California Coastal National Monument

California Coastal National Monument logo

CALIFORNIA COASTAL NATIONAL MONUMENT

UPDATE

August 19, 2011
 


Seabird Protection Network Point Sur - Point Mugu Completes Year 1.
  
The first year of the five-year start-up effort of the Seabird Protection Network Point Sur to Point Mugu Chapter (previously referred to as the “South Central Coast Seabird Project” or the “Seabird Protection Network South Central California Coast Chapter”) has been completed. This CCNM project is a $1.2 million, five-year seabird enhancement initiative that was designed to implement the Seabird Colony Enhancement Program as outlined in the Torch/Platform Irene Restoration Plan and further refined by the Torch/Platform Irene Trustee Council. This project has provided the opportunity to demonstrate how the CCNM can use its partnerships and management connections to coordinate and collaborate on a large effort and create additional stewardship opportunities for local communities and organizations.

The project consists of three components--(1) Seabird and Human Disturbances Monitoring (monitoring); (2) Information and Outreach (education/outreach); and (3) Coordinated Enforcement and Management (enforcement). The project is managed by the BLM Hollister Field Office with Eric Morgan, Fort Ord Public Lands project manager, serving as the project manager. The monitoring component is coordinated by CCNM Collaborative Partner PRBO Conservation Science (a CCNM Collaborative Partner and a non-profit bird research organization) with Dan Robinette, PRBO Conservation Science’s senior seabird biologist in their Vandenberg [Air Force Base] Office serving as the project’s monitoring coordinator. The education/outreach component is coordinated by California State Parks (a CCNM Core-Managing Partner) with Cara O’Brien, an interpretative specialist in the San Luis Obispo Coast District Office, serving as the project’s outreach coordinator. The enforcement component is coordinated by the BLM with the Bakersfield Field Office chief law enforcement ranger Kelly Cole and Hollister Field Office chief law enforcement ranger Brian Martin serving as the project’s co-coordinators for the enforcement component.

The first year of the project was designed as the organizing year with the focus on assessing the project area’s seabird information and getting the initial monitoring started. PRBO Conservation Science prepared a “Seabird and Human Disturbance Monitoring Plan” for the project area, while the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (another CCNM Collaborative Partner) prepared a draft report titled “Aerial Photographic Surveys of Surface-Nesting Seabirds in South Central California in June 2010” to help guide the development of the monitoring plan. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service also began the preparation of two additional reports, one to analyze the project area’s 1996-2009 aerial photographic surveys of Brandt’s and Double-Crested Cormorant colonies and the other to analyze the June 2011 aerial photographic surveys of surface-nesting seabirds in the project area.

BLM and PRBO Conservation Science have been working together on an assessment of the existing literature related to the project area’s seabird monitoring and research in order to help guide the season 2-5 monitoring strategy. PRBO Conservation Science will include the completed literature search concurrently with the report of the seabird/human disturbance monitoring results for the 2011 season, which will be available sometime this fall. PRBO Conservation Science has completed the first year of field work under the monitoring plan. Based on this monitoring, there has been some investigation by BLM law enforcement rangers and California Department of Fish and Game (the other CCNM Core-Managing Partner) wardens. Furthermore, transect studies conducted by monitoring crews are helping to delineate sections of coastline that are sensitive to human disturbance or are currently being disturbed.

On the outreach side, a new website for the Seabird Protection Network (SPN) Point Sur to Point Mugu Chapter was launched at www.blm.gov/ca/ccnm/spn. A SPN Point Sur to Point Mugu brochure was prepared, an interpretive panel was developed for installation at the William Randolph Hearst Memorial State Beach, and a display poster was prepared for installation in partner agencies’ display kiosks throughout the project area. A “Seabird Olympics” outreach activity with a SPN “Identification Guide” was developed and tested with 200 Girl Scouts from age 5 to 18 during a San Luis Obispo County event and also with dozens of kids at the annual Coastal Discovery Fair at San Simeon, California. In addition, an E-Newsletter, entitled “From Point to Point - An Update of the Seabird Protection Network for Point Sur to Point Mugu” was implemented that gives updates on the SPN’s progress.

An initial working group meeting of the SPN Point Sur to Point Mugu law enforcement group was held on March 29, 2011, in San Luis Obispo with agency enforcement officials and representatives. Among other items, they discussed linking with the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary’s (MBNMS)(a CCNM Collaborative Partner) Law Enforcement Technical Advisory Committee and held their follow-up meeting with the MBNMS Law Enforcement TAC on May 12, 2011, in San Simeon, California. At this meeting, it was agreed that the MBNMS Law Enforcement TAC will serve, in part, as the SPN Point Sur to Pont Mugu Chapter working group. In addition, the BLM and San Luis Obispo County Sheriff and the Santa Barbara County Sheriff approved respective MOUs that will provide, among other things, additional opportunities for BLM law enforcement rangers to support state and local protection efforts along the coast of San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties. 

