Twin Peaks Adopted Horses and Burros


The Twin Peaks HMA is very popular with adopters.  These horses are known to have excellent temperaments and generally have some size to them.*  Many of the horses exceed 15 hh.  People say they see a thoroughbred influence on these animals.  In addition to the bays, blacks, sorrels, and chestnuts found in most herds, many of the horses gathered in 2010 were appaloosas.  Twin Peaks burros tend to be stouter burros than their hot desert counterparts.  The Twin Peak burro herds tend to have more brown animals than gray, or other burro colors.

If you would like to have your animal showcased on our pages, please send a photo and your story to adumas@blm.gov.  Please include the animal's name, HMA, year adopted, age, and what you do with him/her.

*As with any of the HMAs, these characterizations are general and no guarantee of how your adopted animal will behave.  Each animal is a unique individual with his/her own personality.


 

Sandy D. and Jewel out for an afternoon splash.  Sandy adopted Jewel in 2003.  Jewel is 11 years old and is currently does combined training.  Jewel enjoys her job so much that at her first horse trial, she acted like an "old pro."  Even though she had been jumping for only two weeks and had never seen a water obstacle, she placed first in her division with a junior rider aboard.  We are so proud of Jewel's progress!

 
 

Sue W. adopted Walley in 2002 as a long yearling. Walley is an appaloosa and is Sue's "go-to guy."  Sue and Walley are active participants in the World Equitation Association events.  Sue uses Walley to gentle other wild horses and when working with her clients' horses.  Walley has been an ambassador for several BLM events.  Walley lives in southern California with several other BLM horses that Sue adopted.

 
 

Stacey C. adopted Mocha as a yearling from the Litchfield Corrals in 2004 when she accompanied a friend who was adopting a horse.  Stacey and Mocha play in parades and shows.  Mocha lives with two other BLM burro friends and several horses in the Reno area.

 
 

Doris L. and her Twin Peaks mare, Peaky, who is in her early 20's now.  Doris and Peaky did lots of trail riding and camping since she adopted her in 1991. Peaky lives in the California deserts with several adopted horses and burros.

 
Sweet BLM Gold, or Sweetie as she is nicknamed, is owned by Sue W. and ridden by Judy H. was adopted as an endurance horse.   Sue's late father, Bob, dreamed of competing in the Tevis and adopted Sweetie in 2001 at the Litchfield Corrals.  In 2012, Sweetie completed the Tevis Cup.  Sweetie has acted as a BLM ambassador at several events near her home in the Sacramento foothills.  Congratulations to Sue and Judy for doing such a great job with this big, beautiful mare! 
Kristin M. adopted Bentley when she went to the corrals in search of a two or three-year old filly. She took one look at this horse and changed her mind.  She came home with a weanling gelding!  Kristin is starting Bentley under saddle for pleasure riding.  Bentley lives in the Sacramento area with several other domestic horses. 
Andy was assigned to Gracie as part of the 2008 Western States Mustang Challenge.  He was lucky enough to take home the three year old mare he trained at the end of the event!  Gracie and Andy developed that special bond that happens with some mustangs and their people.  Gracie is an all-around horse.  She takes Andy on trail rides, swimming in the river, playing in gymkhana events, carry a flag, and enter the show ring in a calm manner.  Gracie does not know how to say "I cannot" and will do anything for her person, Andy. 
Kaily's family purchased Johnny Cash as a 5 year old in August 2008.  He was basically very "green broke."  Kaily was Johnny's fifth owner!  Kaily, a junior rider, and her trainer are training Johnny for both show and field hunters, endurance, and western trail (for her mother).   Kaily and Johnny fox hunt regularly in southern California.  In July 2009, Kaily and Johnny participated in their first show, and a very large one, at the LA Equestrian Center. Johnny was the only mustang in the English classes.  They brought home two blue ribbons and five other ribbons in equitation and jumping classes.  We are glad to know that Johnny finally has a forever home and that he can showcase to others how nice the wild ones can be in the show ring.  Keep up the great work, Kaily! 
Mike adopted Ruby when she was a yearling.  In the time that Mike has owned her, she has been camping, pulled logs, showed at various shows in several disciplines, participated in clinics, carried Mike on numerous trails, including the Fearful Crossing reenactment ride across a waterless patch of Nevada desert, been a BLM ambassador on many occasions, and basically been an all-around horse for Mike.  They definitely enjoy trying new things and searching for new trails to ride. 
Wendee adopted Yogi from the corrals.  They now compete in dressage in USDF sanctioned shows in the Mustang breed category.  Keep up the good work showcasing the wild ones! 
Cherilynn purchased Sally, a 2005 Twin Peaks mare, in 2011.  She now rides her English and western, in gymkhana, on the trails in Connetquot State Park where she is lucky enough to keep Sally!  Cherilynn and Sally live near Central Islip, NY.  Here we see Cherilynn and Sally participating in a Breast Cancer Charity Trail Ride in 2013.  

The Twin Peaks HMA is very popular with adopters.  These horses are known to have excellent temperaments and generally have some size to them.*  Many of the horses exceed 15 hh.  People say they see a thoroughbred influence on these animals.  In addition to the bays, blacks, sorrels, and chestnuts found in most herds, many of the horses gathered in 2010 were appaloosas.  Twin Peaks burros tend to be stouter burros than their hot desert counterparts.  The Twin Peak burro herds tend to have more brown animals than gray, or other burro colors.

If you would like to have your animal showcased on our pages, please send a photo and your story to adumas@blm.gov.  Please include your name, your animal's name, HMA, year adopted, age, and what you do with him/her.

 

 

 

*As with any of the HMAs, these characterizations are general and no guarantee of how your adopted animal will behave.  Each animal is a unique individual with his/her own personality.