California Coastal National Monument

California Coastal National Monument logo

CALIFORNIA COASTAL NATIONAL MONUMENT

UPDATE

May 22, 2013 


CCNM Office in Santa Cruz to Close. 

With the retirement of California Coastal National Monument (CCNM) Manager Rick Hanks at the end of May 2013, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is temporarily shifting the operations of the CCNM from Santa Cruz to Sacramento. The office, located in Santa Cruz within the U.S. Geological Survey’s Pacific Coast and Marine Science Center, will close effective May 31, 2013. With the Santa Cruz office closing, the CCNM Santa Cruz mailing address will be discontinued and the telephone numbers will be disconnected. In the interim, until a new CCNM manager is named and a new office location is established, Ruben Leal, Associate District Manager for the BLM Central California District, will handle the CCNM management coordination. Leal will be assisted by Sara Kaner, a graduate student intern working with BLM California State Office’s National Landscape Conservation System coordinator. Kaner will handle some of the day-to-day tasks of the CCNM. 

The contact information for Leal and Kaner are as follows:

Ruben Leal
Associate District Manager
Central California District
USDI Bureau of Land Management
2800 Cottage Way, W-1623 
Sacramento, CA 95825
Phone: (916) 978-4305
Sara Kaner
National Landscape Conservation System Intern
Division of Natural Resources
California State Office
USDI Bureau of Land Management
2800 Cottage Way, W-1623 
Sacramento, CA 95825
Phone: (916) 978-4636
The on-site, day-to-day responsibility for the CCNM is with the individual BLM field office that administers their portion of the CCNM. The general contact information and the portion of the CCNM for which the specific BLM field office is responsible are identified below: 

Arcata Field Office (Oregon border to Pudding Creek on north side of Fort Bragg)
USDI Bureau of Land Management
1695 Heindon Road
Arcata, CA 95521-4573
Phone: (707) 825-2300
Field Manager: Lynda Roush
lroush@blm.gov

 

Hollister Field Office  (Golden Gate Bridge to San Luis Obispo County line)
USDI Bureau of Land Management
20 Hamilton Court
Hollister, CA 95023
Phone: (831) 630-5000
Field Manager: Rick Cooper
ricooper@blm.gov
Ukiah Field Office (Pudding Creek on north 
side of Fort Bragg to the Golden Gate Bridge
)
USDI Bureau of Land Management
2550 North State Street
Ukiah, CA 95482
Phone: (707) 468-4000
Field Manager: Rich Burns
rburns@blm.gov

 

Bakersfield Field Office  (San Luis Obispo County line to Los Angeles County line)
USDI Bureau of Land Management
3801 Pegasus Drive
Bakersfield, CA 93308
Phone: (661) 391-6000
Acting Field Manager: Gabe Garcia
grgarcia@blm.gov
 

Palm Springs - South Coast Field Office (Los Angeles County line to Mexico border)
USDI Bureau of Land Management
1201 Bird Center Drive
Palm Springs, CA 92262
Phone: (760) 833-7100
Field Manager: John Kalish
jkalish@blm.gov

 


If you need to get in touch with Rick Hanks after he retires, he can be contacted via e-mail at:  rickhanksccnm@yahoo.com.


CCNM Manager Recognizes 18 New CCNM “Rock Stars.”  

Before leaving his role as the CCNM Manager and retiring from the BLM, Rick Hanks recognized 18 new CCNM Rock Star Award recipients who have each played an important role in helping with the success of the California Coastal National Monument. The recipients received their awards at various times throughout late winter and early spring of 2013. The new CCNM Rock Stars, in order of receipt, are as follows:           

