Idaho’s Salamanders

Salamanders are sticky because they need water to survive! Without water, salamanders dry up. Why is this? Because of their skin and the way they breathe. 

How do salamanders differ from lizards? They look similar, but there are a few differences. Salamanders have very moist, naked skin, clawless toes, and no external ear openings. Lizards have dry, scaly skin, clawed toes, and you can see little external ear openings if you can get close enough. Lizards, because they are used to living on land instead of water, can run much faster on land than salamanders can.    

Baby salamanders breathe through gills. Some salamanders retain these gills as adults. But most will go through metamorphosis (when their bodies change) where their gills are replaced by lungs (an exception to this is the lung-less salamander). Salamanders can breathe through their skin too, which is why they always need to be near water, otherwise their skin will dry up.

To learn more about some of Idaho's salamanders, click the salamander names on the right. 


Wildlife 

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Herbivore Mammals

Jackrabbit 
Pygmy rabbit 
Desert cottontail 
Beaver 
Eastern gray squirrel 
Red squirrel 
Chipmunk 
Deer mouse
Kangaroo rat 
Meadow vole 
Mule deer 
Elk 
Bighorn sheep 
American pronghorn 
Moose  


Carnivore Mammals

Bobcat 
American badger 
River otter 
Red fox 
Long-tailed weasel 
Coyote 
Grizzly bear 
Mountain lion   


Amphibians

 Salamanders 

  Long-toed salamander 
  Idaho giant salamander  
  Coeur d'Alene salamander

 Frogs and Toads  

  American bullfrog 
  Columbia spotted frog 
  Western toad 
  Northern leopard frog 
  Pacific tree frog 
  Great Basin spadefoot 

Reptiles 

Snakes

Painted turtle 
Northern alligator lizard 
Mohave black-collared lizard 
Short-horned lizard 
Desert horned lizard 
Sagebrush lizard 
Western fence lizard 
Western skink 
Side-blotched lizard 
Longnosed leopard lizard 
Western whiptail 

 

Bats 

Western pipistrelle 
Western small-footed myotis 
Little brown bat 
Yuma myotis 
Townsend's big-eared bat 
Hoary bat 
Silver-haired bat 
Fringed myotis 
Pallid bat

Sensitive Species (not a complete list) 

Greater sage-grouse 
Pygmy rabbit 
No. Idaho ground squirrel 
So. Idaho ground squirrel
Canada lynx 
Grizzly bear 
Selkirk Mtns. woodland caribou 
Kootenai White River sturgeon 
Bull trout 
Sockeye salmon 
Chinook salmon 
Steelhead trout 
Yellow-billed cuckoo


Birds

     Waterfowl 
     Raptors
     Songbirds

Fish