Coast-Wide Black Oystercatcher Survey Field Work Completed.  The field work for the first California coast-wide American Black Oystercatcher survey in more than 20 years was completed in June 2011. More than 100 observers participated in this survey, including some CCNM-related personnel and a wide range of CCNM partners. Hosted by Audubon California, in collaboration with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (a CCNM Collaborative Partner), the 2011 Black Oystercatcher survey was designed as a first step to answer some fundamental questions about the species and its distribution in California. This first step was primarily focused on getting a handle on the number of Black Oystercatchers and the number of nests. Although the key findings will not be out until the end of this month, preliminary counts indicate that there are approximately 1,200 individual American Black Oystercatchers and about 160 nests along the 1,100 miles of the California coast. This is a good sign since it is 200 to 300 more birds than previously assumed.

The CCNM helped Audubon California fill in some of the gaps by coordinating with BLM staff, the Seabird Protection Network, and a number of CCNM partners to carry-out the brief survey in select portions of the coast. This includes CCNM Stewards--The Sea Ranch Association CCNM Stewardship Task Force (They identified a dozen nests longer their 10-miles of coast) and the U.S. Navy; as well as CCNM Collaborative Partners--Redwood Region Audubon Society, Mendocino Coast Audubon Society, PRBO Conservation Science, and Laguna Ocean Foundation.

[For additional information re: the American Black Oystercatcher see “CCNM Assisting Audubon California with Coast-Wide Black Oystercatcher Survey,” CCNM Updates 04/18/11, pp.1 & 2.]

Sea Ranch Association Task Force Completes Gualala Point Island 2011 Monitoring & Analysis of 2010 Data.  Between June 25 and July 15, 2011, The Sea Ranch Association (TSRA) CCNM Stewardship Task Force conducted the fifth and final year of the intensive daily seabird monitoring effort of Gualala Point Island. Gualala Point Island is located off the northern portion of TSRA properties along the north coast of Sonoma County. Situated within the northern part of TSRA’s CCNM Stewardship Area, Gualala Point Island provides the habitat for five species of nesting seabirds and a haul out area for harbor seals. The island was the site of a 2006 nesting seabird disturbance as the result of the first year of an Independence Day fireworks display that was launched from the Mendocino County community of Gualala, located about 1.2 miles to the north of the island. As a result of the reported disturbance, the BLM and TSRA Task Force initiated a five-year intensive monitoring program that involved developing and implementing a 20-day period, 10-days on either side of fireworks display period in June and July. 

After the first year of monitoring, the California Coastal Commission and the California courts put a halt to the fireworks display, but the five-year monitoring study continued. The study examined colony attendance patterns and relative breeding parameters for seabirds and marine mammals at Gualala Point Island. The 2011 monitoring completed the five-year intensive monitoring phase of the monitoring program. A final report for both the analysis of 2011 monitoring data and the analysis of the five years of intensive monitoring will be completed sometime in 2012. In addition to the five-year monitoring study, the monitoring program now includes (1) a quarterly Coastal Island Survey along the ten miles of The Sea Ranch coastline, (2) a monthly non-breeding season survey at three islands, and (3) a weekly breeding season survey at the same three islands.

TSRA Task Force also completed the analysis and report of the 2010 data, the fourth year of the intensive monitoring. As in the previous three years, data were collected on all species observed; However, efforts focused on the colony of Brandt’s Cormorants because of their known sensitivity to human disturbance and the relatively large sample size that could be monitored. For this species, colony monitoring combined land-based nest monitoring and bird count data from a series of aerial photographs. The aerial photography established “snapshots” in time and provided coverage of the entire cormorant colony. Land-based nest monitoring was constrained because only about 11% of the colony was visible from the two mainland monitoring point. Still, land-based nest monitoring provided relatively detailed information on individual visible nests and helped interpret aerial photographic results.

The aerial photographs showed 71 pairs of Brandt’s Cormorants nesting on Gualala Point Island in 2010. The number of nests decreased dramatically compared to 152 in 2009. Overall, 75% of nests hatched eggs compared to 67% in 2009. This decrease in nest numbers was likely correlated with ocean conditions rather than a local event. Western Gulls nested in relatively larger numbers than in 2008-09, with 58 nests monitored in 2010 compared to 41 in 2009. Apparent nesting success with an estimated hatching rate of 2.5 chicks per nest was higher than in 2009, but still lower than in 2007-2008. TSRA Task Force also monitored four other nesting or roosting seabird species (i.e., Pelagic Cormorants, Pigeon Guillemots, Black Oystercatchers, and Brown Pelicans) and one marine mammal species (i.e., Harbor Seals).

The final report of the 2010 monitoring effort (i.e., R. LeValley and A. Musgrove, 2011, “Seabird and Marine Mammal Monitoring at Gualala Point Island, California, Sonoma County, May to August 2010,” The Sea Ranch CCNM Stewardship Task Force and BLM, 55 pp.) will be available on the CCNM website at www.blm.gov/ca/ccnm under “Papers & Reports of Interest.”