  • Tracy Albrecht (BLM Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument Interpretive Specialist) - for exemplary outreach support for California Coastal National Monument while serving as “BLM’s Southern California National Monuments Interpretive Specialist”; Presented by CCNM Manager Rick Hanks at the BLM Palm Springs/South Coast Field Office all-employees meeting in Palm Springs, CA, March 4, 2013 
  • Barbara Croonquist (BLM California Desert District Public Contact Representative) - for exemplary outreach support for the Southern California portion of the California Coastal National Monument; Presented by BLM California Desert Deputy District Manager for Outreach Steve Razo at the BLM California Desert District meeting in Moreno Valley, CA, March 4, 2013 
  • Greg Thomsen (BLM California Desert District Project Manager) - for exemplary role as the California Coastal National Monument’s Southern California Coordinator; Presented by California Desert District Manager Teri Rami at the BLM California Desert District meeting in Moreno Valley, CA, March 7, 2013 
  • Eric Morgan (BLM Fort Ord National Monument Manager) - for his California Coastal National Monument role as the Project Manager of the Seabird Protection Network Point Sur to Point Mugu Chapter; Presented by CCNM Manager Rick Hanks at the BLM Hollister Field Office all-employees meeting in Hollister, CA, March 12, 2013 
  • Erik Zaborsky (BLM Hollister Field Office Archaeologist) - for more than a decade of support and coordination of the BLM Hollister Field Office portion of the California Coast National Monument; Presented by CCNM Manager Rick Hanks at the BLM Hollister Field Office all-employees meeting, Hollister, CA, March 12, 2013
  • Cara O’Brien (California State Parks San Luis Obispo Coast District State Park Interpreter II) - for her exemplary role as the Information and Outreach Component Leader for the Seabird Protection Network Point Sur to Point Mugu Chapter; Presented by California State Parks San Luis Obispo Coast District Superintendent Nick Franco at the State Parks’ district management meeting in San Simeon, CA, March 27, 2013 
  • Jim Weigand (BLM California State Office Ecologist) - for excellence in coordinating and implementing the California Coastal National Monument’s research and science efforts; Presented by BLM California State Deputy Director for Natural Resources Tom Pogacnik at the BLM California State Office in Sacramento, CA, April 5, 2013 
  • Leisyka Parrott (BLM Arcata Field Office Interpretive Specialist) - for developing innovative ways to implement the outreach goals of the California Coastal National Monument Trinidad Gateway; Presented by CCNM Manager Rick Hanks at the CCNM Trinidad Gateway meeting in Trinidad, CA, April 12, 2013 
  • Lynda Roush (BLM Arcata Field Office manager) - for exemplary management support and coordination of the North Coast portion of the California Coast National Monument; Presented by CCNM Manager Rick Hanks at the CCNM Trinidad Gateway meeting in Trinidad, CA, April 12, 2013 
  • Jeff Fontana (BLM Northern California District Public Affairs Officer) - for more than a decade of exemplary public affairs support for the California Coastal National Monument; Presented by CCNM Manager Rick Hanks (via phone), Susanville, CA, April 18, 2013 
  • Kim Mincer (BLM Alaska State Office Visual Information Specialist) - for exemplary graphic support related to the design and development of the California Coastal National Monument Gateway indoor kiosks, posters, and photo exhibit; Presented by BLM Alaska State Director Bud Cribley at the BLM Alaska employees association event in Anchorage, Alaska, April 25, 2013 
  • Paul Roush (BLM California State Office Wildlife Biologist-Retired) - special thanks for his part in the Gualala Point Island-Sea Ranch Monitoring Project and early support of the California Coast National Monument; Presented by BLM Arcata Field Office Manager Lynda Roush in McKinleyville, CA, April 26, 2013 
  • Rachel Sowards-Thompson (BLM King Range National Conservation Area Interpretive Specialist) - for development of the Lost Coast Gateway and integrating the management of the California Coastal National Monument in with the King Range National Conservation Area; Presented by BLM King Range National Conservation Area (KRNCA) Manager Gary Pritchard-Peterson at the KRNCA staff meeting in Whitethorn, CA, May 6, 2013 
  • Larry Ames (BLM Ukiah Field Office Park Ranger-Interpreter) - for serving as the California Coastal National Monument Webmaster; Presented by CCNM Manager Rick Hanks at the BLM Ukiah Field Office all-employees meeting in Ukiah, CA, May 15, 2013 
  • Rich Burns (BLM Ukiah Field Office Manager) – for support and development of the California Coast National Monument and the Gateways Program along the Ukiah Field Office portion of the California Coast; Presented by CCNM Manager Rick Hanks at the BLM Ukiah Field Office all-employees meeting in Ukiah, CA, May 15, 2013 
  • Ron LeValley (Mad River Biologists Senior Biologist & Owner) - for more than a decade of exceptional support, commitment and dedication to the promotion of and scientific contribution to the California Coastal National Monument and seabird protection and conservation; Presented by CCNM Manager Rick Hanks at the CCNM Fort Bragg-Mendocino Gateway meeting in Fort Bragg, CA, May 15, 2013 
  • Jim Boucher (BLM Piedras Blancas Outstanding Natural Area) - for outreach support for the California Coastal National Monument at Piedras Blancas Light Station Outstanding Natural Area; Presented by BLM Bakersfield Field Office Associate Manager at the Piedras Blancas Light Station Association meeting in Cambria, CA, May 22, 2013 
  • Carole Adams (BLM Piedras Blancas Outstanding Natural Area Lead Volunteer) - for more than a decade of support for the California Coastal National Monument at Piedras Blancas Light Station Outstanding Natural Area; Presented by BLM Bakersfield Field Office Associate Manager at the Piedras Blancas Light Station Association meeting in Cambria, CA, May 22, 2013

[See photos of some of the recipients in News.bytes at www.blm.gov/ca/news/newsbytes, Issue 581, 05/23/2013]


Congressman Huffman Holds Announcement Ceremony Regarding Legislation to include Point Arena-Stornetta Public Lands in CCNM. 

The fog retreated and the sun covered the Point Arena-Stornetta Public Lands as more than 100 people gathered on a point above Arena Cove on April 29, 2013, for an announcement ceremony held by U.S. Congressman Jared Huffman (D-San Rafael), California’s 2nd District. The Congressman informed the gathering that he was introducing into the U.S. House of Representatives the “California Coastal National Monument Expansion Act of 2013.” This is a companion bill to a similar bill, S. 61, introduced last January by California’s two U.S. Senators, Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer. Both bills would add the more than 1,300 acres of the federally-owned Point Arena-Stornetta Public Lands to the CCNM as the first onshore portion of the CCNM.

Before the outdoor ceremony, the attendees gathered inside the Point Arena City Hall for snacks and to view an exhibit of artwork of Point Arena-Stornetta Public Lands by students from Point Arena’s Pacific Community Charter School. The fifth, sixth, and seventh graders’ water colors on display included depictions of the CCNM rocks and islets. Pacific Community Charter School students also prepared and presented Congressman Huffman with a book of their photographs and artwork of Point Arena-Stornetta Public Lands and included letters to President Obama and the First Lady asking for their help with the CCNM extension designation.

