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Watching Wildlife in Northwest Colorado

Wildlife Viewing Tips and EthicsElk photo

  • Early morning and late evening are the best times to observe wildlife.
  • Avoid approaching animals with young and do not disturb nesting birds.
  • Be quiet and avoid startling animals. Stay behind cover whenever possible.
  • Be patient and wait for animals to come into view.


Cedar Mountain

Look for three different habitats found in northwestern Colorado as you wander Cedar Mountain-- Sagebrush, juniper woodlands, and mountain shrub. Each of these habitats offers something to the wildlife that use Cedar Mountain and other areas of northwestern Colorado.

  • The Big Sage - The sage brush habitat covers vast areas of the West. A wide variety of wildlife utilize this habitat, depending on the season. It provides perches, nesting sites and hiding places for birds and a place to get out of the summer heat for cottontails and jackrabbits.
  • Juniper Woodland - Rocky Mountain junipers are also called western red cedars, the namesake of Cedar Mountain. Wildlife may live in the juniper woodland habitat year-round or visit it seasonally to take advantage of nesting sites, shelter from harsh weather, or food variety (seeds, fruits, mice, chipmunks, deer).
  • Mountain Shrub communities are a transition between grasslands and forests, providing wildlife with a diverse supply of food, nesting places, and cover. There is a wide variety of wildlife that utilize this habitat, depending on the season. Springtime sees summer and resident species prepare to nest, hibernating rodents and reptiles emerge and mule deer feed on new leaf growth before moving up to summer range. Seeds and fruits mature in the fall and feed wildlife that is migrating or preparing to hibernate. Many species find refuge from high elevation winter snow in the mountain shrub community.

Other Cedar Mountain Information


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