Special Status Plants


Special Status Plants are those plants found on public lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management whose survival is of concern due to:

1) their limited distribution,
2) low number of individuals and/or populations, and
3) potential threats to habitat. 

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) uses the term "Special Status Plants" to include:

1) Federal Endangered, Threatened, and Proposed plants. 
2) BLM Sensitive plants. Sensitive plants are those species that are not Federally listed as Endangered or Threatened or Proposed for Federal listing, but which are designated by the BLM State Director for special management consideration.  By national policy, Federal Candidate species are automatically treated as Sensitive.  The California State Director has also conferred sensitive status on California State Endangered, Threatened, and Rare species, on species with a California Rare Plant Rank of 1B (plants rare, threatened, and endangered in California and elsewhere) on the Special Vascular Plants, Bryophytes, and Lichens List maintained by the California Department of Fish and Game (http://www.dfg.ca.gov/biogeodata/cnddb/pdfs/SPPlants.pdf) that are on BLM lands or affected by BLM actions and that are not already special status plants by virtue of being Federally listed or proposed (unless specifically excluded by the State Director on a case-by-case basis), and on certain other plants the State Director believes meet the definition of Sensitive.

BLM Policy on Special Status Plants. It is BLM policy to manage for the conservation of Special Status Plants and their associated habitats and to ensure that actions authorized, funded, or carried out do not contribute to the need to list any Sensitive species as Threatened or Endangered.  For additional information on BLM policy and procedures regarding the management of Special Status Plants under the jurisdiction of the California State Office, please refer to BLM-California Manual Supplement 6840.06 and BLM-California Manual Handbook H-6840-1, both of which are available from the links below.  The Manual Supplement describes BLM policy in California.  The Handbook establishes the procedures to be used in complying with BLM policy. 

Survey Protocols for Special Status Plants.  BLM-California has developed protocols for the survey (inventory) of special status plants that must be followed in order to comply with BLM policy, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), and the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  These protocols are found in BLM Manual Handbook H-6840-1, Special Status Plant Management, a link to which is provided immediately above, and are supplemented by the following documents:

 
Official Special Status Plant List.  The California State Office maintains a current list of all special status plants known or suspected to occur on BLM lands. This list (current as of September-October 2013) is available for all of the BLM lands managed by the California State Office and for the BLM lands managed by each of the 15 BLM-California Field Offices:

Concise List of Special Status Plants.   The following provides the complete list of special status plants, showing scientific name, common name, type of plant, family, status (whether Federally listed or BLM sensitive), and whether the species is known or suspected on BLM lands:

1. All special status plants under the jurisdiction of the California State Office (PDF file, 356 kilobytes).
2. Special status plants under the jurisdiction of individual California-BLM Field Offices (PDF files, ranging in size from 189 kilobytes to 241 kilobytes):

Alturas ArcataBakersfield
Barstow Bishop Eagle Lake
El Centro Hollister Mother Lode  
Needles Palm Springs Redding
Ridgecrest Surprise Ukiah

 

 

 

 

 

Detailed List of Special Status Plants.   The following provides the complete list of special status plants with more information than the above list, including: scientific name, common name, type of plant, Federal status, State of California status, BLM status, California Rare Plant Rank, Nevada Native Plant Society status, State of Nevada status, NatureServe global and state ranks, recovery plan status, date the record was last updated, comments, and occurrence information by field office:    

1. All special status plants under the jurisdiction of the California State Office (PDF file, 1615 kilobytes).
2. Special status plants under the jurisdiction of individual California-BLM Field Offices (PDF files, ranging in size from 548 kilobytes to 1856 kilobytes):

Alturas Arcata Bakersfield
Barstow Bishop Eagle Lake
El Centro Hollister Mother Lode
Needles Palm Springs Redding
Ridgecrest Surprise Ukiah

 

 

 

 

 

Additional Information on Some Special Status Plants (older list).  Additional information on some of the special status plants managed by California-BLM and its 15 Field Offices, including photographs for many of the species, can be found in the following links.  Be advised, however, that because the lists for the plants included in the links below are older than the more current list of official special status plants provided above, the list below may not include all currently designated special status plants, and status information may be different from that given in the list above.  We are in the process of updating the following list to correspond to the more current information.  Until this process is complete, however, the list above should be considered the official BLM special status plant list.

Older List of All California-BLM Special Status Plants with Links to Additional Information  

Older List of BLM Special Status Plants by Field Office:

Alturas Arcata Bakersfield
Barstow Bishop Eagle Lake
El Centro Hollister Mother Lode  
Needles Palm Springs Redding
Ridgecrest Surprise Ukiah

 
 

 

 

 
 

Reports.  A link to reports prepared for special status plants.


Mojave Monkeyflower
Mojave Monkeyflower
Prostrate Buckwheat
Prostrate Buckwheat
Slender Stemmed Monkeyflower
Slender Stemmed Monkeyflower