On the point above Arena Cove, City of Point Arena (a CCNM Collaborative Partner) Mayor Doug Burkey welcomed the gathering and introduced Congressman Jared Huffman. In his comments, Huffman said that he would introduce the bill when he returns Washington the following week.

Speaking at the gathering, BLM California state director Jim Kenna talked about the importance of public lands to the local community and Leslie Dahlhoff, Moat Creek Management Agency (a CCNM Collaborative Partner) board member and past mayor of Point Arena, read a letter of support from U.S. Senator Barbara Boxer. The gathering also heard support comments from Mendocino County Supervisor Dan Hamburg and Trust for Public Land Project Manager Markley Bavinger, as well as a letter of support from U.S. Senator Dianne Feinstein read by Jessica Hartzell, a Field Representative from Senator Feinstein’s San Francisco Bay area office. Visit Mendocino County Inc. (a CCNM Collaborative Partner) Executive Director Scott Schneider explained the economic advantage of tourism to the region. In addition, three Pacific Community Charter School students read a script supporting the addition of the Point Arena-Stornetta Public Lands to the California Coastal National Monument.

At the end of the ceremony, Congressman Huffman presented a certificate of special Congressional recognition for service to the community to CCNM Manager Rick Hanks who will be retiring at end of May after 40 years with the BLM.

[See photos of the event in News.bytes at www.blm.gov/ca/news/newsbytes, Issue 576, 03/18/2013]


Bill for First CCNM Land-Based Addition is Huffman’s First Bill as U.S. Congressman. 

On April 9, 2013, Congressman Jared Huffman (D-San Rafael) introduced his first bill as a United States Congressman, the California Coastal National Monument Expansion Act of 2013 (H.R. 1411). The bill would add the 1,255-acre Point Arena-Stornetta Public Lands on the Mendocino coast to the California Coastal National Monument.

In his news release, Congressman Huffman said, “I am proud that the first bill I introduce as a United States Congressman is one that would permanently protect over 1,200 acres of pristine California coastline.” He added that, “The Point Arena-Stornetta Public Lands are a national treasure and we must do everything we can to preserve the beauty of the North Coast for our children and grandchildren.”

The bill would add 10 miles to the California Coastal Trail and includes other natural jewels such as the Garcia Estuary and two miles of the Garcia River, a critical habitat for salmon and steelhead. The land includes habitat for endangered species, including the Point Arena Mountain Beaver and the Behren’s Silverspot Butterfly. The bill keeps the current recreational, ranching, and research uses and would boost the regional economy with an increase in tourism, the area’s largest employer.

Huffman was joined by original co-sponsor Congressman Mike Thompson, who previously represented the North Coast. Senators Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer have introduced companion legislation in the Senate.

“The Point Arena-Stornetta Public Lands are a national treasure,” said Thompson. “I am proud to join Jared in co-authoring this important legislation. We need to make sure this wonderful stretch of coastline is preserved for the protection of wildlife and the enjoyment of our children and grandchildren.”

Congressman Huffman’s news release also stated that the Congressman, joined by Congressman Thompson and Senators Feinstein and Boxer, sent a letter to President Obama on February 26, 2013, urging him to use his executive authority under the Antiquities Act of 1906 to include the Point Arena-Stornetta Public Lands in the California Coastal National Monument.


Greater Trinidad Chamber of Commerce Joins CCNM Trinidad Gateway as New CCNM Collaborative Partner. 

Affective April 2, 2013, the Greater Trinidad Chamber of Commerce became the latest member of the CCNM Trinidad Gateway committee. Although the Chamber has been participating in recent CCNM Trinidad Gateway committee meetings, with the signing of a memorandum of understanding with the BLM, the Greater Trinidad Chamber of Commerce became an official CCNM Collaborative Partner. “It's clear to me that the Chamber needs to be involved with the [CCNM Trinidad Gateway] partnership since one of our main efforts is to bring visitors to the area and these efforts need to dovetail with the activities of the Gateway group and the individual partners,” said Dennis Koutouzos, President of the Greater Trinidad Chamber of Commerce.

The purpose of the Greater Trinidad Chamber of Commerce is to promote the economic, civic, and social welfare of the people of Greater Trinidad. The Greater Trinidad Chamber of Commerce serves the area between Clam Beach and Big Lagoon, covering and serving such communities as Trinidad, Westhaven, and the unincorporated areas surrounding them.


Sierra Club Now a CCNM Collaborative Partner. 

With the signing of a memorandum of understanding (MOU) by BLM California State Director Jim Kenna on April 30, 2013, the Sierra Club is now a CCNM Collaborative Partner. Amanda Wallner, the Sierra Club staff member who will serve as the Sierra Club’s contact representative for the CCNM, said that, “The Sierra Club is looking forward to collaborating with the BLM on the protection of the California coast.”

Through the MOU, the Sierra Club’s network of thousands of members and activists become part of the effort of the BLM and its various partners to protect, monitor, and provide oversight for the CCNM along the California coast consistent with the Sierra Club’s authorities and capabilities. The Sierra Club will work with the BLM towards sustaining or enhancing the geographical character of the CCNM Gateway areas along the California coast. With the MOU in place, representatives of the Sierra Club will be able to formally participate in the various CCNM Gateway initiatives if they choose to do so.

