences, rock carvings, historic artifacts such as cans, glass, wire and wood items.

JH Compton Homestead ca. 1915Frank N. Purjue Homestead ca. 1915

 Challis, Idaho Area - Boone Cabin
    Boone Cabin near Challis, Idaho  Boone Cabin near Challis, Idaho