Orange County Rocks Bill H.R. 944 Reported to the Full House by Unanimous Consent.  On July 20, 2011, congressional bill H.R. 944, which dealing with removing the current withdrawals of the federal rocks and small islands off the coastline of Orange County, was passed out of the Committee on Natural Resources and on to the whole House of Representative for their consideration. H.R. 944 was introduced on March 8, 2011, by Congressman John Campbell (R-CA). The bill was referred to the Committee on Natural Resources, and within the Committee to the Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands. On May 4, 2011, the Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands held a hearing on the bill. On June 15, 2011, the Full Resources Committee met to consider the bill. The Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands was discharged by unanimous consent. No amendments were offered and the bill was ordered favorably reported to the House of Representatives by unanimous consent. As stated in the Committee of Natural Resources’ report, “The purpose of H.R. 944 is to eliminate an unused lighthouse reservation, provide management consistency by incorporating the rocks and small islands along the coast of Orange County, California, into the California Coastal National Monument managed by the Bureau of Land Management and meet the original Congressional intent of preserving Orange County's rocks and small islands.” If and when the bill is passed out of the full House, it then goes to the Senate for consideration, including Senate committee review as well. The previous attempt, H.R. 86, an identical bill to H.R. 944, stalled in the Senate at the end of the last Congress in 2010.

[For additional information re: H.R. 944, see “Bill Introduced in Congress Again to Add Orange County Rocks to CCNM,” CCNM Update 04/18/11, p.7.]

“Look Who’s Rockin!” Display Panel Added to CCNM Exhibit at Point Vicente Interpretive Center on Palos Verdes Peninsula.  While the Coachella Valley hosted 50,000 heavy metal rockers for a seven hour long music festival on Earth Day weekend, a BLM interpretive work crew promoted another type of “rocker,” those who live and feed on the offshore rocks and small islands off the California coast. Tracy Albrecht, interpretive specialist for the BLM’s Palm Springs/South Coast Field Office, "drummed up" an exhibit to showcase the California Coastal National Monument. BLM volunteers Cliff Johnson, Brian Edwards, and Ozzie Edwards "jammed" with their power tools as they installed the display. The site is the Point Vicente Interpretive Center, managed by the City of Rancho Palos Verdes (a CCNM Collaborative Partner). Located on a pronounced western point of the Palos Verdes Peninsula, the Point Vicente Interpretive Center is in an ideal setting for viewing marine wildlife. The Point Vicente Visitor Center also serves as the CCNM visitor contact station for the CCNM Palos Verdes Peninsula Gateway effort, covering the southern California section of the CCNM. The Interpretive Center now has two interpretive panels for visitors to learn about the CCNM’s natural, geological and visual resources.

[See photos of the event in BLM California News.bytes at www.blm.gov/ca/news/newsbytes, Issue 478, 4/29/11, within “Look Who’s Rockin!” article.]

CCNM & Seabird Protection Network at 6th Annual Coastal Discovery Fair.  For the sixth year in a row, BLM’s California Coastal National Monument (CCNM) hosted an outdoor booth at the Coastal Discovery Fair, held on Saturday, July 16, 2011, at the Randolph Hearst Memorial State Beach in San Simeon located along San Luis Obispo County’s north coast. More than a dozen agencies and organizations participated in this day-long event and each had activities for kids. Adjoining the CCNM’s booth was the Seabird Protection Network Point Sur to Point Mugu Chapter’s booth. This chapter of the Seabird Protection Network (SPN) is lead by the BLM with California State Parks, one of the CCNM’s Core-Managing Partners, coordinating the outreach portion. The SPN Point Sur to Point Mugu Chapter has been initiated by funding from an offshore oil spill restoration settlement and is being managed by the BLM's Hollister Field Office as part of its role related to the CCNM.

At the BLM booth, CCNM manager Rick Hanks and his wife Julie helped more than a hundred kids, young and old, color, cut, and assemble pelican headbands and/or make CCNM booklets adorned with rubber stamp images of rocks and islands related animal and plant life. They also handed out CCNM brochures and other CCNM items while discussing the CCNM and the BLM with dozens and dozens of event visitors. At the Seabird Protection Network booth, Cara O’Brien, the project’s outreach coordinator and an interpretive specialist for the California State Parks’ San Luis Obispo Coast District, and Robin Chase, a State Parks interpretive aid, conducted a “Seabird Olympics” that involved a number of fun activities, including the Brown Pelican scoop, the Pelagic Cormorant dive, and the Black Oystercatcher stab and hammer. In addition, they gave out seabird field guides that included tips for safely viewing seabirds and provide the opportunity for youngsters to earn junior ranger badges if they swore to help protect seabirds.

The fair is the annual celebration for the Coastal Discovery Center that is managed by the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (a CCNM Collaborative Partner) in cooperation with California State Parks.  The Coastal Discovery Center serves as the CCNM’s visitor contact station for its Piedras Blancas-San Simeon Gateway initiative.

[See photos of the event in BLM California News.bytes at www.blm.gov/ca/news/newsbytes, Issue 490, 7/21/11, within “California Coastal National Monument & Seabird Protection Network activities at Coastal Discovery Fair” article.]