The Sierra Club will also look for ways to coordinate its outreach, volunteer, and docent activities and initiatives with CCNM outreach initiatives and programs. The Sierra Club’s coastal campaign and eight coastal chapters are committed to conserving and protecting California’s coastal ecosystems to ensure long-term species survival in the face of sea level rise and climate change. Through its extensive outings program, the Sierra Club will also encourage its member chapters and groups to get out and explore the CCNM.

The Sierra Club is the largest grassroots environmental organization in the United States, with 1.4 million members and supporters. Since 1892, the Sierra Club has been working to protect communities, wild places, and the planet itself. The Sierra Club's mission is to explore, enjoy, and protect the wild places of the earth; to practice and promote the responsible use of the earth's ecosystems and resources; to educate and enlist humanity to protect and restore the quality of the natural and human environment; and to use all lawful means to carry out these objectives.


Look Who's Rockin at Orange County Children’s Water Education Festival. 

What happens when you put thousands of children together and sprinkle them with a little bit of magic, a dose of Disney, and a lot of enthusiastic agencies and volunteers?  The Children’s Water Education Festival of course!

On a perfectly sunny day in a campus park with enormous trees, more than 7,000 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 6th graders converged at University of California Irvine for the 17th annual Orange County Children’s Water Education Festival. Recognized nationally as the largest event of its kind, the festival featured 65 learning stations with venues as varied as Disneyland, Eco- Magic Show, National Geographic, Jet Propulsion Lab, and BLM’s California Coastal National Monument. The festival presented a unique opportunity to educate students about local water issues and to help them understand how they can protect water supplies and their environment. Since its inception, more than 90,000 children from schools throughout Orange County have participated in the festival.

At each station, organizations engage the students through interactive presentations taught according to California State Science Standards. Consequently, educators have consistently given the festival high marks. Showcasing the California Coastal National Monument was an activity center to learn about the plants and animals that use the Monument as their habitat. Students and teachers alike voiced many positive comments about the fast paced fun and learning at BLM’s Look Who’ Rockin activity.

After a brief introduction to BLM and the California Coastal National Monument, students launched into a loud and interactive game of Let’s Get Rockin -- a game of bingo with a BLM twist. Students identified and learned about important organisms and objects associated with the national monument. The enthusiasm of presenters Tracy Albrecht of the BLM’s Palm Springs/South Coast Field Office and the teams of Disney volunteers was infectious. As Tracy summed it up, “Look Who’s Rockin rocked!”

[See photos of the event in News.bytes at www.blm.gov/ca/news/newsbytes, Issue 573, 04/04/2013]


CCNM at Cabrillo National Monument’s First Bird Festival. 

The California Coastal National Monument has the pleasure of participating in the Cabrillo National Monument’s very first “Cabrillo Bird Festival.” Along with a dozen other agencies and organizations, including the BLM California Desert District, the CCNM was there to help celebrate International Migratory Bird Day. The festival was sponsored by the National Park Service (NPS) at Cabrillo National Monument -- located on the tip of San Diego’s Point Loma. More than 2,000 of the park’s visitors participated in the day-long event.

The CCNM, the other national monument associated with Point Loma, had a booth located in the center of the festival’s activities. While CCNM Manager Rick Hanks handed out brochures and spoke with park visitors about the CCNM, the BLM, and the National Landscape Conservation System, BLM’s Southern California National Monuments Interpretive Specialist Tracy Albrecht and BLM volunteers Lance Albrecht and Julie Hanks helped visitors, young and old, make pelican headbands and/or CCNM booklets. Using colored markers or canyons, the pelican headbands where first individually decorated and then cut-out with scissors and attached to a poster broad headband in a color of choice. Kids were seen throughout the day wearing their pelican headbands and enjoying observing their shadow pelican silhouettes. The CCNM booklet were also an individualized product with the youngster coloring in the CCNM logo with marking pens and decorating the “booklet” with a wide variety of sea life rubber stamps, including flying pelicans and hatching chicks. A few older visitors enjoyed decorating CCNM postcards with the rubber stamps.

Next to the CCNM booth, the BLM’s California Desert District (CDD) had a booth with a spinning wheel related to California Desert migratory birds. Every visitor had the opportunity to win one of a variety of BLM California Desert Conservation Land posters. The CDD outreach team representatives included CDD’s Public Contact Representative Barbara Croonquist, San Diego Project Wildlife Biologist Joyce Schlachter, and volunteer Dee Dechert.

[See photos of the event in News.bytes at www.blm.gov/ca/news/newsbytes, Issue 580, 05/30/2013]


Seabird Protection Network Booth at Easter Eggstravaganza. 

The Seabird Protection Network (SPN) Point Sur to Point Mugu Chapter had a booth on the day before Easter at the Easter Eggstravaganza. Held at Dinosaur Caves Park located in the Shell Beach area within the City of Pismo Beach, the event was sponsored by the City’s Parks and Recreation Department. At the event, Cara O’Brien, the SPN Point Sur to Point Mugu Chapter’s outreach coordinator and an Interpretive Specialist II for California State Park (a CCNM Core-Managing Partner) and Robyn Chase, a California State Parks Interpretive Specialist I, had the venue to interpret seabird family life on the cliffs and the California Coastal National Monument offshore rocks along the shoreline of the local park and to discuss Seabird SAFE viewing to approximately 300 children and adults.


Motion Picture “Need for Speed” Filmed on Stornetta Public Lands.

