Lowry Pueblo in Canyons of the Ancients Natl Monument
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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
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13th century Ancestral Pueblo masonry, Canyons of the Ancients Natl Monument 13th century Ancestral Pueblo masonry, Canyons of the Ancients Natl Monument 13th century Ancestral Pueblo masonry, Canyons of the Ancients Natl Monument 13th century Ancestral Pueblo masonry, Canyons of the Ancients Natl Monument 13th century Ancestral Pueblo masonry, Canyons of the Ancients Natl Monument
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National Monuments>Canyons of the Ancients>Archaeological Sites>Sand Canyon Sites>Castle Rock Pueblo
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Castle Rock Pueblo

 

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Castle Rock Pueblo

Saddlehorn Pueblo

Double Cliff House

Corncob House

Sunny Alcove

Tucked Away Two Story House

Wall Curves with Bedrock House

House with Standing Curved Wall

Sand Canyon Pueblo

Sand Canyon Geology

CLICK ON ONE OF THE SAND CANYON SITES (ABOVE) FOR MORE INFORMATION



Castle Rock Pueblo. AD 1250 (detail) by Paul Ermigiotti
CASTLE ROCK PUEBLO, ca. AD 1250
west side (reconstruction by Paul Ermigiotti)

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Castle Rock Pueblo in 1874, east side (below)
Castle Rock ("Battle Rock") in 1874 by William Henry Jackson

 

 Castle Rock Pueblo in 1908, east side (below)Castle Rock 1908 by Jesse Nusbaum

 

Castle Rock Pueblo in 2012, east side (below)
Castle Rock Pueblo, east side, 2012. BLM photo


 Castle Rock Pueblo (5MT1825) was founded around AD 1250, andwas  occupied for about 30 years. It is contemporary with small cliff dwellings in lower Sand Canyon and with the cliff dwellings at Mesa Verde. Unlike those communities, which were built inside of rock alcoves, these people built their village on and around the base of a steep butte.

The village had at least 16 kivas, 40 above-ground rooms, nine possible towers, and a large D-shaped enclosure. Most kivas in this region are circular, but one found at Castle Rock was rectangular, like the modern kivas of the Hopi people.

Castle Rock's inhabitants moved away after AD 1280. The remains of the pueblo were likely a landmark for Ute and Navajo hunters and shepherds, occasional Puebloan descendants on pilgrimage, Anglo traders and settlers, and others who used this ancient and well-traveled east-west route.

Pioneer photographer William Henry Jackson  took the first photographs of Castle Rock in 1874, while on an expedition for the United States Geological Survey .

The site has changed during the last 150 years. The photo sequence at left --from 1874, 1908, and 2012-- shows the near-complete disappearance of two walls on the east side and base of the rock. The middle photo includes a structure (right foreground) of which a small fragment remains intact today. 

In some cases, archaeological structures are not stabilized, and they will eventually return to the earth. This policy was developed in consultation with Native American tribal stakeholders with a connection to the area and to the Ancestral Puebloan people. 

Crow Canyon Archaeological Center archaeologists conducted intensive excavations at certain locations within the Castle Rock site in 1993-94.

See Crow Canyon's Castle Rock report


pictograph hand stripe