CCNM & California Desert District Booths a Big Hit at 3rd Annual San Diego Parks & Open Spaces Day.  Snakes, tortoises, and button-making attracted hundreds of visitors to the BLM booths at the 3rd Annual San Diego Parks and Open Spaces Day held at Cabrillo National Monument located on the tip of San Diego’s Point Loma. Sponsored by the National Park Service, the day-long event on Saturday, July 23, 2011, highlighted “parks, natural areas, open spaces and organizations that support the use of these spaces in the San Diego area.” This year, the BLM had two booths side-by-side - - one for the California Coastal National Monument and one for the California Desert District. The two booths had non-stop visitation by many of the more than 3,000 park visitors for the day. While dozens and dozens of kids made CCNM buttons and created CCNM booklets with rubber stamp images related to animals and plants found on and around the CCNM’s rocks and islets, the biggest attraction of the entire event were the reptiles at the California Desert District booth.

Barbara Croonquist, California Desert District public contact representative, was busy all day long as she provided the public with the opportunity to view and handle a king snake, gopher snakes, chuckwalla lizards, and young desert tortoises, while she discussed the BLM and the California Desert District. CCNM manager Rick Hanks spent the day discussing the California Coastal National Monument, the BLM, and career opportunities with a continuous flow of visitors, while he helped kids create their own rubber stamp-decorated CCNM booklets and hand-colored CCNM buttons. BLM volunteers Michael Croonquist and Ahmicqui Kennedy assisted with both the button making and the handling of the reptiles and kept Barbara and Rick from becoming swamped.

[See photos of the event in BLM California News.bytes at www.blm.gov/ca/news/newsbytes, Issue 491, 9/29/11, within “BLM coastal and desert booths a big hit at San Diego Parks and Open Spaces Day” article.]

BLM Helps Trinidad Celebrate Fish Festival.  More than 2,000 people turned out to celebrate the 54th annual Trinidad Fish Festival, despite wind, in the coastal community of Trinidad, California, on June 19, 2011. The Greater Trinidad Chamber of Commerce’s fish fry had people lining up along the town's main drag to be fed white fish and Coho Salmon. The Chamber fillet roughly 400 pounds of fish and prepared about 1,400 dinners. The BLM was there to help the community celebrate. At the BLM booth, children and adults enjoyed creating artistic fish prints by using real fish. Pacific Choice Seafood, a local company, donated fish for the art projects. While the children were busy with their art projects, BLM staff members visited with parents, informing them about the BLM, the CCNM, and the CCNM Trinidad Gateway. The staff gave out nearly 200 scenic posters featuring the Monument. More than 100 fish prints went home with families as well. BLM staff members, summer interns, and a high school student helped staff the BLM booth. 

[See photos of the event in BLM California News.bytes at www.blm.gov/ca/news/newsbytes, Issue 486, 6/23/11, within “BLM helps Trinidad celebrate Fish Festival”]

CCNM Part of Cabrillo College Watsonville Earth Day Celebration.  Cabrillo College completed its Earth Week celebration on Earth Day, Friday, April 22, 2011, at its Watsonville campus on the eastside of the plaza in downtown Watsonville, California, in spite of overcast skies, cold winds, and smoke from the Apple Growers Cold Storage warehouse fire. The California Coastal National Monument was one of a half dozen organizations invited to participate in the Earth Day event that was scheduled to link with the City of Watsonville’s weekly farmers’ market that takes place every Friday afternoon in front of the Cabrillo College Watsonville Campus. A Mexican folkloria dance group kicked off the final day of Cabrillo College's Earth Week celebration. CCNM manager Rick Hanks and his wife, an instructor at Cabrillo College and a BLM volunteer, staffed the Coastal Monument’s booth helping dozens of kids, young and old, make pelican headbands. Visitors to the booth were also treated to Coastal Monument brochures and pins and National Landscape Conservation System bandanas. As the event was ending, the CCNM booth was still busy with young ones pleased with the chance to make something of their own.

[See photos of the event in BLM California News.bytes at www.blm.gov/ca/news/newsbytes, Issue 478, 4/29/11, within “California Coastal National Monument part of Cabrillo College Watsonville Earth Day celebration” article.]

Stewards of the Coast & Redwoods Now CCNM Collaborative Partner.  On April 19, 2011, the Stewards of the Coast and Redwoods became the California Coastal National Monument’s 26th official Collaborative Partner. With the completion of the memorandum of understanding, the Stewards of the Coast and Redwoods agreed to cooperate with the BLM and its various CCNM partners on the protection, monitoring, and oversight needs for the CCNM along the Sonoma Coast, as well as help with the planning, development, and implementation of a future CCNM Gateway for the Sonoma Coast.

The Stewards of the Coast and Redwoods is a non-profit, environmental and interpretive organization that works in contractual partnership with California State Parks in the Russian River District, including Sonoma Coast State Park (from Bodega Bay to north of Jenner), to support volunteer, education, and stewardship programs. The Stewards of the Coast and Redwoods is comprised of an active 10-15 member Board of Directors, an Executive Director, Programs Manager, an administrative staff, and a membership of over 500 supporters. The Stewards of the Coast and Redwoods’ vision is to provide the public with opportunities for personal inspiration, satisfaction, and nurturing of spirit and intellect through environmental stewardship programs.