BLM’s Point Arena-Stornetta Public Lands were recently used as a movie set for filming a major motion picture. The DreamWorks feature film “Need for Speed”, due out in 2014, is about a car race starting from New York City and ending along the California coast. Though only about 50 feet of actual public lands were involved, the whole BLM landscape, including the CCNM, is the major backdrop for the California portion of the movie. The BLM Ukiah Field Office worked very closely with the movie’s location managers and special effects staffs to make sure no natural or visual resources were impacted by the filming. Ron LeValley, senior biologist and owner of Mad River Biologists, developed mitigation measures for the filming activities, including helicopter filming a helicopter chasing the racing cars, and was on-site during the filming.

The local filming involved three locations. The first location was a stretch of Highway 1 between just north of the Navarro River to just south of the Point Arena lighthouse. This portion of Highway 1 was filmed from a low-flying helicopter as the cars raced along the highway. The Second location was a “wreck” staged just south of the Navarro Bluff Road. Most of the filming was from land, but the helicopter was also used to film portions of the “wreck.” The crash scene was at a wide dirt pull-out that was mostly hidden from the offshore rocks by a small hill. The third part was another “wreck” staged on part of the BLM Point Arena-Stornetta Public Lands just south of the Point Arena lighthouse. This also entailed filming from a helicopter and included shots of the lighthouse.

“The logistics involved with making the movie along the southern Mendocino Coast highlighted the great partnerships the BLM has built through the CCNM with the local communities, the State of California, NGO’s, and others involved in the process,” said BLM Ukiah Field Office Manager Rich Burns. “Now that the filming process is complete, everyone is excited to see what the final product will be when the movie is released next year.”


Obama Administration Releases Plan to Promote Ocean Economy and Resilience.

The Obama Administration, on April 16, 2013, released the final plan for the implementation of the National Ocean Policy. In a news release, the White House said that the plan translates “the National Ocean Policy into on-the-ground actions to benefit the American people.” With a large amount of public input from a wide spectrum of individuals and interests, according to the White House, “the final Implementation plan focuses on improving coordination to speed Federal permitting decisions; better manage the ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes resources that drive so much of our economy; develop and disseminate sound scientific information that local communities, industries, and decision-makers can use; and collaborate more effectively with State, Tribal, and local partners, marine industries, and other stakeholders.”  A key part of the new implementation strategy is that without creating any new regulations or authorities, the plan will help ensure that the many Federal agencies involved in ocean management will work together to reduce duplication and red tape and use taxpayer dollars more efficiently.

This plan embodies the type of efficient, collaborative government that taxpayers, communities, and businesses expect from their Federal Government,” said Nancy Sutley, Chair of the Council on Environmental Quality and Co-Chair of the National Ocean Council. “With increasing demands on our ocean, we must improve how we work together, share information, and plan smartly to grow our economy, keep our ocean healthy, and enjoy the highest benefits from our ocean resources, now and in the future.”

“Science is the foundation upon which sound management of ocean and coastal resources is based,” said John P. Holdren, Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and Co-Chair of the National Ocean Council. “The President’s National Ocean Policy and the new implementation plan will help advance relevant science and its application to decision-making to strengthen the economies of our coastal regions while increasing their resilience and sustaining their resources.”

Our oceans and coasts support tens of millions of jobs and contribute trillions of dollars a year to the national economy through tourism, development, commercial fishing, recreational fishing and boating, energy, shipping, and other activities. Competition for increasingly vulnerable ocean resources is growing, presenting challenges for Federal agencies that follow and enforce more than 100 ocean-related laws. The final Implementation plan describes specific actions Federal agencies will take to address key ocean challenges, give states and communities greater input in Federal decisions, streamline Federal operations, save taxpayer dollars, and promote economic growth, including:

  • Providing better forecasting of ocean conditions and events to protect beachgoers and consumers from threats to their health and safety;
  • Sharing more and better data about severe storms and sea level rise, which will help coastal communities prepare for threats;
  • Supporting voluntary regional marine planning based on regional and local priorities; 
  • Improving the Federal permitting process to save time and money for ocean-based industries and taxpayers, while protecting health, safety, and the environment; 
  • Restoring important habitats that protect communities and support healthy ocean resources; and 
  • Improving our capability to predict conditions and prevent negative impacts as activity in the Arctic increases. 

The plan specifies that regional stakeholders will determine the scope, scale, and content of collaborative marine planning, that participation is voluntary, and that regional planning bodies will be established only in regions that want them. The full implementation plan can be found on-line at: www.whitehouse.gov/oceans.

The National Ocean Policy, established by Executive Order on July 19, 2010, created a National Ocean Council consisting of 27 Federal agencies and departments, providing a venue for agencies to work together cooperatively, share information, and streamline decision-making. The Council developed the Implementation plan over the past two years with extensive input from national, regional, and local stakeholders (including the BLM) from all marine sectors; tribal, State, and local governments; the private sector, scientists, and the public.


California Creates a Globally Significant Network of Marine Protected Areas. 

California recently completed an historic overhaul of how it manages its coastal waters by revising and expanding its system of marine protected areas (MPAs). This system of MPAs is the largest scientifically based network in the U.S. and second largest in the world. How California accomplished this consequential achievement is the subject of a March special issue of the journal Ocean and Coastal Management released last month. Articles analyze the challenges, achievements and lessons learned in the public MPA planning processes.