Laguna Ocean Foundation Newest CCNM Collaborative Partner.  After a number of years working with the BLM on a variety of resource data collection efforts, including shorebird and Black Oystercatcher surveys, the Laguna Ocean Foundation is now an official CCNM Collaborative Partner. The Laguna Ocean Foundation Board of Directors’ chairperson signed the CCNM partnership memorandum of understanding (MOU) in May of 2011, but the MOU did not get a BLM California directorate signature until July 18, 2011, making the Laguna Ocean Foundation the newest CCNM Collaborative Partner. As a partner, the Laguna Ocean Foundation is most interested in working with BLM in a mutually beneficial collaboration to act as stewards of the rocks and reefs off the Laguna Beach coast and the natural resources associated with them. In addition, the Foundation will coordinate and cooperate with the BLM and other CCNM partners in order to carry out educational and outreach initiatives associated with the CCNM and the development of a future CCNM Gateway for the Orange County coast. The Foundation has been the primary grassroots organization in support of legislation to provide management consistency by incorporating the rocks and small islands along the coast of Orange County, California, into the California Coastal National Monument.

[For current status of the legislation, see article above, page 4, re: “Orange County Rocks Bill H.R. 944 Reported to the Full House by Unanimous Consent”.]

The Laguna Ocean Foundation is an independent, private, non-profit organization dedicated to public service and educational pursuits. The Foundation was founded in 2003 by a small group of concerned Laguna Beach residents in response to the Vision Laguna 2030 report. Laguna Ocean Foundation’s mission is to preserve and protect the beaches, intertidal zone, watersheds, and ocean waters of Laguna Beach, and to educate the public about these resources. The Laguna Coast is a rocky coastline with highly diverse habitats that are rare in the South Coast Region. The coast is also within a highly urbanized region. The Foundation is, therefore, especially engaged in development of innovative management methods to address conservation of coastal resources in an urbanized setting. To support this goal, the Foundation pursues original research on the viability of coastal resources, the effects of human disturbances on intertidal and near shore ecosystems and the effectiveness of management methods. These challenges call for long-term collaboration with multiple stakeholders in the conservation of coastal and marine resources. 

CCNM Assists with Listening Session for National Ocean Council’s Strategic Action Plan.  One year after the creation of the first federal comprehensive policy for the U.S. oceans, coasts and the Great Lakes, the National Ocean Council held listening sessions in San Francisco, California, on June 30, 2011--the last day of National Ocean Month. This was one of 12 listening sessions that the National Ocean Council held around the country. Building from the Executive Order issued by President Obama last July that established the National Ocean Policy and charged the Council with implementing the policy, these public listening sessions mark the latest milestone in implementing an ocean policy that addresses the most critical issues facing our oceans and America’s coastal communities.

The listening sessions were to support public awareness of and offer a forum for public discussion and comment on the outlines for the nine strategic action plans that are being developed by the Council this summer. The focus of the nine plans are: (1) Ecosystem-Based Management; (2) Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning; (3) Inform Decisions and Improve Understanding; (4) Coordinate and Support; (5) Resiliency and Adaptation to Climate Change and Ocean Acidification; (6) Regional Ecosystem Protection and Restoration; (7) Water Quality and Sustainable Practices on Land; (8) Changing Conditions in the Arctic; and (9) Ocean, Coastal, and Great Lakes Observations, Mapping, and Infrastructure.

The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) hosted the San Francisco listening session and, through the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Enforcement and Regulation (formerly the Minerals Management Service), recruited various DOI bureau staffers to assist. Marcia deChadenedes and James Weigand represented BLM and the CCNM by serving as subject matter expert for the breakout groups. Marcia covered the “Inform Decisions and Improve Understanding” group, while Jim covered the “Water Quality and Sustainable Practices on Land” group. In this capacity, the task was to summarize for the public the design and objectives of the plan, support discussion if desired by participants, and clarify, as needed, any confusion regarding the process.

In addition, the National Ocean Council launched a month-long online public review period for strategic action plan outlines. These strategic actions plans will propose attainable goals and specific, measureable actions the federal government can implement to address key challenges facing our ocean, coasts, and Great Lakes These outlines and their corresponding action plans were drafted with input from a wide range of stakeholders. 

CCNM at California LCC’s New Office Opening.  On June 3, 2011, CCNM assistant manager Marcia deChadenèdes attended the open house for the California Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) for their new office on the campus of the California State University Sacramento in Sacramento, California. At this opening the California LCC shared presentations and exhibits of their 2010 and 2011 projects. As one of twenty-one LCCs established through a Department of the Interior executive order in February 2010, the California LCC’s charter defines their purpose as “a management-science partnership created to inform and promote integrated science, natural resource management and conservation to address impacts of climate change and other stressors within and across ecosystems.”

The BLM, unlike most of the other federal land management agencies, does not have a science and research arm. There is, therefore, much to gain through accomplishments of this regional resource. Through the California LCC, there are opportunities to partner with organizations managing existing and formative research efforts. In some cases they are directly applicable to CCNM or BLM needs, while in others, they can create a foundation from which further research can be tiered. For example, PRBO Conservation Science (a CCNM Collaborative Partner) presented two projects at the open house, both which were identified for a second year of funding. The first project is the development of an environmental change network to monitor ecological consequences in California and the second project is the development of a broad scale multi-species monitoring protocol in response to future land use and climate change. For further information, see the California LCC website at http://californialcc.org/index.html.

Monterey Bay Region a Pilot Project for America’s Great Outdoors’ Initiative.  The White House's America's Great Outdoors Initiative has identified the Monterey Bay region (San Mateo, Santa Cruz, Santa Clara, San Benito, Monterey, and San Luis Obispo Counties) as a pilot project area. This is one of a number of similar projects getting started across the county and Congressman Sam Farr has helped get the Monterey Bay region’s initiative moving. This effort, which commenced on June 17, 2011, at a meeting in Watsonville, California, is being led by U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). Management officials from the NRCS, the BLM Hollister Field Office (FO), NOAA’s Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (a CCNM Collaborative Partner), Pinnacles National Monument, Los Padres National Forest, and other federal agencies participated in a public focus session to identify collective resources, partnerships, and connections in the region and how they can be utilized to maximize the benefits to natural resources, working landscapes, and local communities. CCNM assistant manager Marcia deChadenèdes and Hollister FO manager Rick Cooper are on the interagency team working to compile and analyze notes from that day in order to generate a draft work plan for the region.

Monterey Bay Region Sustainable Tourism Group Changes Name to Monterey Bay National Heritage Area Alliance.  Because the variety of sustainable tourism projects on the horizon would be strengthened if they were to be accomplished under National Heritage Area status and the effort to establish a National Heritage Area for the Monterey Bay region is well underway, the Monterey Bay Region Sustainable Tourism Group has elected to change its name to the “Monterey Bay National Heritage Area Alliance.” According to Bill Kampe, Pacific Grove Mayor pro tem and co-chair of the group, the name change helps to identify the group’s dominant focus. The group also decided that the effort is an “alliance” since it involves a large number of organizations from the three county (Monterey, Santa Cruz and San Benito) region, from convention, and visitor bureaus and museums to local historical societies. Lending support to the organizational effort along with the CCNM are California State Parks, the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, and the National Park Service.

[For additional information re: the Monterey Bay Region Sustainable Tourism Group, now the Monterey Bay National Heritage Area Alliance, see “Monterey Bay Region Sustainable Tourism Group Focusing on National Heritage Area Proposal,” CCNM Update, 4/18/11, pp. 5 & 6]  

BLM Helps North Coast Youth Get Outdoors.  The BLM's Arcata Field Office has been busy getting North Coast youth outdoors, where they could experience environments ranging from the coastal tidepools to ancient redwoods. In addition to providing educational opportunities, the outings have given young people a chance to improve their environment. On June 7, 2011, more than 900 students from 16 Eureka area elementary schools descended on the South Spit, Humboldt Bay earlier this month for the annual Ocean Day restoration and aerial art project. The BLM Arcata Field Office partnered with the California Coastal Conservancy and Friends of the Dunes for the project in which students pick up trash and pull invasive beach grass before forming an aerial art image with a conservation message. Ocean Day event takes place at the Mike Thompson Wildlife Area, South Spit Cooperative Management Area overseen by the BLM, Humboldt County, and the California Department of Fish and Game.

Another opportunity to learn about the ocean environment and the California Coastal National Monument was the focus of a Youth to Youth project involving students from Trinidad and Fortuna, California. In the project, four Trinidad sixth-grade students guided the fourth and fifth grade Fortuna students through tidepools in the Trinidad area on July 7, 2011. The older students helped explain the unique creatures that can survive an environment that changes with the daily tides. For many of the Fortuna students, it was their first time experiencing a tidepool.

[See photos of the event in BLM California News.bytes at www.blm.gov/ca/news/newsbytes, Issue 488, 7/7/11, within “BLM helps North Coast youth get outdoors” article.]

CCNM Related Meetings, Conference Calls & Events.  During the time period covered by this CCNM Update (i.e., April 19 through August 19, 2011), the CCNM Manager, other CCNM staff, and the managers and staff of the BLM California State Office and coastal field offices (FO) also participated in a variety of meetings, conference calls, events, and activities, including the following: 