Under a mandate from the state’s 1999 Marine Life Protection Act (MLPA), California’s network of MPAs designated by the California Fish and Game Commission have greatly increased the proportion of state waters protected. The resulting network designates approximately 9.4 percent of state waters as “no-take” MPAs, and about 16 percent of state waters are now under some form of protection, which is a dramatic increase in coverage. Informed by science and crafted with significant stakeholder involvement, California’s new network of 124 designated areas (including 119 MPAs and five recreational management areas, all managed within the network)  replaced 63 existing MPAs that were mostly small (covering just 2.7 percent of state waters, with less than ¼ percent in no-take MPAs) and considered ineffective. The area covered by the MPAs represents approximately 60 percent of all no-take MPAs within the waters of the 48 contiguous U.S. states. Planning for this network of MPAs has yielded important lessons for other planning efforts globally.

The special issue of Ocean and Coastal Management includes nine articles by key participants from the MLPA Initiative, an innovative public-private partnership between the California Natural Resources Agency, California Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Resources Legacy Fund Foundation. The Initiative was tasked with helping the state redesign its MPAs in conjunction with stakeholders, scientists, experts, resource managers, policy-makers and the public. The articles have now been made available for free download at the journal website at:
 
“This special issue provides an important record of the MLPA Initiative’s work and how California conducted public processes to design an improved system of MPAs and, therefore, provides important lessons that can inform other similar efforts,” said Mary Gleason, Senior Scientist at The Nature Conservancy.
 

“The network of MPAs was designed by stakeholders with guidance from scientists, managing agencies, experts, members of the public and policy-makers, to meet the six goals of the MLPA, while also allowing for human uses of marine resources – understandably a complicated task that involved tradeoffs and compromises but with the vision that the MPA network will provide long-term benefits to California and our marine environment,” said Ken Wiseman, Executive Director of the MLPA Initiative.

Informed by scientific guidance intended to increase benefits and ecological connections among individual MPAs, this improved network is also globally significant.

“Completing the nation’s first statewide open coast system of marine protected areas strengthens California’s ongoing commitment to conserve marine life for future generations,” said Charlton H. Bonham, Director of the Department of Fish and Wildlife. “This statewide system will also benefit fish and fishermen in California for generations to come. And, the science shows that by protecting sensitive ocean and coastal habitats, marine life flourishes and in turn, creates a healthier system overall.”

The California Fish and Game Commission, the decision-making authority under the MLPA, acted on the basis of recommendations delivered by the MLPA Initiative, which conducted four regional public planning processes between 2005 and 2011. California’s MLPA calls for redesigning the state’s existing MPAs to meet specific goals to increase coherence and effectiveness in protecting the state’s marine life, habitats, ecosystems and natural heritage as well as to improve recreational, educational and study opportunities provided by marine ecosystems subject to minimal human disturbance.

Critical to successfully completing the new MPA network planning processes were some distinctive elements that are highlighted in the special issue, including:

  • Certain enabling conditions were in place in California to support the public MPA network planning: a legislative act, political support, and sufficient funding to support a multi-year effort.
  • The MLPA Initiative was a public-private partnership structured through formal agreements and charged with working with stakeholders, scientists, experts, resource managers, policy-makers and the public to develop recommendations for an improved network of MPAs.
  • The MLPA Blue Ribbon Task Force (BRTF), composed of experienced policy makers, provided oversight to the process and forwarded final recommendations to the California Fish and Game Commission. The BRTF played a crucial role in managing complex and contentious issues, balancing tradeoffs and maintaining momentum toward completing the planning processes.
  • The MLPA Master Plan Science Advisory Team provided robust scientific guidance and assessment, including developing simple guidelines for MPA network design based on ecological principles intended to support achieving the six MLPA goals. Marine scientists from many institutions participated in the planning process, including researchers from the University of California campuses at Davis, Santa Barbara and Santa Cruz and Ecotrust who developed mathematical models to project the fisheries costs and benefits, in terms of both economics and conservation, of the proposed MPAs. Contract technical support provided additional science capacity and developed new interactive, spatially explicit decision support tools, including MarineMap.
  • The MLPA Initiative overcame some of the challenges of prior statewide planning efforts, unsuccessful in part due to the size and complexity of California’s coast, by sequencing the work of the MLPA Initiative into four coastal regions which allowed planning and stakeholder engagement at more appropriate scales.

The MLPA Initiative was controversial and confronted a variety of political and legal challenges. Some fishing interests strongly opposed the process and viewed MPAs, which in part limit fishing in specific areas, as unnecessary for fisheries already subject to other regulations. Other stakeholders judged the redesigned and adopted MPAs as insufficient to meet the ecosystem protection goals of the MLPA.

An important challenge to adaptively managing MPAs over the long-term will be to demonstrate success in meeting the goals of the MLPA, including rebuilding or sustaining marine life populations.

“Science dictated the establishment of these MPAs, and their success will be reflected in data acquired through cost-effective monitoring. We are confident that monitoring will show the same results as elsewhere in the oceans: MPAs work." said Mike Weber, Program Officer with the Resources Legacy Fund Foundation.

Design of the MPA network aimed to meet science and design feasibility guidelines to help achieve the identified goals; final decisions in each region necessarily reflected tradeoffs needed to garner public acceptance and support for implementing the MPAs. California is developing mechanisms for assessing the effectiveness of the MPA network in the coming years, including establishing the MPA Monitoring Enterprise and a process for periodic review and adaptive management of MPAs. The first periodic review will take place in 2013 for the central coast, affording the first opportunity to test the adaptive management aspect of the MLPA.