  • CCNM booth at Cabrillo College-Watsonville Campus Earth Day celebration (Rick Hanks), Watsonville, CA, April 22, 2011
  • Installed “Look Who’s Rockin!” display panel at Point Vicente Interpretive Center (Tracy Albrecht), Rancho Palos Verdes, CA, Aprill 22, 2011 
  • CCNM booth at City of Los Angeles’ Cabrillo Marine Aquarium Earth Day celebration (Barbara Croonquist), San Pedro, CA, April 23, 2011
  • Meeting of Monterey Bay Region Sustainable Tourism Group re: Monterey Bay National Heritage Area (Hanks & Marcia deChadenèdes), Moss Landing, CA, April 27, 2011
  • Conference call of Seabird Protection Network Point Sur to Point Mugu Chapter outreach team with NOAA Gulf of the Farallones (Hanks, deChadenèdes & Cara O’Brien), April 28, 2011
  • Attended NOAA-Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary’s MERITO Partnership Appreciation Day (Hanks), Elkhorn Slough, CA, April 30, 2011
  • Attended National Association for Interpretation’s Climate Change Workshop (deChadenedes) Monterey, CA, April 30-May 1, 2011 
  • Monthly conference call with BLM National Landscape Conservation System (NLCS) Washington (D.C.) Office re: BLM California & BLM Nevada NLCS activities (Hanks), May 2, 2011 
  • Conference call with BLM Ukiah Field Office re: coastal program options with BLM volunteer Cindy Oster (Hanks, deChadenèdes & Rich Burns), May 2. 2011 
  • Conference call with Audubon California re: American Black Oystercatcher Survey planning (Hanks, deChadenèdes & Jesse Irwin), May 3, 2011 
  • Conference call with Steve McCabe, Research Coordinator, The Arboretum at University of California, Santa Cruz, re: potential terrestrial plant research on CCNM (Hanks & deChadenèdes), May 3, 2011 
  • Meeting with CCNM Trinidad Gateway subcommittee on cultural language re: CCNM kiosk at Trinidad Museum (Dave Johnson & Leisyka Parrott), Trinidad, CA, May 3, 2011 
  • Meeting with Trinidad Museum Society President Patricia Fleshner re: CCNM kiosk at Trinidad Museum, (Parrott), Trinidad, CA, May 5, 2011 
  • Presentation of pre-CCNM field trip slideshow to 180 students at Trinidad Elementary School (Parrott), Trinidad, CA, May 5, 2011 
  • Conducted CCNM tidepool field trip for 180 Trinidad Elementary School students at Patrick's Point State Park (Parrott), Trinidad, CA, May 9, 2011 
  • Conference call lead by California State Parks re: World Fair Silicon Valley 2020 related to federal & state public lands supplement for proposal (Hanks), May 11, 2011 
  • Conference call with National Geotourism Stewardship Council (Hanks), May 12, 2011 
  • Meeting of NOAA Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Law Enforcement Technical Advisory Committee with Seabird Protection Network Point Sur to Point Mugu Chapter Law Enforcement working group (Eric Morgan & Brian Martin), San Simeon, CA, May 12, 2011 
  • Meeting of CCNM Trinidad Gateway Committee (Johnson, Lynda Roush & Mike Sintetos), Trinidad, CA, May 13, 2011 
  • Conference call with BLM Hollister Field Office re: protection of Point Piños rocks & islets (Hanks, Rick Cooper & Erik Zaborsky), May 18, 2011 
  • Exhibit booth (with CCNM & NLCS bookmarks, bandanas, posters & brochures) at Environmental Expo High School student fair (Albrecht with Youth Initiative Incentive Team), Palm Springs, CA, May 20, 2011 
  • Conference call with Hollister Field Office re: protection of Point Piños rocks & islets (Hanks, Cooper & Zaborsky), May 23, 2011 
  • Meeting of Monterey Bay Region Sustainable Tourism Group re: Monterey Bay National Heritage Area (Hanks & deChadenèdes), Moss Landing, CA, May 23, 2011
  • Conference call of Seabird Protection Network Point Sur to Point Mugu Project Coordinators (Morgan, Hanks, deChadenèdes, Martin & Zaborsky), May 25, 2011 
  • Presentation of pre-CCNM field trip slideshow for 64 4th & 5th grade students at South Fortuna Elementary School (Parrott), Fortuna, CA, May 26, 2011 
  • BLM California NLCS conference call (Hanks & deChadenèdes), June 1, 2011 
  • Meeting with CCNM Trinidad Gateway subcommittee on cultural language re: CCNM kiosk at Trinidad Museum (Roush, Johnson & Parrott), Arcata, CA, June 3, 2011 
  • Attended California Landscape Conservation Cooperative Open House with 23 science project presentations, several by CCNM collaborative partner PRBO Conservation Science (deChadenèdes), Sacramento, CA, June 3, 2011 
  • Monthly conference call with BLM National Landscape Conservation System (NLCS) Washington (D.C.) Office re: BLM California & BLM Nevada NLCS activities (Hanks), June 6, 2011 
  • Conference call of Monterey Bay Region Sustainable Tourism Group re: Monterey Bay National Heritage Area proposal (Hanks & deChadenèdes), June 6, 2011 
  • Meeting with Trinidad Elementary School 6th grade tidepool mentors re: prepare for upcoming field trip (Parrott) Trinidad, CA, June 6, 2011 
  • Conducted CCNM tidepool field trip for 64 South Fortuna Elementary School 4th & 5th grade students at Patrick's Point State Park (Parrott), Trinidad, CA, June 7, 2011
  • CCNM Managers-Coordinators conference call (Hanks, Cooper, Roush, deChadenèdes, John Skibinski, Jeff Fontana & David Christy), June 7, 2011 
  • Attended America’s Great Outdoors Monterey Bay Focus Session (deChadenèdes) Watsonville, CA, June 18, 2011 
  • Event booth at Trinidad Fish Festival, (Parrott, Casey Hague, Brendan Leigh, Emily Afriat-Hyman, Youth to Youth volunteer Abi Anderson), Trinidad, CA, June 19, 2011 
  • Meeting of Monterey Bay Region Sustainable Tourism Group re: Monterey Bay National Heritage Area proposal (Hanks & deChadenèdes), Moss Landing, CA, June 20, 2011 
  • Meeting & field visit with City of Fort Bragg Planner Marie Jones re: plans for city’s 430 acres of recently acquired coastal (ex-Georgia Pacific) property & CCNM sign options (Hanks & deChadenèdes), Fort Bragg, CA, June 23, 2011 
  • Meeting of CCNM Point Arena Gateway Committee (Hanks, Burns, deChadenedes, Weigand & Fontana), Point Arena, CA, June 23, 2011
  • Meeting with CCNM Trinidad Gateway subcommittee on cultural language re: CCNM kiosk at Trinidad Museum (Roush, Parrott & Dave Fuller), Arcata, CA, July 28, 2011 
  • CCNM Southern California conference call to track status on priority projects (Hanks, deChadenedes, Albrecht, Croonquist, Greg Thomsen & Steve Razo), June 29, 2011 
  • National Ocean Council Strategic Action Plan Listening Session (deChadenèdes & Weigand serving as subject matter experts), June 30, 2011 
  • Monthly conference call with BLM National Landscape Conservation System (NLCS) Washington (D.C.) Office re: BLM California & BLM Nevada NLCS activities (Hanks,& deChadenèdes), July 11, 2011
  • Meeting with City of Pacific Grove Mayor pro-tem Bill Kampe re: shifting role of BLM in proposed Monterey Bay National Heritage Area effort (Hanks, deChadenèdes) July 11. 2011
  • CCNM booth at Coastal Discovery Fair (Hanks & O’Brien), San Simeon, CA, July 16, 2011 
  • Meeting & field tour with Seabird Protection Network - Point Sur to Point Mugu Monitoring Coordinator Dan Robinette of PRBO Conservation Science to review status of monitoring program & visit Shell Beach & Avila Beach area monitoring sites (Morgan), Pismo Beach, CA, July 19, 2011 
  • CCNM booth at San Diego Parks & Open Space Day at Cabrillo National Monument (Hanks & Croonquist), San Diego, CA, July 23, 2011 
  • America’s Great Outdoors Monterey action report team meeting (deChadenèdes), Salinas, CA, July 25, 2011 
  • Conference call with California Department of Transportation District 5’s Corby Kilmer re: Transportation Enhancement Funds Grant for signing of vista points & possible CCNM link (Hanks & deChadenèdes), July 27, 2011
  • Conference call with Torch Trustee Council re: update status of Seabird Protection Network - Point Sur to Point Mugu Project (Morgan), July 28, 2011 
  • Meeting with CCNM Trinidad Gateway subcommittee on cultural language re: CCNM kiosk at Trinidad Museum (Roush, Parrott & Dave Fuller), Arcata, CA, July 28, 2011 
  • Reprinted 5,000 CCNM Palos Verdes Peninsula brochures (Albrecht), July 28, 2011 
  • Monthly conference call with BLM National Landscape Conservation System (NLCS) Washington (D.C.) Office re: BLM California & BLM Nevada NLCS activities (Hanks), August 1, 2011 
  • Conference call of Monterey Bay Region Sustainable Tourism Group re: Monterey Bay National Heritage Area proposal & changing the name of the group to Monterey Bay National Heritage Area Alliance (Hanks & deChadenèdes), August 1, 2011 
  • Conference call with Stewards of the Coast & Redwoods Executive Director Michelle Luna re: possible Seabird Protection Network chapter for Sonoma County coast & grant opportunities (Hanks & deChadenedes), August 2, 2011 
  • Meeting of America’s Great Outdoors Monterey Bay Region action report subgroup (deChadenèdes), Monterey, CA, August 4, 2011 
  • Meeting of America’s Great Outdoors Monterey Bay Region action report subgroup (deChadenèdes), Monterey, CA, August 9, 2011 
  • Poster display highlighting CCNM at Humboldt County Fair, Ferndale, CA, August 11-21, 2011 
  • Meeting of Monterey Bay National Heritage Area Alliance (formerly Monterey Bay Region Sustainable Tourism Group) re: National Heritage Area proposal (Hanks), Watsonville, CA, August 15, 2011 
  • Meeting of Seabird Protection Network Technical Advisory Committee (deChadenèdes & Morgan), San Francisco, CA, August 18, 2011


 Contact Information.  

Any questions, comments, or requests for additional information? Contact Rick Hanks, CCNM Manager, at:


Bureau of Land Management
California Coastal National Monument
20 Hamilton Court
Hollister, CA 95023-2535
Phone: (831) 630-5006
fax: (831) 630-5055
Contact us by e-mail


Previous Updates:   Click here for archive of CCNM Updates


 California Coastal  National  Monument:

A unique partnership in protecting California's coastal resources
Comments to Webmaster