"This first-of-its-kind network of MPAs in the United States shows how citizens can work with their government to apply the best of science to create a lasting ocean legacy for future generations," observed Meg Caldwell, Executive Director of the Center for Ocean Solutions at Stanford University in California.


California Central Coast Lighthouse Conference Held at San Simeon.

On the weekend of April 27 and 28, 2013, representatives from six central California lighthouses gathered in San Simeon, California and at Piedras Blancas Light Station Outstanding Natural Area for the California Central Coast Lighthouse Conference. Hosted by the Piedras Blancas Light Station Association, the focus of the conference was on lighthouse restoration, care and maintenance, and fundraising. The conference included presentations on Pigeon Point, Point Piños, Point Sur, Piedras Blancas, and Point San Luis light stations. Joe Jakubic from the International Chimney Corporation presented information on lighthouse restoration and lenses. Mr. Jakubic was also the featured speaker at a public screening at the National Geographic Hearst Castle Theater of a movie on the moving Cape Hatteras Lighthouse. About 250 people attended the Hearst Theater event and all marveled at how a 200 foot tall lighthouse could be moved. All who attended enjoyed the opportunity to share information and walked away enriched by the experience and vowed to have another conference in a year or two.


CCNM Related Meetings, Conference Calls & Events.  

During the time period covered by this CCNM Update (i.e., March 16 through May 24, 2013), the CCNM Manager, other CCNM staff, and the managers and staff of the BLM California State Office and coastal field offices (FO) also participated in a variety of meetings, conference calls, events, and activities, including the following:

  • Conducted & participated in meeting of BLM Hollister Field Office contacts & orientation of Point Piños for two Environment for the Americas shorebird interns (Rick Hanks, Erik Zaborsky & Brady Owens), Pacific Grove, CA, March 19, 2013
  • Delivered Seabird Protection Network (SPN) kayak posters to Morro Bay Natural History Museum to display in a wildlife viewing exhibit & delivered SPN kayak stickers to kayak rentals at Kayak Shack at Morro Bay State Park marina & Subsea Tours in Morro Bay (Cara O’Brien, Calif. State Parks & SPN Pt. Sur-Pt. Mugu Chapter outreach coordinator), Morro Bay, CA, March 20, 2013
  • Delivered SPN kayak stickers to Extended Horizons (O’Brien), Morro Bay, CA, March 20, 2013 
  • Delivered SPN kayak stickers to  Avila Beach Paddlesports (O’Brien), Avila Beach, CA, March 21, 2013 
  • Delivered SPN kayak stickers to  Bay Cruise & Kayak Rentals (O’Brien), Morro Bay, CA, March 21, 2013 
  • Delivered SPN kayak stickers to Central Coast Kayaks at Shell Beach & Pismo Beach Kayak Shop (O’Brien), Pismo Beach, CA, March 21, 2013           
  • Delivered SPN materials to Port San Luis Harbor Department (O’Brien), Avila Beach, CA, March 21, 2013
  • Attended Trinidad Bay Watershed Council meeting to discuss CCNM art contest for 2013 (Leisyka Parrott), March 25, 2013 
  • Presented CCNM Rock Star Award to Seabird Protection Network Pt. Sur to Pt. Mugu Chapter outreach coordinator Cara O’Brien by California State Parks San Luis Obispo Coast District Superintendent Nick Franco at State Parks District Managers’ meeting, San Simeon, CA, March 27, 2013 
  • Conducted CNM learning station for 7,000 3rd-6th graders at Orange County Children’s Water Education Festival (Tracy Albrecht), Irvine, CA, March 27-28, 2013 
  • Delivered SPN kayak stickers to Sea for Yourself Kayak (O’Brien), San Simeon, CA, April 8, 2013 
  • Staffed SPN booth at Pismo Beach Parks & Recreation's Easter Eggstravaganza at Shell Beach’s Dinosaur Caves Park (O’Brien), Pismo Beach, CA, March 30, 2013 
  • Conducted CCNM orientation for BLM Central California Associate District Manager Ruben Leal & BLM California’s National Landscape Conservation System graduate student intern Sara Kaner (Hanks), Sacramento, CA, April 1-4, 2013           
  • Participated in meeting to discuss strategy for interim management of CCNM (Hanks, Este Stifel, Ruben Leal, Mark Conley & Sara Kaner), Sacramento, CA, April 2, 2013           
  • Met with Pacific Grove Museum of Natural History Community Outreach Program Manager Allison Watson to discuss upcoming outreach & education events (Zaborsky & Brady Owens), Pacific Grove, CA, April 3, 2013 
  • Met with Pacific Grove Museum of Natural History collections curator Paul Vandecarr re: archival research materials related to shipwrecks on rocks off the Monterey County coast (Zaborsky & Owens), Pacific Grove, CA, April 3, 2013 
  • Participated in Seabird Protection Network Chapters first Coordination Webinar (Hanks & O’Brien), April 4, 2013 
  • Presented CCNM Rock Star Award to BLM California State Office Ecologist Jim Weigand (Tom Pogacnik), Sacramento, CA, April 5, 2013 
  • Delivered SPN brochures, SPN Seabird Field Guides & kayak stickers to Coastal Discovery Center for upcoming debut of seabird exhibit (O’Brien), San Simeon, CA, April 5, 2013 
  • Conducted followed-up with Sea for Yourself Kayak rentals to see how kayak stickers worked (O’Brien), San Simeon, CA, April 5, 2013 
  • Delivered sampling of SPN outreach products to Jim Allen, California State Parks Marketing Director for the San Luis Obispo Coast District (O’Brien), San Simeon, CA, April 5, 2013
  • Delivered SPN stickers, brochures & boating poster to Port San Luis Harbor Department (O”Brien), Avila Beach, CA, April 5, 2013  
  • Participated in meeting of Monterey Bay National Heritage Area Alliance Steering Committee (Hanks), Moss Landing, CA, April 8, 2013 
  • Attended CCNM Trinidad Gateway committee meeting (Hanks, Parrott, Lynda Roush & Gina Jorgenson), Trinidad, CA, April 12, 2013 
  • Presented CCNM Rock Star Awards to BLM Arcata Field Office Manager Lynda Roush & interpretive specialist Leisyka Parrott at CCNM Gateway meeting (Hanks), Trinidad, CA, April 12, 2013           
  • Attended Ohlone-Costanoan-Esselen Nation Quarterly Tribal Meeting to discuss current physical state of natural & cultural resources at Point Piños (Zaborsky), Castroville, CA, April 14, 2013 
  • Conducted & participated in CCNM Managers’ Quarterly conference call (Hanks, Stifel, Roush, Conley, Leal, Kaner, Greg Thomsen, Rick Cooper, John Skibinski, Gabe Garcia, Gary Pritchard-Peterson, Jim Weigand & Justin Robbins), April 17, 2013 
  • Participated in National Landscape Conservation System California/Nevada/Eastern States/Northern Tier monthly conference call (Hanks), April 18, 2013 
  • Presented CCNM Rock Star Award to BLM Northern California Public Affairs Officer Jeff Fontana (Hanks via phone), Susanville, CA, April 18, 2013 
  • Conducted field trip around Trinidad Head to lead about CCNM & tour HSU Marine Laboratory for 44 1st graders from Jacoby Creek Elementary School (Parrott & Clara Sander), Trinidad, CA, April 19, 2013 
  • Presented CCNM Rock Star Award to BLM Alaska State Office Visual Information Specialist Kim Mincer by BLM Alaska State Director Bud Cribley, Anchorage, AK, April 25, 2013 
  • Presented CCNM Rock Star Award to former BLM California State Office Wildlife Biologist Paul Roush (Roush), Arcata, CA, April 26, 2013 
  • Participated in meeting with NOAA Gulf of the Farallones re: northern expansion of National Marine Sanctuaries (Hanks & Burns), San Francisco, CA, April 26, 2013 
  • Participated in meeting with Sonoma County Regional Parks Director Dr. Caryl Hart & Park Planning Manager Steve Ehret re: developing CCNM Collaborative Partnership MOU with BLM (Hanks, Burns & Jonna Hildenbrand), Santa Rosa, CA, April 26, 2013 
  • Presented CCNM Rock Star Award to BLM King Range National Conservation Area Interpretive Specialist Rachel Sowards-Thompson (Pritchard-Peterson), Whitethorn, CA, May 6, 2013 
  • Conducted water quality monitoring field trip to Mill Creek for 25 6th graders from Trinidad Union School (Parrott & Dave Fuller), Trinidad, CA, May 7, 2013 
  • Staffed CCNM booth at first Cabrillo National Monument Bird Festival (Hanks & Albrecht), San Diego, CA, May 11, 2013 
  • Selected winner of Trinidad Bay “Drains to Bay” Art Contest for Trinidad Union School (Parrott & Gina Jorgenson), Trinidad, CA, May 14, 2013 
  • Presented CCNM overview discussion at BLM Ukiah Field Office all-employees meeting & CCNM Rock Stars Award to BLM Ukiah Field Office Manager Rich Burns & CCNM webmaster Larry Ames (Hanks), Ukiah, CA, May 15, 2013 
  • Attended CCNM Fort Bragg-Mendocino Gateway committee meeting (Hanks, Burns & Este Stifel), Fort Bragg, CA, May 15, 2013 
  • Presented CCNM Rock Star Award to Mad River Biologist Senior Biologist & Owner Ron LeValley, Fort Bragg, CA, April 15, 2013           
  • Attended CCNM Point Arena Gateway committee meeting (Hanks, Burns & Stifel), Point Arena, CA, May 16, 2013 
  • Attend CCNM Point Arena celebration for retiring CCNM Manager Rick Hanks (Hanks, Burns, Stifel, Conley, Bob Wick, Bethney Lefebvre & Trent Milam), Point Arena, May 16, 2013 
  • Attended Trinidad Bay Watershed Council meeting (Parrott), Trinidad, CA, May 20, 2013
  • Presented CCNM Rock Stars Award to BLM Piedras Blancas Outstanding Natural Area Manager Jim Boucher & Piedras Blancas Outstanding Natural Area lead volunteer Carole Adams (Skibinski), San Cambria, CA, May 22, 2013

Bureau of Land Management
California Coastal National Monument
20 Hamilton Court
Hollister, CA 95023-2535
Phone: (831) 630-5006
fax: (831) 630-5055
Contact us by e-mail


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